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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

James H. Cox

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Lincoln

James H. Cox

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-7804
  • Office: CAL 218
  • Office Hours: MW 12:00 – 1:30 PM and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Biography

James Cox’s primary research interests are twentieth and twenty-first century Native American literature, especially novels; the twentieth and twenty-first century American novel; Native American literary theory; twentieth and twenty-first century ethnic American literatures, including Chicana/o literature and literature of immigration; and the history of Native Americans in American literature and popular culture. He has published articles on Sherman Alexie, Thomas King, Gertrude Bonnin (Zitkala-Sa), and Todd Downing and an article on Susana Rowson, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, and Lydia Maria Child.

His book Muting White Noise: Native American and European American Novel Traditions was published in 2006 by the University of Oklahoma Press. It was released in paperback in 2009. The Red Land to the South: American Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico was published in 2012 by the University of Minnesota Press.

He is the former co-editor of SAIL (Studies in American Indian Literatures), on the editorial board of MELUS, and the co-editor of the The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature.

Cox has given invited talks at the University of New Mexico's Indigenous Book Festival and at Denison University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Bucharest. He has won grants from the Sequoyah National Research Center and the Historical Society of New Mexico. He has also won four teaching awards, including both the President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award and The Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009.

He is a co-founder of the Native American and Indigenous Studies undergraduate certificate, Native American and Indigenous Studies graduate portfolio, and the Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) program. He currently serves as the Associate Director of NAIS.

E 376M • Immigration Literature

34930 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 302
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

E 376M  l  Literature of Immigration [1990 to the Present]-HONORS

Instructor:  Cox, J

Unique #:  34930

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Restrictions:  English Honors; Plan I Honors

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Cultural Diversity, Writing

Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will devote ourselves in this course to the study of late twentieth and early twenty-first century short fiction and novels about immigration, primarily but not exclusively to the United States, from a diverse range of home countries. We will think about these novels within the contexts of U.S. literary history; immigration debates in the U.S. in the 1990s and 2000s; 9/11; and the Clinton, Bush, and Obama presidencies, for example. Key questions will include how class, education, gender, race, and religion shape the experience of immigration as well as the form of immigration narratives.

Tentative Reading List: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah (2013, Knopf); Oscar Casares, Amigoland (2009, Little Brown); Junot Diaz, Drown (1996, Riverhead); Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex (2002, Picador); Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake (2003, Mariner); Joseph O’Neill, Netherland (2008, Vintage); Philip Roth, The Plot Against America (2005).

Requirements & Grading: Class participation, attendance, and presentation: 20%; Short essays (3-4 pages): 40%; Research paper (10-12 pages): 40%.

E 349S • Ernest Hemingway

35805 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 0.120
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J

Unique #:  35805

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: In this course we will devote ourselves to a study of Ernest Hemingway, the winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize for Literature. We will read short fiction, novels, and non-fiction from throughout his entire career, beginning with early works such as In Our Time and The Sun Also Rises and finishing with the posthumous A Moveable Feast. We will take formal, historical, and cultural approaches to all these works and discuss, for example, Hemingway the stylist; Hemingway as the voice of the Lost Generation; and Hemingway as an icon of American masculinity. We will also consider issues such as race, nationality, class, and religion that permeate his work.

Required Reading (Tentative): In Our Time (1925); The Sun Also Rises (1926); A Farewell to Arms (1929); Green Hills of Africa (1935); Across the River and Into the Trees (1950); The Old Man and the Sea (1952); A Moveable Feast (1964).

Requirements & Grading: Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way: 60% for three essays of three to four pages each; 20% for one substantial revision of one of the three to four page essays; and 20% for attendance, class participation, and one presentation of a daily reading assignment.

Attendance: Required. Excessive absences (more than 5) will adversely influence your final grade.

E 379R • Native American Literature

36220 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 2.128
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J

Unique #:  36220

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This class will focus on influential, award-winning, and often controversial Native American (American Indian) writers that are part of the first two generations of the post-1968 Native American Renaissance. The authors that we read will provide us with the critical framework for our discussions of form, identity, storytelling, tradition, community, citizenship, and the representation of Native Americans in popular culture.  One primary goal will be to foreground Native historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts and to attempt to understand the readings from within those contexts. An equally important goal of the course will be to strengthen your critical reading, writing, and research skills.

Tentative reading list: Alexie, Sherman (Spokane and Coeur d’Alene). The Toughest Indian in the World.

Erdrich, Louise (Turtle Mountain Ojibway). The Round House.

King, Thomas (Cherokee). The Truth About Stories.

Power, Susan (Standing Rock Dakota). The Grass Dancer.

Silko, Leslie Marmon (Laguna Pueblo). Ceremony.

Welch, James (Blackfeet / Gros Ventre). Winter in the Blood.

Selected poems and short stories by Alexie, King, Stephen Graham Jones, and others.

In-class handouts.

Requirements & Grading: 10% for annotated bibliography and other short writing assignments related to the research paper; 20% for attendance, participation, and oral presentation; 30% for two critical essays of 4-5 pages each; 40% for one research paper of ten pages.

E 349S • Ernest Hemingway

35830 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35830            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: In this course we will devote ourselves to a study of Ernest Hemingway, the winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize for Literature. We will read short fiction, novels, and non-fiction from throughout his entire career, beginning with early works such as In Our Time and The Sun Also Rises and finishing with the posthumous A Moveable Feast. We will take formal, historical, and cultural approaches to all these works and discuss, for example, Hemingway the stylist; Hemingway as the voice of the Lost Generation; and Hemingway as an icon of American masculinity. We will also consider issues such as race, nationality, class, and religion that permeate his work.

Required Reading (Tentative): In Our Time (1925); The Sun Also Rises (1926); A Farewell to Arms (1929); Green Hills of Africa (1935); Across the River and Into the Trees (1950); The Old Man and the Sea (1952); A Moveable Feast (1964).

Requirements & Grading: Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way: 60% for three essays of three to four pages each; 20% for one substantial revision of one of the three to four page essays; and 20% for attendance, class participation, and one presentation of a daily reading assignment.

Attendance: Required. Excessive absences (more than 5) will adversely influence your final grade.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34790-34835 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  34790-34835            Flags:  Cultural diversity

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature and Cultural Identity --

This course is a broad survey of American literature from its origins to the present. In order to explore the diversity of American experiences as represented in writing, we will read works by African American, Chicana/o (Mexican American), Chinese American, European (English, French, Spanish) American, and Native American authors. We will discuss many aspects (literary, cultural, historical, political) of each piece of writing on the syllabus, but one main interest will be in the way that these authors explore what being “American” means both to them and the community or communities that they represent. I will also provide some historical and cultural materials to help place the readings in context. In addition to familiarizing yourself with these important and compelling pieces of writing, a primary goal will be for you to practice becoming close, critical readers.

Texts:

Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar Nunez. Adventures in the Unknown Interior of America. 1542. [available on Blackboard; designated Bb on Daily Course Schedule; please print a copy]

Chopin, Kate. The Awakening. 1899.

Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave. 1845. [available on Blackboard; designated Bb on Daily Course Schedule; please print a copy]

Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises. 1926.

Course Packet [designated CP on the Daily Course Schedule] available at IT Copy, 512 W. MLK Blvd.

All poems are available on multiple websites.

Requirements & Grading: Four exams, with short answer and essay questions, which cover the four general periods that we will be studying.

E 395M • Contemp Native Amer Fict/Thry

35870 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 900am-1030am CLA 0.108
show description

Contemporary Native American Fiction and Theory

This course is a survey of contemporary Native American fiction within the context of current criticism and theory. We will have as our three main objectives: to become familiar with the history of the field of American Indian literary studies; to become familiar with the two influential modes of inquiry--tribal nation specificity and American Indian literary nationalism--at the forefront of current theory and practice; and to become familiar with some canonical and other less well-known Native American fiction writers. We will spend the first part of the semester reading recent overviews of the field before focusing on the critical and theoretical work of those scholars--Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, LeAnne Howe, Sean Teuton, Robert Warrior, Jace Weaver, Craig Womack--currently shaping the conversations in the field. The work of these scholars and others will inform our approach to the short stories and novels on the reading list. The politics of fiction in Indian Country will be of particular interest. What place does fiction have, if any, within contemporary American Indian struggles for self-determination?

E 349S • Ernest Hemingway

35470 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 103
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35470            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: In this course we will devote ourselves to a study of Ernest Hemingway, the winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize for Literature. We will read short fiction, novels, and non-fiction from throughout his entire career, beginning with early works such as In Our Time and The Sun Also Rises and finishing with the posthumous A Moveable Feast. We will take formal, historical, and cultural approaches to all these works and discuss, for example, Hemingway the stylist; Hemingway as the voice of the Lost Generation; and Hemingway as an icon of American masculinity. We will also consider issues such as race, nationality, class, and religion that permeate his work.

Required Reading (Tentative): In Our Time (1925); The Sun Also Rises (1926); A Farewell to Arms (1929); Green Hills of Africa (1935); Across the River and Into the Trees (1950); The Old Man and the Sea (1952); A Moveable Feast (1964).

Requirements & Grading: Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way: 60% for three essays of three to four pages each; 20% for one substantial revision of one of the three to four page essays; and 20% for attendance, class participation, and one presentation of a daily reading assignment.

Attendance: Required. Excessive absences (more than 5) will adversely influence your final grade.

E 377K • American Novel After 1920

35680 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 2.202
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35680            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The many enduring contacts and conflicts between diverse communities have always been of interest to American novelists. In this class, we will consider the contributions to this literary history made by authors who place these contacts and conflicts at the center of their work. In our consideration of the novels on the reading list, we will discuss issues such as representation and self-representation; familial, cultural, communal, regional, socio-economic, and national identities; and immigration, assimilation, and cultural authenticity. We will discuss the specific kinds of borders between people that these authors erase, negotiate, and, often, reconstruct in old and new ways and look at the specific kinds of contacts and conflicts between people and the various consequences of and resolutions to these conflicts that these authors depict. Primary goals of the course include closely examining the aforementioned key features of the twentieth- and early twenty-first century U.S. novel as well as strengthening your critical reading and writing skills.

Texts: F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925); Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises (1926); Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937); Jack Kerouac, On the Road (1957); Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian (1985); Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake (2003); Nina Maria Martinez, Caramba! (2004); Philip Roth, The Plot Against America (2005); Sherman Alexie, Flight (2007).

Requirements & Grading: Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way: 60% for three essays of three to four pages each; 20% for one substantial revision of one of the three to four page essays; and 20% for attendance, class participation, and one presentation of a daily reading assignment.

Attendance: Required. Excessive absences (more than 5) will adversely influence your final grade.

E S349S • Ernest Hemingway

83875 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  83875            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will devote ourselves to a study of Ernest Hemingway, the winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize for Literature. We will read short fiction, novels, and non-fiction from throughout his entire career, beginning with early works such as In Our Time and The Sun Also Rises and finishing with the posthumous A Moveable Feast. We will take formal, historical, and cultural approaches to all these works and discuss, for example, Hemingway the stylist; Hemingway as the voice of the Lost Generation; and Hemingway as an icon of American masculinity. We will also consider issues such as race, nationality, class, and religion that permeate his work.

Required Reading (Tentative): In Our Time (1925); The Sun Also Rises (1926); A Farewell to Arms (1929); Green Hills of Africa (1935); Across the River and Into the Trees (1950); The Old Man and the Sea (1952); A Moveable Feast (1964).

Requirements & Grading: Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way:  Two Exams – 40% each; Attendance, class participation (quality and quantity), in-class writing, including reading quizzes – 20% total.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34715-34750 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34715-34750            Flags:  cultural diversity

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test. 

Course Description: Literature and Cultural Identity --

The goal of this course is to study the "masterworks" of American literature, and we will, therefore, read masterworks by some combination of African American, Asian American, European American, Native American, and Latina/o authors. Though we will discuss many aspects (literary, cultural, historical, political) of each text on the syllabus, one main interest will be in the way that these authors explore what being "American" means both to them and the community or communities that they represent. I will also provide some historical and cultural materials to help place the readings in context.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter seventh edition, ed. Nina Baym

SAMPLE AUTHORS: Rudolfo Anaya, William Bradford, Sandra Cisneros, Charles Alexander Eastman, William Faulkner, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Langston Hughes, Gish Jen, Flannery O'Connor, Alice Walker.

Grading: Four exams, with short answer and essay questions, which cover the four general periods that we will be studying.

E 377K • American Novel After 1920

35495 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 2.128
show description

Instructor:  Cox, J            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35495            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The many enduring contacts and conflicts between diverse communities have always been of interest to American novelists. In this class, we will consider the contributions to this literary history made by authors who place these contacts and conflicts at the center of their work. In our consideration of the novels on the reading list, we will discuss issues such as representation and self-representation; familial, cultural, communal, regional, socio-economic, and national identities; and immigration, assimilation, and cultural authenticity. We will discuss the specific kinds of borders between people that these authors erase, negotiate, and, often, reconstruct in old and new ways and look at the specific kinds of contacts and conflicts between people and the various consequences of and resolutions to these conflicts that these authors depict. Primary goals of the course include closely examining the aforementioned key features of the twentieth- and early twenty-first century U.S. novel as well as strengthening your critical reading and writing skills.

Texts: F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925); Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises (1926); Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937); Jack Kerouac, On the Road (1957); Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian (1985); Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake (2003); Nina Maria Martinez, Caramba! (2004); Philip Roth, The Plot Against America (2005); Sherman Alexie, Flight (2007).

Requirements & Grading: Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way: 60% for three essays of three to four pages each; 20% for one substantial revision of one of the three to four page essays; and 20% for attendance, class participation, and one presentation of a daily reading assignment.

Attendance: Required. Excessive absences (more than 5) will adversely influence your final grade.

E F350R • Interwar Us Literature

83605 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am SZB 286
show description

E 350R (Topic: Interwar U.S. Literature) and 379R (Topic: Interwar U.S. Literature) may not both be counted.

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course takes as its purview novels published by US writers in the 1920s and 1930s. The interwar period includes major movements such as the Harlem Renaissance and Modernism, and it was also the golden age of detective fiction.  The required readings offer a geographically diverse range of works: Hemingway's France and Spain; Larsen’s Chicago, New York, and Denmark; Faulkner's Mississippi; Hammett’s and McNickle's Montana; Hurston's Florida; and Chandler's Los Angeles. We will place these works in their regional, national, and historical contexts, consider their stylistic innovations, and attend particularly to questions of class and ethnicity. 

 

Texts: Hemingway, Ernest, The Sun Also Rises (1926); Nella Larsen, Quicksand (1928); Dashiell Hammett, Red Harvest (1929); Faulkner, William, As I Lay Dying (1930); McNickle, D'Arcy, The Surrounded (1936); Hurston, Zora Neale, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937); Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep (1939).

 

Requirements & Grading: Class participation and in-class writing: 25%; Three exams: 25% each.

E 395M • Contemp Native Amer Fict/Thry

36025 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.104
show description

Contemporary Native American Fiction/Theory

Course Description: This course is a survey of contemporary Native American fiction within the context of current criticism and theory. We will have as our three main objectives: to become familiar with the history of the field of American Indian literary studies; to become familiar with the two influential modes of inquiry--tribal nation specificity and American Indian literary nationalism--at the forefront of current theory and practice; and to become familiar with some canonical and other less well-known Native American fiction writers. We will spend the first part of the semester reading recent overviews of the field before focusing on the critical and theoretical work of those scholars--Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, LeAnne Howe, Sean Teuton, Robert Warrior, Jace Weaver, Craig Womack--currently shaping the conversations in the field. The work of these scholars and others will inform our approach to the short stories and novels on the reading list. The politics of fiction in Indian Country will be of particular interest. What place does fiction have, if any, within contemporary American Indian struggles for self-determination? What role can it play, if any, in a tribal nation's enduring economic or health crises? What does it mean for our work with American Indian fiction that many tribal nation scholars ask these questions?

*Required Readings Come Primarily from the American Indian Literature Field Exam List*

Possible Primary Texts:

Alexie, Sherman. The Toughest Indian in the World. 2000.

Erdrich, Louise. Tracks. 1988. ---. Four Souls. 2004.

Howe, LeAnne. The Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story. 2007.

King, Thomas. Green Grass, Running Water. 1993.

LaDuke, Winona. Last Standing Woman. 1999.

Silko, Leslie Marmon. Ceremony. 1977.

Welch, James. Winter in the Blood. 1974.

Possible Secondary Texts:

Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth. Why I Can't Read Wallace Stegner: A Tribal Voice. Selections. 1996.

Howe, LeAnne. "The Story of America: A Tribalography." 2002.

Justice, Daniel Heath. Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History. Selections. 2006.

Teuton, Sean. Red Land, Red Power: Grounding Knowledge in the American Indian Novel. 2008.

Warrior, Robert. The People and the Word: Reading Native Non-fiction. Selections. 2005.

Weaver, Jace, Craig Womack, and Robert Warrior. American Indian Literary Nationalism. Selections. 2006.

Weaver, Jace. That the People Might Live: Native American Literatures and Native American Community.Selections. 1997.

Womack, Craig, Daniel Justice, and Christopher Teuton, eds. Reasoning Together: The Native Critics Collective. Selections. 2008.

Womack, Craig. Red on Red: Native American Literary Separatism. Selections. 1999.

Requirements and Grades: Reading Responses 25%; Oral Presentation 15%; Seminar Paper 50%; Conference Proposal 10%

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

33960-34005 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am BUR 106
show description

Course Description: Literature and Cultural Identity -- The goal of this course is to study the "masterworks" of American literature, and we will, therefore, read masterworks by some combination of African American, Asian American, European American, Native American, and Latina/o authors. Though we will discuss many aspects (literary, cultural, historical, political) of each text on the syllabus, one main interest will be in the way that these authors explore what being "American" means both to them and the community or communities that they represent. I will also provide some historical and cultural materials to help place the readings in context. 

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter seventh edition, ed. Nina Baym

SAMPLE AUTHORS: Rudolfo Anaya; William Bradford; Sandra Cisneros; Charles Alexander Eastman; William Faulkner; Nathaniel Hawthorne; Langston Hughes; Gish Jen; Flannery O'Connor; Alice Walker.

Grading: Four exams, with short answer and essay questions, which cover the four general periods that we will be studying.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test. 

E 377K • American Novel After 1920

34910 • Fall 2010
Meets T 500pm-800pm PAR 103
show description

Course Description: The many enduring contacts and conflicts between culturally and ethnically diverse communities have always been of interest to American novelists. In this class, we will consider the contributions to this literary history made by authors who place these contacts and conflicts at the center of their work. In our consideration of the novels on the reading list, we will discuss issues such as literary representation and self-representation, cultural sovereignty, cultural authenticity, and community identity. The diverse regional, religious, and cultural contexts that inform these novels provide a broad variety of perspectives on what W. E. B. Du Bois called in 1903 the problem of the twentieth century: the color line or, more specifically for this class, the color lines that these authors erase, negotiate, and, often, reconstruct in old and new ways.

Texts: Anzia Yezierska, Bread Givers (1925); William Faulkner, Light in August (1932); Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye (1970); Sherman Alexie, Reservation Blues (1995); Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake (2003); Nina Maria Martinez, Caramba! (2004).

Grading: Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way:  40% total for five reading responses of two pages each; 40% total for two formal essays of three pages each; 20% total for class participation and reading response presentation. Attendance: Required. Excessive absences (more than 5) will adversely influence your final grade.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 377K • American Novel After 1920-W

35045 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 800-900 PAR 204
show description

 

 

Dr. James Cox
Office: CAL 14
Office Phone: 232-7804
E-mail: jhcox@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours: MW 7:00-7:50, MW 9:00-9:50, and by appointment

English 377K: The American Novel After 1920 (W)
MWF 8:00-8:50 P.M.
PAR 204
Spring 2010

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The many enduring contacts and conflicts between culturally and ethnically diverse communities have always been of interest to American novelists.  In this class, we will consider the contributions to this literary history made by authors who place these contacts and conflicts at the center of their work.  In our consideration of the novels on the reading list, we will discuss issues such as literary representation and self-representation, cultural sovereignty, cultural authenticity, and community identity.  The diverse regional, religious, and cultural contexts that inform these novels provide a broad variety of perspectives on what W. E. B. Du Bois called in 1903 the problem of the twentieth century: the color line or, more specifically for this class, the color lines that these authors erase, negotiate, and, often, reconstruct in old and new ways.

TEXTS:

William Faulkner, Light in August (1932)
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)
Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye (1970)
Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake (2003)
Nina Maria Martinez, ¡Caramba! (2004)
Sherman Alexie, Flight (2007)
Casares, Oscar. Amigoland (2008)

CLASS REQUIREMENTS:

ATTENDANCE:

You should plan to attend every class. Excessive absences (more than 5) will lower your final grade one full letter. Please do not be late to class, as being late is disruptive and disrespectful to your classmates, and please do not bring laptop computers to class.

PRESENTATION:

I will ask each one of you to facilitate class discussion one day during the semester. For this assignment, please plan to speak for 5-10 minutes solely about the reading assignment for that day. There are several possible formats for your presentation, but your main goal should be to share your thoughts and questions about the reading.

TWO-PAGE ESSAYS:

Four (4) two-page, double-spaced analyses of four (4) different reading assignments of your choice. The short essays should be explorations of very specific questions, concerns, insights, observations, etc., that you have about the readings. Your discussion might focus on aesthetic (formal), historical, and/or cultural (gender, religious, political) concerns, for example. You are welcome to ask me for suggestions about what ideas to explore in these essays, though I strongly encourage you to make these decisions on your own. These short essays can be developed into one of the longer essays. PLEASE SEE SHORT ESSAY DUE DATES IN THE DAILY CLASS SCHEDULE BELOW.

FOUR-PAGE ESSAYS:

Two (2) four-page, double-spaced analyses of a specific issue (literary, cultural, historical, political, etc.) or problem in one of the works we are reading.  These papers should include an introduction with a clear, specific thesis and a general outline of your argument and its main points.  In addition, the writing should be clearly focused, well-organized, well-polished, and demonstrate careful reading of the text/s that you discuss.  Please use one-inch margins and twelve-point type, preferably Times New Roman, and correct MLA format.  PLEASE SEE THE LONGER ESSAY DUE DATES IN THE DAILY CLASS SCHEDULE BELOW.

EIGHT-PAGE ESSAY OPTION:

You have the option of writing one eight-page essay rather than two four-page essays. The requirements other than the page length are the same. If you choose this option, your essay is due on either one of the four-page essay due dates.

For those of you who are concerned about your writing, determined to earn a high grade in the class, and/or interested in working on your writing skills, I will read rough drafts of your papers.  In addition, I have graded papers in my office from other classes that you can read in order to get some sense of how I grade.

*GRADES: 

Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way:

  • Four 2-page essays – 40% total
  • Two 4-page essays OR one 8-page essay – 40% total
  • Attendance, class participation (quality and quantity), presentation – 20% total

*Plus/minus grades will not be assigned.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 379N • Interwar Us Literature-Hon-W

35095 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 MEZ 1.102
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Dr. James Cox
Office: CAL 14
Office Phone: 232-7804
E-mail: jhcox@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours: MW 7:00-7:50, MW 9:00-9:50, and by appointment

English 379N: Interwar US Literature (W)
MWF 10:00-10:50 P.M.
MEZ 1.104
Spring 2010

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course takes as its purview novels published by US writers in the 1920s and 1930s. The vexed and vibrant interwar period includes the Jazz Age and the Great Depression as well as the publication of major works by Nobel Prize-winning authors Pearl Buck, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Eugene O'Neill, Sinclair Lewis, and John Steinbeck. This period was also the golden age of detective fiction. The required readings offer a geographically diverse range of works: Faulkner's Mississippi; Hemingway's France and Spain; Hurston's Florida; Larsen's Chicago, New York, and Denmark; Downing's Mexico; McNickle's Montana; Niggli's Mexico; West's Los Angeles; and Wright's Chicago. We will place these works in their regional, national, and historical contexts, consider their stylistic innovations, and attend particularly to questions of class and race. Visits to the Harry Ransom Center, which has substantial collections from this period, will also be a part of the course.

TEXTS:

Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises (1926)
Larsen, Nella. Quicksand (1928) and Passing (1929)
Faulkner, William. As I Lay Dying (1930)
Downing, Todd. Murder on the Tropic (1935)
McNickle, D'Arcy. The Surrounded (1936)
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)
West, Nathanael. The Day of the Locust (1939)
Wright, Richard. Native Son (1940)
Niggli, Josefina. Mexican Village (1945)

CLASS REQUIREMENTS:

ATTENDANCE: You should plan to attend every class. Excessive absences (more than 5) will lower your final grade one full letter. Please do not be late to class, as being late is disruptive and disrespectful to your classmates, and please do not bring laptop computers to class.

PRESENTATION: I will ask each one of you to facilitate class discussion one day during the semester. For this assignment, please plan to speak for 5-10 minutes solely about the reading assignment for that day. There are several possible formats for your presentation, but your main goal should be to share your thoughts and questions about the reading.

TWO-PAGE ESSAYS: Four (4) two-page, double-spaced analyses of four (4) different reading assignments of your choice. The short essays should be explorations of very specific questions, concerns, insights, observations, etc., that you have about the readings. Your discussion might focus on aesthetic (formal), historical, and/or cultural (gender, religious, political) concerns, for example. You are welcome to ask me for suggestions about what ideas to explore in these essays, though I strongly encourage you to make these decisions on your own. These short essays can be developed into one of the longer essays. PLEASE SEE SHORT ESSAY DUE DATES IN THE DAILY CLASS SCHEDULE BELOW.

FOUR-PAGE ESSAYS: Two (2) four-page, double-spaced analyses of a specific issue (literary, cultural, historical, political, etc.) or problem in one of the works we are reading.  These papers should include an introduction with a clear, specific thesis and a general outline of your argument and its main points.  In addition, the writing should be clearly focused, well-organized, well-polished, and demonstrate careful reading of the text/s that you discuss.  Please use one-inch margins and twelve-point type, preferably Times New Roman, and correct MLA format.  PLEASE SEE THE LONGER ESSAY DUE DATES IN THE DAILY CLASS SCHEDULE BELOW.

EIGHT-PAGE ESSAY OPTION: You have the option of writing one eight-page essay rather than two four-page essays. The requirements other than the page length are the same. If you choose this option, your essay is due on either one of the four-page essay due dates.

For those of you who are concerned about your writing, determined to earn a high grade in the class, and/or interested in working on your writing skills, I will read rough drafts of your papers.  In addition, I have graded papers in my office from other classes that you can read in order to get some sense of how I grade.

*GRADES: 

Your overall grade will be calculated in the following way:
     Four 2-page essays – 40% total
     Two 4-page essays OR one 8-page essay – 40% total
     Attendance, class participation (quality and quantity), presentation – 20% total

*Plus/minus grades will not be assigned.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34355-34410 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 JES A121A
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Dr. James Cox
Office: CAL 14
Office Phone: 232-7804
E-mail: jhcox@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours: MWF 9:00-9:50 and by appointment
E316K: Masterworks of Literature–American
MWF 10:00–10:50
JES A121A
Fall 2009

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is a broad survey of American literature from its origins to the present. In order to explore the diversity of American experiences as represented in writing, we will read works by African American, Chicana/o (Mexican American), Chinese American, European (English, French, Spanish) American, and Native American authors. We will discuss many aspects (literary, cultural, historical, political) of each piece of writing on the syllabus, but one main
interest will be in the way that these authors explore what being "American" means both to them and the community or communities that they represent. I will also provide some historical and cultural materials to help place the readings in context. In addition to familiarizing yourself with these important and compelling pieces of writing, a primary goal will be for you to practice becoming close, critical readers.

For further information, please download the full syllabus.

E 379S • Senior Seminar-W

35340 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 800-900 PAR 204
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TBD

Publications

Books

The Red Land to the South: American Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

Muting White Noise: Native American and European American Novel Traditions. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2006. [Second printing, 2009]

Books Edited

“Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature” co-edited with Daniel Heath Justice. Forthcoming from Oxford University Press, 2014. 682 pp.


Articles

“The Cross and the Harvest Dance: Lynn Riggs’ and James Hughes’ A Day in Santa Fe.” Forthcoming in Quarterly Review of Film and Video.

“‘Learn to Talk Yaqui’: Mexico and the Cherokee Literary Politics of Will Rogers and John Milton Oskison.” Western American Literature 48.4 (Winter 2014): 401-21.

"Mexican Indigenismo, Choctaw Self-Determination, and Todd Downing's Detective Novels." American Quarterly 62.3 (September 2010): 639-61.

"Indigenous Nationhood and Intertribal Kinship in Todd Downing's The Mexican Earth." MELUS 33.1 (Spring 2008): 75-92.

"The Power of Sympathy: European American Women Novelists Imagine Indigenous Absence." ATQ: 19th Century American Literature and Culture 15.3 (2001): 191-207.

"'All This Water Imagery Must Mean Something': Thomas King's Revisions of Narratives of Domination and Conquest in Green Grass, Running Water." American Indian Quarterly 24.2 (2000): 219-46.

"Muting White Noise: The Subversion of Popular Culture Narratives of Conquest in Sherman Alexie's Fiction." Studies in American Indian Literatures 9.4 (1997): 52-70.

Book Chapters

"Thomas King, Indian Policy, and American Indian Activism.” Thomas King: Works and Impacts. Ed. Eva Gruber. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2012. 224-37.

"Tribal Nations and the Other Territories of American Indian Literary History." A Companion to American Literary Studies. Ed. Caroline F. Levander and Robert S. Levine. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. 356-72.

"This Is What It Means to Say Reservation Cinema: Making Cinematic Indians in Smoke Signals." Sherman Alexie: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Jan Roush and Jeff Berglund. Logan: University of Utah Press, 2010. 74-94.

"'Yours for the Indian Cause': Gertrude Bonnin's Activist Editing at The American Indian Magazine, 1915-1919." Blue Pencils and Hidden Hands: Women Editing Periodicals, 1830-1910. Ed. Sharon M. Harris. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 2004. 173-201.

Reprints

“Mexican Indigenismo, Choctaw Self-Determination, and Todd Downing’s Detective Novels.” Alternative Contact: Indigeneity, Globalism, and American Studies. Ed. Paul Lai and Lindsey Claire Smith. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 2011. 233-55.

“Muting White Noise: The Subversion of Popular Culture Narratives of Conquest in Sherman Alexie’s Fiction.” Native American Writing. Vol. 3. Ed. A. Robert Lee. London: Routledge, 2011. 3-19.

“Muting White Noise: The Subversion of Popular Culture Narratives of Conquest in Sherman Alexie’s Fiction.” Approaching Literature: Writing, Reading, Thinking. Second Edition. Ed. Peter Schakel and Jack Ridl. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2008. 283-8. [Third edition, 2012]

“Muting White Noise: The Subversion of Popular Culture Narratives of Conquest in Sherman Alexie’s Fiction.” Short Story Criticism, Vol. 107. Ed. Jelena Krstovic. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale/Cengage, 2008. 10-20.

Review Essays

“The Native Critics Collective on the Past, Present, and Possible Futures of American Indian Literary Studies.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 20.2 (2008): 102-12.

Reviews

Susan Kalter, ed., Twenty Thousand Mornings: An Autobiography, by John Joseph Mathews. Western American Literature 47.4 (Winter 2013): 439-40.

Phillip H. Round, Removable Type: Histories of the Book in Indian Country, 1663-1880. Textual Cultures 7.2 (2012): 125-7.

Robert Dale Parker, ed., The Sound the Stars Make Rushing Through the Sky: The Writings of Jane Johnston Schoolcraft. Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 25.1 (2008): 168-69.

Kenneth Lincoln, Native American Renaissance. E3W Review of Books (2008): 85-86.

Frances Washburn, Elsie’s Business. E3W Review of Books (2006): 66-67.

Franchot Ballinger, Living Sideways: Tricksters in American Indian Oral Traditions. MELUS 30.2 (2005): 252-55.

Elvira Pulitano, Toward a Native American Critical Theory. American Indian Quarterly 29.1&2 (2005): 316-21.

Ruth Spack, America’s Second Tongue: American Indian Education and the Ownership of English, 1860-1900. Studies in American Indian Literatures. 16.1 (2004): 81-84.

Arnold Krupat, Red Matters: Native American Studies. Great Plains Quarterly 23.4 (2003): 271-72.

R. David Edmunds, ed., The New Warriors: Native American Leaders Since 1900. Studies in American Indian Literatures 15.2 (2003): 76-79.

Gilberto Chavez Ballejos and Shirley Hill Witt, El Indio Jesus: A Novel. Studies in American Indian Literatures 14.4 (2002): 51-54.

Susan Berry Brill de Ramirez, Contemporary American Indian Literatures & the Oral Tradition. Great Plains Quarterly 20.3 (2000): 239-40.

Joy Harjo and Gloria Bird, eds., Reinventing the Enemy’s Language: Contemporary Native Women’s Writings of North America. Prairie Schooner 73.1 (1999): 184-88.

James J. Rawls, Chief Red Fox is Dead: A History of Native Americans Since 1945. Great Plains Quarterly 18.1 (1998): 56-57.

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