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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Hannah C Wojciehowski

Professor Ph.D., 1984, Yale University

Hannah C Wojciehowski

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Biography

I am an early modernist and literary theorist who specializes in the history of subjectivity.  I completed my Ph.D. at Yale University in the interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies Program (1984).  I am currently Professor of English at the University of Texas and an Affiliate of the Program in Comparative Literature.

My research interests are multiple.  My 2011 book Group Identity in the Renaissance World explores the history of what I call "group subjectivity.”  Drawing on the psychoanalytic theories of Freud and Anzieu, and the social network theory of Georg Simmel, this book analyzes the unconscious dynamics of group identity formation in a global context, offering a new paradigm for the study of pre-modernity.  Click on the "Global Renaissance Studies" tab to learn more about this research, and about the amazing resources available for such study available at the University of Texas.  

This study of collective fantasies as the organizing ‘containers’ of groups has applications for other historical periods, as well, including the recent past.  My current research on the life and writings of Michel Foucault during the late Sixties, and on his highly influential theories of power, brings the study of groups from the early modern world to the post-modern. 

New information about the nature of the human mind and about individual and collective identity is being generated at a rapid pace by the sciences, including cognitive and social neuroscience.  A growing number of scholars in the humanities are drawing on this new research in order to rethink the theoretical models for subjectivity and intersubjectivity that held sway during the twentieith century--for example, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, structuralism and post-structuralism.  The emergent field of Cognitive-Affective Cultural Studies holds great promise for advancing our shared understanding of the human mind and our social world, and the nature of creativity. 

I have recently edited Shakespeare’s Cymbeline for the New Kittredge Shakespeare Series, which will be published in 2014 by Focus Pullins.  This edition of the play includes performance notes—one of the special features of the series--and relies on film and stage productions of Cymbeline to introduce the reader to one of Shakespeare’s most engaging romances.

My other research interests include the history of gender and sexuality, early modern women’s writing, Tudor and Jacobean theater, travel narratives and sixteenth-century colonialism, the impact of science and technology on literature, and vice versa, and the history and practice of literary criticism and theory. 

Awards (selected):

  • University Research Institute Faculty Research Award (2013)
  • University of Texas Humanities Research Award (2013-2015)
  • President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award (2011)
  • Faculty Fellow, Humanities Institute, University of Texas (2009)
  • University Research Institute Faculty Research Award (2008)
  • Raymond Dickson Centennial Endowed Teaching Fellowship (2007-2008)
  • Dads Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship (2004-2005)
  • Rockefeller Resident Fellowship, Institute for the Study of Violence, Survival, and Culture, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (2002)
  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship, Huntington Library (2001)
  • K. Garth Huston and Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow, Huntington Library (2000)
  • Pforzheimer Fellowship, Humanities Research Center, University of Texas (1999)

Affiliated Research/Academic Unit:

Center for European Studies

Center for Women's and Gender Studies 

South Asia Institute

 

 

E 350E • Cannibal Renaissance

35830 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 221
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Instructor:  Wojciehowski, H

Unique #:  35830

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  English Honors

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Early modern European narratives reporting on the so-called New World and its inhabitants provide strange and fascinating glimpses of cross-cultural encounters. Represented in these writings are conflicting beliefs and fantasies about the world and its diverse peoples; these would have a profound impact on virtually every culture around the globe, as our own modern world came into being.  In this course we will study several important 15th- and 16th-century accounts of travel, encounter, conquest, in order to understand how the creative phenomenon called the Renaissance was closely tied to the global circulation and redistribution of material goods, knowledge and ideas; the enforced labor or enslavement of large groups of people; and genocide.

In this course will focus on one particular fantasy and reality that runs through numerous European travel narratives of this time period:  namely, the cannibal.  How did tales of New World cannibalism shape Europeans’ views of the terra incognita to the west, and how were such tales used to justify colonialism?  How did American natives receive and react to the fantasies that were projected onto them during the early colonial era?  How did imagined and real acts cannibalism, some performed by Europeans, shape their views of themselves? What was the phenomenon that I call “the cannibal imagination,” and why does it persist even day?  These are some of the primary questions to be considered in this Honors Seminar.

Our reading selections include a remarkable early piece of North American (and, loosely speaking, Texan) literature: Cabeza de Vaca’s Relation; Léry’s ambivalent account of his visits with cannibal tribes of Brazil; Staden’s hair-raising story of being held in captivity and his near-cannibalization; the De Bry family’s visual narratives of New World natives, including cannibal tribes (a precursor to graphic novels—and I do mean graphic); and Shakespeare’s The Tempest, anearly 17th-century homage to the cannibal on the eve of his disappearance.

Students in this course will be asked to contribute a paragraph responding to the readings for each class on the group’s discussion board, a 5-6 page interpretive essay, a 10-12 page research paper, and two oral reports.  They will also be asked to make use of the extensive collections of early modern books at the HRC and Benson libraries.  Two class visits will be held in those collections.

About languages:  Many of the texts in this course were not originally written in English.  Students who know other European languages will be encouraged to read these works in the original, though I will order top English translations.

About the workload:  There is one.

Primary Texts: Columbus, Diary of the First Voyage; Chanca, Letter from the Second Voyage; Vespucci, The New World; Four Voyages; Las Casas, Brief History of the Destruction of the Indies; Cabeza de Vaca, Relation; Léry, History of a Voyage to the Land of Brasil; Staden, True History of his Captivity; Montaigne, “Of Cannibals”; De Bry, Grands Voyages; Raleigh, Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana; Hakluyt, Voyages (excerpts); Shakespeare, The Tempest.

Plus a packet of historical and analytical companion readings on the history and literature of cannibalism, including excerpts from the following: C. Levi-Strauss, The Savage Mind; W. Arens, The Man-Eating Myth; F. Lestringant, Cannibals; S. Greenblatt, Learning to Curse; S. Greenblatt, ed., New World Encounters; S. Wilson, Archaeology of the Caribbean; M. Kilgore, From Communion to Cannibalism; H. Wojciehowski, Group Identity in the Renaissance World.

Filmic component: “Cabeza de Vaca” (1991) dir. Nicolás Echevarría; “Even the Rain” (2010) dir. Icíar Bollaín; “How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman” (1971), dir. Nelson Pereira dos Santos; “Quilombo” (1974), dir. Carlos Diegues; “The Tempest” (2010), dir. Julie Taymor; plus the added bonus film “Avatar” (2009), dir. James Cameron.

Assignments & Grading Structure: Daily discussion board, 25%; 5-6 page essay, 15%; First oral report, 10%; Second oral report, 10%; Research paper, 25%; Quizzes and participation, 15%.

E 392M • Imagintn, Columbus/Shakespeare

36105 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 310
(also listed as C L 381 )
show description

"There is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism."

                                                      --Walter Benjamin, “Theses on the Philosophy of History"

Early modern European narratives reporting on the so-called New World and its inhabitants provide strange and fascinating glimpses of cross-cultural encounters. Represented in these writings are conflicting beliefs and fantasies about the world and its diverse peoples; these would have a profound impact on virtually every culture around the globe, as the modern world came into being.  In this course we will study several important 15th- and 16th-century accounts of travel, encounter and conquest, in order to understand how the creative phenomenon called the Renaissance was closely tied to the global circulation and redistribution of material goods, knowledge and ideas; the enforced labor or enslavement of large groups of people; and genocide.

In this course will focus on one particular fantasy and reality that runs through numerous European travel narratives of this time period:  namely, the cannibal.  How did tales of New World cannibalism shape Europeans’ views of the terra incognita to the west, and how were such tales used to justify colonialism?  How did American natives receive and react to the fantasies that were projected onto them during the early colonial era?  How did imagined and real acts cannibalism, some performed by Europeans, shape their views of themselves? What was the phenomenon that I call “the cannibal imagination,” and why does it persist even day?  These are some of the primary questions to be considered in this course.

Our reading selections include a remarkable early piece of North American (and, loosely speaking, Texan) literature: Cabeza de Vaca’s Relation; Léry’s ambivalent account of his visits with cannibal tribes of Brazil; Staden’s hair-raising story of being held in captivity and his near-cannibalization; the De Bry family’s visual narratives of New World natives, including cannibal tribes (a precursor to graphic novels—and I do mean graphic); and Shakespeare’s The Tempest, anearly 17th-century homage to the cannibal on the eve of his disappearance.

Students in this course will be asked to write a 5-6 page interpretive essay, a 15-25 page research paper, and one oral report.  They will also be asked to make use of the extensive collections of early modern books at the HRC and Benson libraries.  Two class visits will be held in those collections.

About languages:  Many of the texts in this course were not originally written in English.  Students who know other European languages will be encouraged to read these works in the original, though I will order top English translations.

Primary Texts:

Columbus, Diary of the First Voyage

Chanca, Letter from the Second Voyage.

Vespucci, The New World; Four Voyages

Las Casas, Brief History of the Destruction of the Indies

Cabeza de Vaca, Relation

Léry, History of a Voyage to the Land of Brasil

Staden, True History of his Captivity

Montaigne, “Of Cannibals”

De Bry, Grands Voyages

Raleigh, Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana

Hakluyt, Voyages (excerpts)

Shakespeare, The Tempest

Plus a packet of historical and analytical companion readings on the history and literature of cannibalism, including excerpts from the following:

  • C. Levi-Strauss, The Savage Mind
  • W. Arens, The Man-Eating Myth
  • F. Lestringant, Cannibal Encounters
  • S. Greenblatt, Learning to Curse
  • S. Greenblatt, ed., New World Encounters
  • S. Wilson, Archaeology of the Caribbean
  • M. Kilgore, From Communion to Cannibalism
  • H. Wojciehowski, Group Identity in the Renaissance World

Filmic component: 

“Cabeza de Vaca” (1991) dir. Nicolás Echevarría

“Even the Rain” (2010) dir. Icíar Bollaín

“How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman” (1971), dir. Nelson Pereira dos Santos

“Quilombo” (1974), dir. Carlos Diegues

“The Tempest” (2010), dir. Julie Taymor

“Avatar” (2009), dir. James Cameron

 

E 393M • How Stories Make Us Feel

36345 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm CAL 323
(also listed as C L 382 )
show description

This course is designed as an introduction to cognitive/affective cultural studies, a recent body of theory that has arisen at the intersection(s) between literary narratology, neuroscience, phenomenology, cognitive psychology, and many other fields.  These remarkable conversations have opened up new perspectives on classic questions of subjectivity and intersubjectivity, including the following:

• What is empathy, and what are its underlying neural mechanisms?

• How are empathy and social identification related?

• Under what conditions does empathy fail?

• What is embodied Theory of Mind, and how does it differ from earlier models of human consciousness, especially psychoanalysis?

• What do literature and other art forms reveal about the human mind and its workings?

• What are the possible relations between narrative art and “real life”?

• Does art save lives, ‘humanize’ us, or make us better people, however we might define ‘better’?

In this course we will explore this rich terrain, reading some of the most influential and speculative of recent theorists of embodied mind, including Antonio Damasio, V. S. Ramachandran, Shaun Gallagher, Vittorio Gallese and Marco Iacoboni. We will also read philosophers, scientists and literary scholars who are theorizing empathy.  And, most importantly for our purposes, we will read and study works by literary theorists who have taken the ‘cognitive turn’ (or cognitive-affective turn) in order to understand how this emergent critical paradigm is transforming our field. These include Suzanne Keen, Patrick Colm Hogan, Elizabeth Grosz, Alan Palmer, Alan Richardson, Elaine Scarry, Ellen Spolsky, Blakey Vermeule, Robin Warhol, and Lisa Zunshine.

In addition to studying a cross-disciplinary dialogue with huge stakes for basically everybody, we will also consider the relation of this very recent body of scholarship to precursor theories of empathy and identification.  Hence, in our class discussions, we will think of ways to relate these recent works to other literary theories that have explored the problems of intersubjectivity, identification and dis-identification--including Girardian narratology, feminisms, queer and gender theory; trauma theory; post-colonialisms; performance theory, and psychoanalyses.

This course will provide students with a number of useful tools for thinking about literary texts, cultural history, and interdisciplinarity.  It is designed to explore the right now of theory—something which literary criticism and theory anthologies generally neglect to do.  It is also designed to explore each student’s disparate exposures to literary theory and to bring them into synthesis.  It is both a focused exploration and a broad survey; there is much that we will, of necessity, leave out.

Literary texts and films to be studied:

Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

Wm. Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale

Van Jordan, M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A

Marcel Proust, Swann’s Way

Alfred Hitchcock, “Notorious”

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

35475 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 103
show description

Instructor:  Wojciehowski, H            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35475            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In this course, specially designed for the needs and constraints of summer school, we will be doing what most of us would like to be doing anyway—i.e., reading great works of literary fiction. We will be studying a wide variety of short stories written by authors from around the world (composed in English or translated from their original languages into English). Simultaneously we will study basic principles of storytelling and writing, focusing on questions of narrative technique, point-of-view, figurative language, emplotment and genre, and other formal considerations of this particular literary format. We will also study the philosophical questions raised by these stories, as well as the cultural specificities of individual work. Students are invited to join this highly enjoyable yet challenging course, which will feature some of the very best of twentieth- and twenty-first century short stories.

Texts: The Art of the Story: An International Anthology of Contemporary Short Stories, ed. Daniel Halpern (Penguin: 2000); Course packet with additional readings.

Requirements & Grading: periodic pop quizzes, 10%; 3 interpretive essays, 3-4 pages, 20% each; 1 short story by each of you, 5-6 pages, 20%; class participation, 10%.

Attendance is essential. Students must come to class prepared to discuss the day’s readings. More than three absences will substantially affect a student’s grade for the semester; more than five absences will result in a failing grade for the course.

E 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

35695 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 201
show description

Instructor:  Wojciehowski, H            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35695            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  English Honors

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Enrollment in or completion of at least one Honors section of an English course, admission to the English Honors Program, and consent of the honors adviser. Enrollment restricted by department.

Description: According to the Honors Thesis Manual, a thesis is “a sustained examination of a central idea or question, developed in a professional and mature manner under the guidance of a faculty supervisor and a second reader.” That sounds easy enough, but how does one get there from here? This course offers something of a roadmap. Over the course of the term we will examine literary criticism from the “inside out” and hone skills essential to a successful honors thesis.

Along the way, we will address a number of questions, both practical—How do I use the MLA Bibliography? What’s the difference between a footnote and an endnote?—and theoretical—What counts as a valid argument about a literary work? What is the relation between literature and theory? Theory and practice? This course will: first and foremost prepare students to write an honors thesis. Members of this course will explore various methods of literary and cultural interpretation, consider what it means to conduct literary research, and learn how to take their research and writing to new levels of expertise.

Texts: Required Core Texts:  Tom Stoppard, Arcadia (Faber and Faber, 1994).  0571169341A. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, ed. and trans. Burton Raffel (Signet, 2009).  0451531191. Required Secondary Texts: Wayne Booth, et al, The Craft of Research (Third Edition) (University Of Chicago Press, 2008). #978-0226065663; Marjorie Garber, A Manifesto for Literary Studies (University of Washington Press, 2003). #978-0295983448; Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing (Norton, 2005). # 978-0393924091.

Optional Supplementary Text: Eviatar Zerubavel, The Clockwork Muse: A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations, & Books (Harvard, 1999) #0-674-13586-5; Richard Bullock and Francine Weinberg, The Little Seagull (Norton, 2011). 039311519.

Requirements & Grading: (assignment logistics, rationales, and approaches will be discussed at length during class)

Final Thesis Prospectus (4-6 pp.) & Annotated Bibliography (20-25+ items)            30%

Writing Sample (15-20 pp. section or sections of your actual thesis)            30%

In-Class Performance (quality & consistency of discussion; preparation; engagement;

informal writing; writing-process & bibliography tasks; peer feedback; Symposium)            30%

On-time Completion of Reading, Writing-Process, Research, & Peer Feedback Assignments            10%

On-time Attendance (note: every absence beginning with #4 will reduce grade; NC at #9)            Required

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade of the course. The university does not recognize the grade of A+. Evaluation percentages approximate & subject to minor change.

E 384K • Approaches To Disciplnry Inqus

35775 • Fall 2012
Meets W 600pm-900pm SZB 422
show description

This course will allow students to gain a fuller sense for the complexity and variety of research methods available to literary scholars. We will spend the semester thinking about literary and cultural criticism from the inside out—that is, we will be reading and discussing the methodological and argumentative moves that scholars make. Along the way we will ask a number of urgent questions: How do scholars read now—and how did they read then? What is the status of theory in twenty-first century literary studies? How does the fall out from the so-called “culture wars” inform and inflect current practices? What do we talk about when we talk about archival research? What would it mean to “always historicize”? Finally, what are the relations between our roles as writers and professionals? The conversation engendered by such questions will better position students to embark on Master’s Report and dissertation research. The course will also: introduce the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and other collections-based resources; offer a shared, “cohort” experience for all second-year graduate students; help said students further orient themselves to both the department and the profession.

E F314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

83585 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Wojciehowski, H            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  83585            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Members of this class will read a variety of literary and philosophical works that have either been banned or censored, or that discuss and analyze some form of censorship. The goals of this course are several. Students will explore the controversies around these works: Why have some critics considered them dangerous or dreadful? Why have others judged them to be important or even great books? How is the value of these works bound up with problems that they once posed and perhaps continue to pose with certain audiences? More generally, how does the very act of reading, when accomplished individually or collectively, involve a set of value negotiations between writers, audiences, and authorities?

Students will address specific forms of censorship controversies, past and present, by reading pairs or groups of works that together help bring an issue into focus—e.g., religion and censorship, or censorship and the selection of high school textbooks. Students will also be asked to write two papers. In addition there will be two exams and occasional reading quizzes.

Texts (subject to change): Plato: selected dialogues; Galileo Galilei, Letter to the Grand Duchess Cristina; Bertolt Brecht, Galileo; Salinger, Catcher in the Rye; Lillian Hellman, The Children’s Hour and Scoundrel Time; Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings; Nuruddin Farah, Maps.

Requirements & Grading: First 5-page paper, 20%; Second 5-page paper, 20%; First exam, 20%; Second exam, 20%; Oral Report, 10%; Quizzes, 10%.

E 392M • Medieval-Renais Women Writers

35670 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as MDV 392M )
show description

Medieval-Renaissance Women Writers

In this course we will survey a wide range of pre-modern women writers who composed in English or who influenced the English and American literary canons.  Beginning with the romances of the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman poet Marie de France, and ending with the poetry of African-American poet Phyllis Wheatley, this course traces the broad arc of women’s literary and cultural contributions across six centuries and two continents.  In addition to encountering some of the principal figures in this tradition, we will study a sizeable number of literary genres, including narrative poetry, autobiography or personal memoir, oratory, drama, lyric poetry and poetic translation, polemic and satire, and religious meditation.

A further goal of the course will be to contextualize these authors and their works by understanding how their writings have been received over the centuries, when their works entered the canon of British and American literature, and why scholarly and not-so-scholarly debates surrounded many of these women and their creations. Several of the texts that we will read together were considered influential defenses of women’s intellects, creativity, morality, and rights at the time they were written, and retroactively they have been perceived as noteworthy feminist or proto-feminist statements.  Hence a further topic of our study will be to consider the influence of these works on later feminist history, theory, and social activism.  Finally we will study the rise of the academic field of medieval and early modern women’s cultural history, in order to understand its relation to the larger field of Women’s Studies and, more broadly, to the history of feminist thought.

Students will be asked to do one oral presentation, one five-to-seven page essay, a one-page response paper each week, and one 15-25-page research paper (which can be a longer version of shorter essays written for the course).

Writers and texts to be studied in this course:

Marie de France, Lais

Julian of Norwich, Book of Showings

Margery Kempe, Book of Margery Kempe

Christine de Pisan, Book of the City of Ladies

Louise Labé, sonnets

Elizabeth I, selected writings

Isabella Whitney, A Sweet Nosgay

Amelia Lanyer, Salve Deus, Rex Judaeorum

Elizabeth Cary, Tragedy of Miriam

Mary Sidney, The Sidney Psalter

Mary Wroth, Urania

Jane Anger, Ester Sowernam, Rachel Specht, pamphlet wars

Elizabeth Jocelin, A Mother’s Legacy to her Unborn Child

Anna Trapnel, The Cry of a Stone

Alice Thorton, Autobiography

Margaret Cavendish, The Blazing World

Ann Bradstreet, selected works

Phyllis Wheatley, poems

Note to prospective students:  we will be reading abridged or excerpted versions of most of these works/collections.  This list may change a little bit by next spring.  We will be using the Norton Anthology of Literature by Women, Vol. I, and, in some cases, individual editions of some writers whom we will study in greater detail.  In addition, we will read selected critical and historical works each week that shed light on the primary texts for the course and on the field of medieval and early modern women’s studies.

E 336E • British Lit: Begin-Renaissance

35235 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 310
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 Description: Old stuff. For some, the ancient writings have as much appeal as something left in the back of the refrigerator for an indeterminate length of time. Instead you are invited to think of these works as rare elixirs. The bottles may be dusty and mysterious, their labels hand-written in strange, faded characters, but the contents are strong, delicious, and potentially transformative. How transformative? Take the class and find out. You are not likely to be disappointed.

The authors/texts to be studied in this course will include Beowulf; Anglo-Saxon and Celtic verse; Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls; Sir Gawain & the Green Knight; Julian of Norwich’s A Book of Showings; The Book of Margery Kempe; Marlory’s Le Morte d’Arthur; Shakespeare’s Hamlet and sonnets, and additional works by Skelton, Wyatt, Surrey, Marlowe, Raleigh, Herrick, Donne, Marvell, Lanyer and Queen Elizabeth I.

Requirements & Grading: First essay (3 pages), 15%; second essay (5 pages), 20%; third essay (research paper, 8-10 pages) 25%; first exam 20%; second exam 20%. On-time attendance (every absence after the third will reduce grade; NC at the ninth); on-time completion of all assignments required.

Texts: The Longman Anthology of British Literature, 1A and 1B (4th edition); Shakespeare’s Hamlet; Supplemental Course Packet.

E 379R • Renaissance Travel Narratives

35545 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 310
show description

E 379R (Topic: Renaissance Travel Narratives) and 379S (embedded topic: Renaissance Travel Narratives) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Early modern travel narratives are fascinating historical documents. They offer a wide array of perspectives on early modern colonialism; on national, ethnic, religious, and cultural differences; and on the global economy that developed during that era. Together they help the contemporary reader understand how the creative phenomenon called the Renaissance was partly the effect of a global redistribution of wealth produced by early modern colonialism. The increased circulation of material goods, knowledge and ideas, together with conflicting beliefs about the world and its diverse peoples, also had a profound impact on European cultures, as well as cultures around the world.

In this senior seminar we will study a broad sampling of European travel narratives written between the 15th and 17th centuries. These travel narratives tell remarkable stories, sometimes in highly crafted and rhetorically polished ways. Members of this course will be encouraged to study these intriguing texts as literary works, as well as historical documents and/or ethnographies. In this course, we will explore the impact of these early modern works on literary history—specifically their relation to the Renaissance genre of romance and to various modern genres, as well—both fictional and non-fictional.

Students in this course will also be asked to write a 1-2 page response paper, a 5-6 page interpretive essay and a 10-12-page research paper. They will also be encouraged to make use of the extensive collections of early modern books at the HRC and Benson libraries. 

Texts: Columbus, Diary of the First Voyage; Vespucci, The New World; Four Voyages; Leo Africanus, A Geographical History of Africa; More, Utopia; Cabeza de Vaca, Relation; Léry, History of a Voyage to the Land of Brasil; Mendes Pinto, Voyages; Raleigh, Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana; Hakluyt, Voyages (excerpts); Della Valle, The Travels of Pietro della Valle; Shakespeare, The Tempest; Plus a packet of literary critical and historical companion readings.

Requirements & Grading: 1-2 page response paper, 5%; 4-5 page essay, 15%; 1st peer review, 10%; Research paper, 30%; 2nd peer review, 10%; 1st exam, 15%; 2nd exam, 15%.

E F314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

83525 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 204
show description

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

 

Description: Members of this class will read a variety of literary and philosophical works that have either been banned or censored, or that discuss and analyze some form of censorship. The goals of this course are several. Students will explore the controversies around these works: Why have some critics considered them dangerous or dreadful? Why have others judged them to be important or even great books? How is the value of these works bound up with problems that they once posed and perhaps continue to pose with certain audiences? More generally, how does the very act of reading, when accomplished individually or collectively, involve a set of value negotiations between writers, audiences, and authorities?

 

Students will address specific forms of censorship controversies, past and present, by reading pairs or groups of works that together help bring an issue into focus—e.g., religion and censorship, or censorship and the selection of high school textbooks. Students will also be asked to write and revise two papers. In addition there will be two exams and reading quizzes.

 

Texts (subject to change): Plato: selected dialogues; Galileo Galilei, Letter to the Grand Duchess Cristina; Bertolt Brecht, Galileo; Lillian Hellman, Scoundrel Time; Salman Rushdie, Haroun and the Sea of Stories; Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings; Zhang Xianliang, Grass Soup; Nuruddin Farah, Maps.

 

Requirements & Grading: First 5-page paper, 20%; Second 5-page paper, 20%; First exam, 20%; Second exam, 20%; Participation, 10%; Quizzes, 10%.

E 379R • Dr Faustus In Thtr/Fict/Film

35820 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.118
show description

E 379R (Topic: Doctor Faust Legend in Theater, Fiction, and Film) and 379S (embedded topic: The Faust Legend in Theater, Fiction, and Film) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Once upon a time, there was this guy who wanted something bad. What he wanted he wanted so much that he would do anything to get it. Opportunity arose in the form of the devil, who tempted the man to make a deal. They drew up a contract, which the guy signed with his own blood. Wish granted, soul exchanged--the devil’s bargain. Short-term gain, long-term payback, second-guessing, counter-bargaining, teeth gnashing, wheels turning. Could anyone, including Dr. Faustus, outwit the devil, and outwit death in the bargain? Find out the answers, or at least the questions, from these famous and not-so-famous writers and filmmakers.

Texts: (subject to revision): Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Anonymous, Historia von D. Johann Fausten; Anna Bijns, Mary of Nijmeghen; Christopher Marlowe, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus; Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust; Dorothy Sayers, The Devil to Pay; Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita; Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Devil on the Cross.

Elaine Pagels, The Origin of Satan; Philip Zimbardo, The Lucifer Effect.

Films: Bedazzled, dir. Stanley Donen (1967); Mephisto, dir. István Szabó (1981); I Was a Teenage Faust, dir. Thom Eberhardt (2002); Fausto 5.0, dir. Isidro Ortiz, Alex Olle, Carlos Padrissa (2004).

Requirements & Grading: Participation, 10%; One short paper--5 pages (submitted in two drafts), 10%; Two peer critiques--1 to 2 pages, 10%; One research paper--10 pages (submitted in two drafts), 30%; Two exams, 40%.

E 393M • How Stories Make Us Feel

36015 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm CBA 4.336
(also listed as C L 382 )
show description

How Stories Make Us Feel:  The Cognitive Turn in Literary Studies
Hannah Chapelle Wojciehowski

Description:  This course is designed as an introduction to neurocriticism, a recent body of theory that has arisen at the intersection(s) between literary narratology, neuroscience, phenomenology, cognitive psychology, and many other fields.  This remarkable conversation has opened up new perspectives on classic questions of subjectivity and intersubjectivity, including the following:

• What is empathy, and what are its underlying neural mechanisms?
• How are empathy and social identification related?
• What is embodied Theory of Mind, and how does it differ from earlier models of human consciousness?
• What do literature and other art forms reveal about the human mind and its workings? 
• What are the possible relations between narrative art and “real life”? 
• Does art save lives, ‘humanize’ us, or make us better people, however we might define ‘better’?
• How does neurocriticism allow us to reconceptualize the traditional discourses of aesthetics?

In this course we will explore this rich terrain, reading some of the most influential and speculative of recent theorists of mind, including Antonio Damasio, V. S. Ramachandran, Andy Clark, George Lakoff, Mark Turner, and Mark Johnson, Giacomo Rizzolatti, Vittorio Gallese, Francisco Varela, Evan Thompson and Eleanor Rosch.  We will also read philosophers, scientists and literary scholars who are theorizing empathy, including Stephen Pinker, Shaun Gallagher, and Suzanne Keen.  And, most importantly for our purposes, we will read and study works by literary theorists who have taken the ‘cognitive turn’—among them Patrick Colm Hogan, Lisa Zunshine, Ellen Spolsky, Frederick Luis Aldama, Mary Thomas Crane, Alan Richardson, Elaine Scarry, and Robyn Warhol, and Alan Palmer, in order to understand how this emergent critical paradigm is transforming our field.

In addition to studying neurocriticism as an exciting cross-disciplinary dialogue with huge stakes for basically everybody, we will also consider the relation of this very recent body of scholarship to precursor theories of empathy and identification.  Hence, in our class discussions, we will think of ways to relate these recent works to other literary theories that have explored the problems of intersubjectivity, identification and dis-identification--including Bakhtinian and Girardian narratology, feminisms, queer and gender theory; trauma theory; post-colonialisms; performance theory, and psychoanalyses.

This course will provide students with a number of useful tools for thinking about literary texts, cultural history, and interdisciplinarity.  It is designed to explore the right now of theory—something which literary criticism and theory anthologies generally neglect to do.  It is also designed to explore each student’s disparate exposures to literary theory and to bring them into synthesis.  It is both a focused exploration and a broad survey; there is much that we will, of necessity, leave out.  

Partial reading list (most of these readings will be excerpted)
Alan Richardson and Ellen Spolsky, The Work of Fiction: Cognition, Culture, and Complexity
Lisa Zunshine, Strange Concepts and the Stories They Make Possible: Cognition, Culture, Narrative
Suzanne Keen, Empathy and the Novel
Shaun Gallagher, How the Body Shapes the Mind
Patrick Colm Hogan, The Mind and its Stories: Narrative Universals and Human Emotion
Robyn Warhol, Having a Good Cry: Effeminate Feelings and Pop-Culture Forms
Antonio Damasio, The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness
Vittorio Gallese, selected articles
V. F. Ramachandran, A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness: From Imposter Poodles to Purple Numbers
Giacomo Rizzolati and Corrado Sinigaglia, Mirrors in the Brain: How Our Minds Share Actions and Emotions

Virginia Woolf, The Waves
Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past (selections)
William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale
A. Van Jordan, M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A
Vikas Swarup, Q. & A.
Danny Boyle, dir., Slumdog Millionaire

Assignments and grading:
Meditations (one per class; one page each):  30%
1st paper (5 pages): 20%
2nd research paper (15-20 pages) 50%

E 321K • Introduction To Criticism

34485 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 310
show description

Course Description: Students in this course will learn about the history and practice of literary studies: what do critics do, why do they do what they do, how do they justify the positions they take? How has is literature usually taught in American universities today? How has this discipline been conceived of and taught in the past, and what kinds of changes might we predict for the future? A further goal of this course is to make explicit the kinds of interpretive activities that students and teachers have been doing all along. Whenever we read a book, poem, or essay; whenever we see a film or a visual work of art; whenever we venture an interpretation of any sort, then we are using some form of literary theory in order to make a judgment. Prospective students may think of this course as a way of understanding and clarifying what they already know, or what they might like to know in more detail. This course offers many ways to read, interpret, and evaluate literature; there will be some surprises. We will learn how different critical theories can be applied to virtually any cultural artifact. This course will concentrate on twentieth-century developments in literary theory, including formalisms, structuralism, deconstruction, feminist and gender theory, critical race studies, post-colonial theory, psychoanalysis, and narratology. In addition to providing an overview of the field, this course is designed to help students to write better and to develop their skills in critical reasoning and argumentation. And finally it is designed to help prepare students for graduate study.

Texts (tentative):
Leitch, ed.  The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism; Barthes, Mythologies; Derrida, On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness; Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time.

Grading:
One 3-page paper (3 drafts); One 3-page paper (2 drafts); One 6-8-page paper (2 drafts); Three 1-page peer critiques; Two exams.

Prerequisites:
Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

83080 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 206
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Course Description: In this course, specially designed for the needs and constraints of summer school, we will be doing what most of us would like to be doing anyway—i.e., reading great works of literary fiction. We will be studying a wide variety of short stories written by authors from around the world (composed in English or translated from their original languages into English). Simultaneously we will study basic principles of storytelling and writing, focusing on questions of narrative technique, point-of-view, figurative language, emplotment and genre, and other formal considerations of this particular literary format. We will also study the philosophical questions raised by these stories, as well as the cultural specificities of individual work. Students are invited to join this highly enjoyable yet challenging course, which will feature some of the very best of twentieth- and twenty-first century short stories.

Texts: The Art of the Story: An International Anthology of Contemporary Short Stories, ed. Daniel Halpern (Penguin: 2000); Course packet with additional readings.

Grading:

  • 8-10 pop quizzes, 15%
  • 2 interpretive essays, 3-4 pages, 20% ea.
  • 1 final essay 5-6 pages, 30%
  • class participation, 15%

Attendance is essential. Students must come to class prepared to discuss the day’s readings. More than three absences will substantially affect a student’s grade for the semester; more than five absences will result in a failing grade for the course.

Prerequisites: Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents (e.g., TC 603A & 603B), and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing.

E 379S • Senior Seminar-W

35165 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm MEZ 2.210
show description

Renaissance Travel Narratives

E 379S   35165
Dr. Hannah Wojciehowski
Mezes 2.210  MW 3:30-5:00                 
Office:  Parlin 227  ph. 1-8765
Office Hours:  MW 12:30-2:00   

 

Course Description:

Early modern travel narratives are fascinating historical documents.  They offer a wide array of perspectives on colonialism; on national, ethnic, religious, and cultural differences; and on the global economy that developed during that era.  Together they help the contemporary reader understand how the creative phenomenon called the Renaissance was partly the effect of a global circulation and redistribution of material goods, knowledge and ideas.  Conflicting beliefs about the world and its diverse peoples also had a profound impact on the evolution and transformation of European cultures, and of many other cultures around the world, as the modern world-system came into being. 

In this senior seminar we will study a broad sampling of European travel narratives written between the 15th and 17th centuries, as well as some non-European narratives from the same era.  These travel narratives tell remarkable stories, sometimes in highly crafted and rhetorically polished ways.  Members of this course will be encouraged to study these intriguing texts as literary works, as well as historical documents and/or ethnographies. In this course, we will explore the impact of these early modern works on literary history—specifically their relation to the Renaissance genre of romance and to various modern genres, as well—both fictional and non-fictional.  

Students in this course will write a 1-2 page response paper, a 4-5 page interpretive essay and a 10-12 page research paper.  They will also be encouraged to make use of the extensive collections of early modern books at the HRC and Benson libraries. 

Texts for this Course:

  1. J. M. Cohen, ed., Christopher Columbus: The Four Voyages (Penguin, 1969).*  Reserves.
  2. Luciano Formisano, ed., Vespucci: Letters from a New World(Marsilio, 1992).  Course packet/E Reserves/ Reserves.
  3. George Logan and Robert Adams, More: Utopia(Cambridge: 1989).*  Reserves.
  4. Leo Africanus, A Geographical Historie of Africa(1600; EEBO [free to UT students]).
  5. Rolena Adorno and Patrick Charles Pautz, ed., The Narrative of Cabeza de Vaca(Nebraska, 2003). *Reserves.
  6. Franklin Knight, ed., Bartolomé de las Casas: An Account, Much Abbreviated, of the Destruction of the Indies, with Related Texts(Hackett: 2003).*  Reserves.
  7. Janet Whatley, ed., Jean de Léry: History of a Voyage to the Land of Brazil (California: 1992). *Electronic (UTNetCat)/Reserves.
  8. Arthur Coke Burnell, ed., The Voyage of John Huyghen van Linschoten to the East Indies, Vol. I (Google Books—access through UTNetCat [free to UT students]).   Reserves.
  9. Jack Beeching, ed., Hakluyt: Voyages and Discoveries. The Principal Voyages, Navigations, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation(Penguin, 1972).*  Reserves.
  10. Robert Langbaum, ed., William Shakespeare: The Tempest(Signet, 1964).*
  11. Rebecca Catz, ed., The Travels of Mendes Pinto(Chicago, 1989).*  Course packet/E-Reserves/Reserves.
  12. Nabil Matar, In the Lands of the Christians: Arabic Travel Writing in the Seventeenth Century (Routledge, 2003).*  Course packet/E-Reserves/Reserves.

There are a large number of textbooks for this course.  In order to keep the costs down, I have made these texts available in several forms.  Most can be purchased at the University Co-op as indicated by a star (*) after the entry.  Three of our titles are available online to UT students (#s 4, 7 and 8), while three others (#s 2, 11 and 12) will be made available as course packets and as electronic reserves.

Requirements and Grading Policies:

  • Attendance is required for this course.  You may, however, have two unexcused absences.  Any absences thereafter will adversely affect your final grade, and more than five absences will result in a failing grade for the course.  Exceptions may be made, however, for health problems, family difficulties, etc.   Absences resulting from the observance of religious holidays will also be respected.  Please come to class on time, and don’t forget to turn off your cellphones. 
  • Papers: Written assignments for this course will be the following:  a 1-2-page response paper; a 4-5-page interpretive essay, a final paper prospectus, and a 10-12 page research paper to be submitted in two drafts. 
  • Quizzes: There will be as many as 8 pop quizzes during the semester, which will consist of short-answer questions over the days’ reading. 

Grading for this course:

Grades will be assessed according to the following percentages:


First paper 10% February 8th

Second paper 15% March 1st

Prospectus 10% March 24th

Third paper, 1st draft 15% April 12th 

Third paper, 2nd draft 25% April 27th

Quizzes 15% periodic

Class participation 10% cumulative
 

Grand total

100%


The assignments for this course have been designed to create optimal breathing room in the busy schedules of graduating seniors.  Assignments are progressive, however, in that each one builds on the previous.  Hence, it is crucial to stay on track with the course readings and the written work. 

This is an advanced undergraduate course that is meant to be a capstone experience for the undergraduate English major at UT.   High-level critical thinking, research, and writing are expected of the participants in this seminar. 

Note on the University’s new grading system:  Last fall, a plus- and minus-grading system was created at the University of Texas.  This course will use the new grading system, which includes plusses and minuses both for assignments and for the final course grades. 

Special accommodations:  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 376 • Chaucer-W

35220 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 PAR 204
show description

TBD

Publications

Edition of Shakespeare's Cymbeline. The New Kittredge Shakespeare. Series Editor James H. Lake.  Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing, 2014.

How Stories Make Us Feel: Toward an Embodied Narratology

Journal Issue:  California Italian Studies, 2(1)

Author: Wojciehowski, Hannah, University of Texas, Austin

Gallese, Vittorio, University of Parma, Italy

Publication Date: 2011

Publication Info:

California Italian Studies, Italian Studies Multicampus Research Group, UC Office of the President

Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/3jg726c2

"The Mirror Neuron Mechanism and Literary Studies: An Interview with Vittorio Gallese," California Italian Studies 2, No. 1 (2010).

Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/56f8v9bv

 

Keywords:

Mirror Neurons, Mirror Neuron Mechanism, neurocriticism, Vittorio Gallese, neuroscience 

download

Group Identity in the Renaissance World.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.

 

http://www.cambridge.org/us/knowledge/isbn/item6038442/?site_locale=en_US

“Assessing Empathy: A Slumdog Questionnaire,” Image [&] Narrative 11, No. 2 (2010): 123-145.

“Triangulation in Humanist Friendship:  More, Erasmus, Giles, and the Making of Utopia, Discourses and Representations of Friendship in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700, ed. Daniel T. Lochman, Maritere Lopez, and Lorna Hutson.  Aldershot, Hants, England: Ashgate, 2011. 45-63.

O Dente do Bugio: Relics, Religion and Rivalry in 16th-Century Ceylon and Goa.”

Santa Barbara Portuguese Studies IX (2007): 234-253.

“The Queen of Onor and Her Emissaries:  Fernão Mendes Pinto’s Dialogue with India,” Emissaries in Early Modern Literature and Culture—Mediation, Tranmission, Traffic:  1550-1700, ed. Brinda S. Charry and Gitanjali Shahani.  Aldershot, Hants, England: Ashgate, 2009.  167-191.

“Literary Theory,” Encyclopedia of British Literature, ed. David Scott Kastan.  5 vols.  Vol. 3.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.  301-313.

 “Sex, Death, and Poetry in Cinquecento Venice: Veronica Franco vs. Maffio Venier.”  Italica 83, Nos. 3 and 4 (2006): 367-390. 

 “Francis Petrarch: First Modern Friend,” Texas Studies in Language and

Literature 47, No. 4 (Winter 2005): 269-298.

“St. Augustine.”  The Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Criticism and Theory.  Eds. Michael Groden and Martin Kreiswirth.  2nd ed.  Baltimore:  The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994, 2005.  57-58. 

Birth Passages: Maternity and Nostalgia, Antiquity to Shakespeare.  By Theresa M. Krier.  Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.  Xvii+266 pp.  Modern Philology 102, No. 3 (Feb. 2005):  410-413.

“Religion, Rivalry, and Relics in 16th-Century Goa: The Destruction and Return of the Dalada.”  Manushi.  New Delhi, India. June, 2004.

Wojciehowski.H.C. (2001) Print, Manuscript, Performance: The Changing Relations of the Media in Early Modern England. Libraries and Culture Libraries and Culture

Old Masters, New Subjects: Early Modern and Poststructuralist Theories of Will (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995).

 

http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=2383

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