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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Frank F Whigham

Professor Ph.D., 1976, University of California, San Diego

Frank F Whigham

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Biography

Frank Whigham's work focuses on early modern British literature and culture. He is one of the original group of California theorists who came to be known as the New Historicists, and his essays have appeared in many journals and collections, including PMLA, ELH, NLH, and Renaissance Drama. His work is known for combining anthropological and historical approaches to subjects as varied as Webster's Duchess of Malfi and the rhetoric of early modern English letters of recommendation. He has just completeda new scholarly edition of George Puttenham's The Art of English Poesy, co-edited with Wayne Rebhorn. He is also the founding supervisor of the Digital Archive Services database of images, which supports the teaching of British and American literature. He is now serving as the founding co-director of the Texas Institute for Textual and Literary Studies.

E 316L • British Literature

35205-35250 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
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Instructor:  Whigham, F

Unique #:  35205-35250

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Literature in History --

This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to English literature. In addition to some introductory texts (A. S. Byatt's "Christ in the House of Martha and Mary" and Samuel Beckett's Catastrophe) and various short illustrative texts introduced along the way, there will be five units in this course:

Medieval: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Renaissance: Shakespeare's King Lear

18th-century: Congreve’s The Way of the World and Swift's Gulliver's Travels

19th-century Romantic and Victorian Poetry: Blake, Shelley, Keats, Browning

Modern: Penelope Lively, Moon Tiger

Requirements & Grading: (1) We'll have 3-6 lectures and a “unit exam” (UE) on each unit (5 for the semester). The 75-minute UEs will be 75% essay in format, 25% short-answer questions. The essays will consist of identifying and discussing the significance of selected quotations from the works. (2) Each week you’ll write 100 words of discussion and a question on the week’s reading, which will be used in the section meetings. (3) There will be occasional close-reading exercises using the department’s new CRIT software. (4) There will also perhaps be a two-stage Literary Analysis Diagnostic (LAD), 75 minutes, given twice: first (LAD1) at the outset of the term (scored but not graded) and again (LAD2) during the finals period (graded). You must take both stages to earn credit for LAD2. (5) Attendance is required for both lecture and discussion section.

The LAD set, UE1, the 100W assignments (averaged), and the CRITs (averaged) will each count for 10% of your total grade. UE2-5 will count 15% each. Section attendance and engagement factors may influence your final grade. All exams are required for passing the course: no skipping and averaging. There is no cumulative final exam.

Attendance. (1) Lecture attendance is required; success requires showing up. You must check in with your TA as you enter the room, and sit in the section of the room where s/he sits. If you then leave you'll be counted absent. You'll get five free absences. Above that there will be a penalty, as follows: .125 grade-points off your course grade for 6 absences; .25 off for 7; .375 for 8; .50 for 9; 1.00 for 10; failure in the course for more than 10. There will be no excused absences. (2) Attendance is required for the sections. You get three free absences; above that you'll be penalized as follows: .125 grade-points off your course grade for 4 absences, .25 off for 5, .375 off for 6, .50 off for 7, failure in the course for 8.

E 336E • British Lit: Begin-Renaissance

35755 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 206
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Instructor:  Whigham, F            Areas:  II / D

Unique #:  35755            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description: This course will offer an upper-division survey of the literature in English of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (to 1620), designed to enable an introductory acquaintance with the different language forms of earlier periods of English; to begin developing the close reading skills that help interpret literary texts; to begin to identify and explore texts' engagements with relevant historical, cultural, intellectual, and other contexts; to develop a beginning acquaintance with some of the formal features of literary texts; and to identify and explore ways in which works are influenced by and respond to one another.

Much of the medieval material will focus on narrative, with a special emphasis on chivalric romance, the dominant form of the period. We'll read the greatest English romance, the anonymous Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, otherromances by Marie de France and Chaucer, and the closing stretch of Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte Darthur, as well as a set of supporting materials that trace the myth of the eventual return of King Arthur. We'll also read from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales: the framing General Prologue, which sets out the narrative setting of the pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas a Becket, and the great stories of the Wife of Bath and the Pardoner. Throughout all of these texts we'll orient ourselves structurally by reference to motifs of quest, pilgrimage, and journey, and maintain a topical focus on the tensions between the martial and the erotic. Then we'll finish the first half of the course with the first book of Spenser's Faerie Queene which bridges the medieval and Renaissance periods, and functions as the culmination in English of the motif of the chivalric romance.

The literature of the Elizabethan and early Jacobean period, often judged the greatest in English, forms the second half of the course. After the exam (I think) we'll focus attention on Spenser's exploration of his romance's dedicatee, Queen Elizabeth I, which we'll link to readings of a special unit of the Norton text focused on writings of "Women in Power." We'll also read extensively in the genre of the sonnet, the greatest poetic form of social and erotic wooing, exemplified by Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, and Spenser, brought to its height in the sonnets of Shakespeare, and skeptically challenged by Donne. We'll also read another allied special unit of the Norton text, an array of unfamiliar texts concerned with "Renaissance Love and Desire." The course will close with a reading of King Lear, often judged Shakespeare's greatest play, which brings together most of the course's concerns in one magisterial text.

Texts: All texts will be found in volumes A (The Middle Ages) and B (The Sixteenth and the Early Seventeenth Century) of the 9th edition of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, ed. Greenblatt et al. (2012). The images we'll be using in the course are posted at the Liberal Arts ITS Digital Archives SErvices ("DASE") database, at https://dase.laits.utexas.edu. Sign in with your EID, choose English Collection, and Search.

Schedule of readings (“N” = “Norton”; “FW” = “Whigham”): Marie de France, Lanval; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Chaucer, General Prologue, Wife of Bath’s Prologue/Tale; Pardoner’s Introduction/Prologue/Tale/Epilogue; Malory, Le Morte Darthur. N selections; The “Myth of Arthur’s Return” materials: Geoffrey, Wace, Layamon; Spenser. The Faerie Queene : Letter to Ralegh and Book 1; “Women in Power.” N selections; Wyatt & Surrey. N selections; Spenser, Amoretti. N selections; Sidney. Astrophil and Stella. FW selections; “Renaissance Love and Desire” N selections + Marlowe’s “Passionate Shepherd”; Shakespeare, Selected sonnets (FW); Donne. Songs and Sonnets, Holy Sonnets (N selections) + “Good Friday”; Shakespeare, King Lear.

Requirements & Grading: We'll have frequent 10-minute quizzes, amounting together to 20% of the course grade (you can drop two). There will be two exams, weighted at 35% of the course grade each. And participation (in class, email, and office hours) will count for 10% of the overall grade.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35290 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 105
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Instructor:  Whigham, F            Areas:  I / D

Unique #:  35290            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course offers an introduction to Shakespeare's plays, locating them in their original contexts of social production and reception. Our principal focus will be the plays' engagements with dislocations of early modern assumptions about status, kinship, gender, and service relations.

Such social uncertainties lead to questions like these. Is social rank based on birth or effort? Can it be bought? Stolen? Faked? What sorts of authority go with kinship relations? What obedience is owed to parents? Who should determine marital decisions? How is the different worth of sons or daughters to be calculated? How should dowries work? Are women separate persons? Are they more than vehicles for securing lineage and inheritance? What might they be entitled to as separate entities? Are children owned by their parents? What can they call their own? Do men and women have different kinds of friendships? Needs? Obligations? Desires? What should we make of the absence of women actors on the Renaissance stage—of the so-called transvestite theater? Why were women's roles played by pre-pubescent boys? Were there "homosexuals" in the Renaissance? Were early modern notions of sexuality importantly different from ours? Was gender always the deciding factor? How could masters and servants feel about each other? How does service differ from employment? From work? What is an apprentice? Were servants happy? Did they love their masters? Mistresses? Do men make different kinds of servants from women? Why does the same word ("service") describe categories of labor and sexuality? How does servant status interact with social rank? How can a duke be a servant? Is a husband master of his wife? Can a queen be married to her country?

Texts: (tentative) These listed will probably be ordered (and these editions recommended), but you can use any you already own. I strongly advise you to use texts with rich annotations and glosses.

Love's Labours Lost (Oxford); The Taming of the Shrew (Bedford); The Merchant of Venice (Cambridge); Much Ado about Nothing (Oxford); All's Well that Ends Well (Oxford); Measure for Measure (Oxford); Cymbeline (Oxford); The Winter's Tale (Cambridge)

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) 1. A substantial number of quizzes (20%); 1 quiz grade can be dropped; 2. Midterm essay exam (35%); 3. End-of-term essay exam (35%); 4. Class participation (10%).

E 392M • New Historicism Across Discipl

35860 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 2.124
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New Historicism Across Disciplines

This course will offer a practicum in the critical mode of New Historicism (NH), with a focus on Renaissance literature and culture. We will interfold several kinds of readings: secondary writings, both theoretical and applied, by NH critics (along with some foundational theoretical and historical materials); a selection of early modern English primary texts that played a substantial role in the rise of the mode; and some other primary writings, literary and historical.

The main focus of the course will be early modern English literature and culture. This is where the mode arose; we will survey its originary contexts (literary, historical, theoretical and presentist/critical), and everyone will conduct an eventual 20-page piece of analysis in the mode. I'm quite prepared, so far as the final paper goes, to make special arrangements for students whose work addresses other periods. For instance, other professors might be recruited to work with me grading essays on subjects outside those of early modern England. Indeed, writing for this kind of mixed audience is direct preparation for most fellowship applications and job searches, where one can seldom expect to find specialists in one's own area to review new work.

All such arrangements need to be made by the three of us early in the semester. Meanwhile, everyone will have to do the early modern English work in order to reach the point of writing the final paper: doing all of the readings and contributing to the seminar an email "page" of responses once or twice weekly (for each set of readings). As a rule we'll read primary and secondary materials concurrently, all term long.

Requirements: A weekly email "page" of responses to each set of readings; one week of seminar leading; one 20-page research paper conducted in NH mode.

A list of possible readings:

(1) Foundational texts. Althusser (ideological state apparatuses) and Geertz (readings from The Interpretation of Cultures — thick description, cockfights, religion).

(2) Historical materials. Work by Lawrence Stone, Keith Wrightson, John Neale, Wallace MacCaffrey, Susan Amussen, Joan Thirsk, Vivien Brodsky (V. B. Elliott), and others.

(3) Primary materials (to be excerpted in most cases). • Thomas Wyatt. Selected poems. • The Lisle Letters (selections) • Philip Sidney. The Lady of May; Astrophil and Stella; The Defence of Poesy • John Stubbes. A Gaping Gulf • Edmund Spenser. The Shepheardes Calender; A View of the State of Ireland • Puttenham. The Art of English Poesy • Shakespeare. Henry IV, Part One; Henry V; King Lear • Webster. The Duchess of Malfi • Middleton. Women Beware Women

(4) Secondary authors. Greenblatt, Montrose, Berger, Dollimore/Sinfield, Goldberg, Helgerson, Howard, Leinwand, Marcus, Marotti, Paster, Siemon, Stallybrass, Strier, Whigham, and others.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35200-35220 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am GSB 2.126
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Instructor:  Whigham, F            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35200-35225            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History --

This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to English literature. In addition to some introductory texts (A. S. Byatt's "Christ in the House of Martha and Mary" and Samuel Beckett's Catastrophe) and various short illustrative texts introduced along the way, there will be four units in this course:

Renaissance: Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Othello, and various poems

18th-century: Swift's Gulliver's Travels

19th-century Romantic and Victorian Poetry: Blake, Shelley, Keats, Browning

Modern: Penelope Lively, Moon Tiger

Requirements & Grading: We'll have four to six lectures and a test on each unit, along with possible frequent in-class clicker quizzes to assess knowledge of the primary materials. (Attendance is required for lecture.) The 75-minute exams will be 75% essay in format, 25% short-answer questions. The essays will consist of identifying and discussing the significance of selected quotations from the works. Together the exams will constitute 100% of your grade (save for section attendance, engagement factors, and quizzes). I plan to have the last exam on the last class day, but it might be necessary, depending on our progress, to have it on the day the final is scheduled. If you make plans to travel after classes end, assuming you'll be free on our finals day, you may have to change your travel plans if you don't want to miss the exam. All exams are required for passing the course: no skipping and averaging. There is no cumulative final exam.

Discussion sections. You'll attend a discussion section once a week. Attendance is required for the sections. You get three free absences. Four section absences and your final course grade penalty will be 0.25 grade point; five = .50 off; six = .75 off; seven = 1.0 off; eight absences and you fail the course.

E 336E • British Lit: Begin-Renaissance

35380 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Whigham, F            Areas:  II / D

Unique #:  35380            Flags:  GC

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description: This course will offer an upper-division survey of the literature in English of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (to 1620), designed to enable an introductory acquaintance with the different language forms of earlier periods of English; to begin developing the close reading skills that help interpret literary texts; to begin to identify and explore texts' engagements with relevant historical, cultural, intellectual, and other contexts; to develop a beginning acquaintance with some of the formal features of literary texts; and to identify and explore ways in which works are influenced by and respond to one another.

Much of the medieval material will focus on narrative, with a special emphasis on chivalric romance, the dominant form of the period. We'll read the greatest English romance, the anonymous Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, other romances by Marie de France and Chaucer, and the closing stretch of Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte Darthur, as well as a set of supporting materials that trace the myth of the eventual return of King Arthur. We'll also read from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales: the framing General Prologue, which sets out the narrative setting of the pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas a Becket, and the great stories of the Wife of Bath and the Pardoner. Throughout all of these texts we'll orient ourselves structurally by reference to motifs of quest, pilgrimage, and journey, and maintain a topical focus on the tensions between the martial and the erotic.

The literature of the Elizabethan and early Jacobean period, often judged the greatest in English, forms the second half of the course. The first book of Spenser's Faerie Queene bridges the medieval and Renaissance periods, and functions as the culmination in English of the motif of the chivalric romance. We'll focus special attention on Spenser's exploration of its dedicatee, Queen Elizabeth I, which we'll link to readings of a special unit of the Norton text focused on writings of "Women in Power." We'll also read extensively in the genre of the sonnet, the greatest poetic form of social and erotic wooing, exemplified by Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, and Spenser, brought to its height in the sonnets of Shakespeare, and skeptically challenged by Donne. We'll also read another allied special unit of the Norton text, an array of unfamiliar texts concerned with "Renaissance Love and Desire." The course will close with a reading of King Lear, often judged Shakespeare's greatest play, which brings together most of the course's concerns in one magisterial text.

Texts: All texts will be found in volumes A (The Middle Ages) and B (The Sixteenth and the Early Seventeenth Century) of the 9th edition of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, ed. Greenblatt et al. (2012). The images we'll be using in the course are posted at the Liberal Arts ITS Digital Archives SErvices ("DASE") database, at https://dase.laits.utexas.edu. Sign in with your EID, choose English Collection, and Search.

Schedule of readings (“N” = “Norton”; “FW” = “Whigham”): Marie de France, Lanval; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Chaucer, General Prologue, Wife of Bath’s Prologue/Tale; Pardoner’s Introduction/Prologue/Tale/Epilogue; Malory, Le Morte Darthur. N selections; The “Myth of Arthur’s Return” materials: Geoffrey, Wace, Layamon; Spenser. The Faerie Queene : Letter to Ralegh and Book 1; “Women in Power.” N selections; Wyatt & Surrey. N selections; Spenser, Amoretti. N selections; Sidney. Astrophil and Stella. FW selections; “Renaissance Love and Desire” N selections + Marlowe’s “Passionate Shepherd”; Shakespeare, Selected sonnets (FW); Donne. Songs and Sonnets, Holy Sonnets (N selections) + “Good Friday”; Shakespeare, King Lear.

Requirements & Grading: We'll have frequent 10-minute quizzes, amounting together to 20% of the course grade (you can drop two). There will be two exams, weighted at 35% of the course grade each. And participation (in class, email, and office hours) will count for 10% of the overall grade.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35160 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Whigham, F            Areas:  I / D

Unique #:  35160            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course offers an introduction to Shakespeare's plays, locating them in their original contexts of social production and reception. Our principal focus will be the plays' engagements with dislocations of early modern assumptions about status, kinship, gender, and service relations. 

Such social uncertainties lead to questions like these. Is social rank based on birth or effort? Can it be bought? Stolen? Faked? What sorts of authority go with kinship relations? What obedience is owed to parents? Who should determine marital decisions? How is the different worth of sons or daughters to be calculated? How should dowries work? Are women separate persons? Are they more than vehicles for securing lineage and inheritance? What might they be entitled to as separate entities? Are children owned by their parents? What can they call their own? Do men and women have different kinds of friendships? Needs? Obligations? Desires? What should we make of the absence of women actors on the Renaissance stage—of the so-called transvestite theater? Why were women's roles played by pre-pubescent boys? Were there "homosexuals" in the Renaissance? Were early modern notions of sexuality importantly different from ours? Was gender always the deciding factor? How could masters and servants feel about each other? How does service differ from employment? From work? What is an apprentice? Were servants happy? Did they love their masters? Mistresses? Do men make different kinds of servants from women? Why does the same word ("service") describe categories of labor and sexuality? How does servant status interact with social rank? How can a duke be a servant? Is a husband master of his wife? Can a queen be married to her country?

Texts: (tentative) These listed will probably be ordered (and these editions recommended), but you can use any you already own (except for the Lear). I strongly advise you to use texts with rich annotations and glosses. (The King Lear edition is crucial to buy; wait for in-class explanation on this before you decide to use another text.)

Hamlet (Oxford); Henry IV, Part One (Oxford); Henry IV, Part Two (Cambridge); Henry V (Cambridge); King Lear (Cambridge); Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy (Norton); Love's Labours Lost (Oxford); Othello (Cambridge); Richard II (Cambridge); The Merchant of Venice (Bedford); The Tempest (Bedford); Twelfth Night (Oxford).

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) 1. A substantial number of quizzes (30%); 1 quiz grade can be dropped; 2. Midterm essay exam (30%); 3. End-of-term essay exam (30%); 4. Class participation (10%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

34940-34955 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am FAC 21
show description

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History --

This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to English literature. In addition to some introductory texts (A. S. Byatt's "Christ in the House of Martha and Mary" and Samuel Beckett's Catastrophe) and various short illustrative texts introduced along the way, there will be four units in this course:

Renaissance: Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Othello, and various poems

18th-century: Swift's Gulliver's Travels

19th-century Romantic and Victorian Poetry: Blake, Shelley, Keats, Browning

Modern: Penelope Lively, Moon Tiger

Requirements & Grading: We'll have four to six lectures and a test on each unit. (Attendance is not required for lecture.) The 75-minute exams will be 75% essay in format, 25% objective questions. The essays will consist of identifying and discussing the significance of selected quotations from the works. Together the exams will constitute 100% of your grade (save for section attendance and engagement factors and possible quizzes). I hope to be able to have the last exam on the last class day, but it might be necessary, depending on our progress, to have it on the day the final is scheduled. If you make plans to travel after classes end, assuming you'll be free on our finals day, you may have to change your travel plans if you don't want to miss the exam. All exams are required for passing the course: no skipping and averaging. There is no cumulative final exam.

Discussion sections. You'll attend a discussion section once a week. Attendance is required for the sections. You get three free absences. Four section absences and your final course grade penalty will be 0.25 grade point; five = .50 off; six = .75 off; seven = 1.0 off; eight absences and you fail the course.

E 392M • Renaissance Drama

35685 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 221
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Renaissance Tragedy

This course will offer a survey of Renaissance Tragedy, with an eye to the integration of questions from the overlapping spheres of status, gender, kinship, and service relations, each of which underwent substantial dislocations during the period. We'll seek to test the idea that most or all of these variables are in play at all times; that questions about service relations cannot sensibly be answered without attention to status, gender, and kinship matters, etc.

Such social uncertainties lead to questions like these. Is social rank based on birth or effort? Can it be bought? Stolen? Faked? What sorts of authority go with kinship relations? What obedience is owed to parents? Who should determine marital decisions? How is the different worth of sons and daughters to be calculated? How should dowries work? Are women separate persons (how does "coverture" work)? Are they more than vehicles for securing lineage and inheritance? What might they be entitled to as separate entities? Are unmarried children owned by their parents? What can they call their own? Do men and women have different kinds of friendships? Needs? Obligations? Desires? Were early modern notions of sexuality significantly different from ours? Was gender always the deciding factor? How could masters and servants feel about each other? How does service differ from employment? From work? What is an apprentice? Were servants happy? Did they love their masters? Mistresses? Do men make different kinds of servants from women? Why does the same word ("service") describe categories of labor and sexuality? How does servant status interact with social rank? How can a duke be a servant? Is a husband master of his wife? Can a queen be married to her country?

Tentative primary readings

Anon., Arden of Faversham

Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy

Marlowe, Doctor Faustus, The Jew of Malta

Shakespeare, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear

Heywood, A Woman Killed with Kindness

Cary, Mariam

Wilkins, The Miseries of Enforced Marriage

Webster, The White Devil, The Duchess of Malfi

Middleton, The Revenger's Tragedy, A Yorkshire Tragedy, The Changeling, Women Beware Women

Tentative secondary readings

Coser, The Family: Its Structures and Functions

Bourdieu, Outline of a Theory of Practice

Fletcher, Gender, Sex, and Subordination in England, 1500-1800

Houlbrooke, The English Family 1450-1700

Stone, The Crisis of the Aristocracy

Wrightson, English Society, 1580-1680

 

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35190-35230 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 1.308
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Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Course Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed?  Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor? If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

This variant of E316k is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden); Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 350E • Elite Marriage In Renaissance

35605 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 103
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Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will afford the student a detailed encounter with the structured practices of elite marriage in the Renaissance and the texts that manifest their effects to modern readers.

Texts:  Readings for the course will be developed from the following.

 • HISTORICAL SCHOLARSHIP:

Lawrence Stone, The Crisis of the Aristocracy (selections); Ralph Houlbrooke, The English Family, 1450-1700.

  • EARLY MODERN NON-DRAMATIC AND "NON-LITERARY" TEXTS:

Howell, State Trials: Anne Boleyn, Katherine Howard, and Frances Howard trials; Furnivall, Child-marriages, divorces, and ratifications, &c. in the diocese of Chester, A.D. 1561-6.

 • EARLY MODERN DRAMATIC TEXTS:

Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy; Anon., Arden of Faversham; Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Othello; Heywood, A Woman Killed with Kindness; Wilkins, The Miseries of Enforced Marriage; Webster, The White Devil; Middleton, Women Beware Women.

Requirements & Grading: Assignments (scale and weight noted) will include the following: One early paper with draft (3 pages; 10% and 15% = 25%); One research paper with draft (7 and 10 pages; 20% and 30% = 50%); One précis of research paper (1 page; 5%); Two graded peer reviews, one for each paper (1-2 pages/5% each = 10%); Seminar participation (10%).

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

34470 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 105
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Course Description: This course offers an introduction to Shakespeare's plays, locating them in their original contexts of social production and reception. Our principal focus will be the plays' engagements with dislocations of early modern assumptions about status, kinship, gender, and service relations. Such social uncertainties lead to questions like these. Is social rank based on birth or effort? Can it be bought? Stolen? Faked? What sorts of authority go with kinship relations? What obedience is owed to parents? Who should determine marital decisions? How is the different worth of sons or daughters to be calculated? How should dowries work? Are women separate persons? Are they more than vehicles for securing lineage and inheritance? What might they be entitled to as separate entities? Are children owned by their parents? What can they call their own? Do men and women have different kinds of friendships? Needs? Obligations? Desires? What should we make of the absence of women actors on the Renaissance stage—of the so-called transvestite theater? Why were women's roles played by pre-pubescent boys? Were there "homosexuals" in the Renaissance? Were early modern notions of sexuality importantly different from ours? Was gender always the deciding factor? How could masters and servants feel about each other? How does service differ from employment? From work? What is an apprentice? Were servants happy? Did they love their masters? Mistresses? Do men make different kinds of servants from women? Why does the same word ("service") describe categories of labor and sexuality? How does servant status interact with social rank? How can a duke be a servant? Is a husband master of his wife? Can a queen be married to her country?

Texts: (tentative) These listed will probably be ordered (and these editions recommended), but you can use any you already own (except for the Lear). I strongly advise you to use texts with rich annotations and glosses. (The King Lear edition is crucial to buy; wait for in-class explanation on this before you decide to use another text.) Hamlet (Oxford); Henry IV, Part One (Oxford); Henry IV, Part Two (Cambridge); Henry V (Cambridge); King Lear (Cambridge); Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy (Norton); Love's Labours Lost (Oxford); Othello (Cambridge); Richard II (Cambridge); The Merchant of Venice (Bedford); The Tempest (Bedford); Twelfth Night (Oxford).

Grading: (tentative) 1. A substantial number of quizzes (30%); 1 quiz grade can be dropped; 2. Midterm essay exam (30%); 3. End-of-term essay exam (30%); 4. Class participation (10%).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: English

34450-34495 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 JGB 2.324
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Unique #s: 34450, 34455, 34460, 34465, 34470, 34475, 34480, 34485, 34490, 34495

E316K: Masterworks of British Literature                                                                    Frank Whigham
Spring 2010: TT 8-9.30 (JGB 2.324)                                                                          Parlin 316, 471-8794
Unique (section) numbers: 34450-34495                                                                   ffw@mail.utexas.edu

STAFF/COMMUNICATION

Welcome to English 316K. Here's the preliminary contact data for the staff:

NAME SECTIONS OFFICE HOURS EMAIL
FRANK WHIGHAM   PAR 316 TT 930-11 ffw@mail.utexas.edu
Todd Balazic 34475, 34480 FAC 16 TT 10-11, W 4-5 tbalazic@mail.utexas.edu
Jordan Lamfers 34470, 34485 FAC 16 M 12-2, W 12-1 jordanslamfers@mail.utexas.edu
Patrick Schultz 34460, 34495 FAC 16 M 2-4, Tu 2-3 patrickschultz@mail.utexas.edu
Jayita Sinha 34450, 34455 FAC 16 TT 930-11 jsinha@mail.utexas.edu
Kathleen Zvarych 34465, 34490 FAC 16 Tu 930-11 and 330-5 kzvar@hotmail.com

The Blackboard site is where all official announcements for the course will appear, whether or not I pass out paper handouts in class. Get in the habit of checking for new posts. You'll also occasionally receive email announcements from me; watch for them. Familiarize yourself with the UT Electronic Mail Student Notification Policy at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html. Note especially: "Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical." Feel free to email me with questions, except for those that are already answered in this policy statement, which will be posted on the BB site.

Prerequisites:

Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test. No Exceptions.

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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