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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Don B Graham

Professor Ph.D., 1971, University of Texas at Austin

Don B Graham

Contact

Biography

Don Graham’s research interests include Southwestern American Literature/ Film, Nineteenth & Twentieth Century American Literature/Culture, and Australian Literature.  Major publications includeNo Name on the Bullet:  A Biography of Audie Murphy (1989), Cowboys and Cadillacs:  How Hollywood Looks at Texas (1983); and Kings of Texas:  The 150-Year Saga of an American Ranching Empire (2003), which won the T.I.L. Carr P. Collins Prize for Best Nonfiction Book. In 2005 Graham received the Best General Criticism Award from the City/Regional Magazine Association, for his literary columns in Texas Monthly.  In 2006 he received the Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching at UT.

Interests

Southwestern American literature; Australian literature and film; American literature.

E 342 • Life And Lit Of Texas

35755 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 301
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D

Unique #:  35755

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from across the state. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, and others. We will also see the film Giant.

Texts: Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses; Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place; Philipp Meyer, The Son; + Lone Star Literature: A Texas Anthology.

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 50%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 379R • Jfk Assntn: Fact/Fict/Fant

36020 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D

Unique #:  36020

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Independent Inquiry; Writing

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Although the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963 is one of the most thoroughly documented events in American history, the whole episode remains unsettled, the source of ongoing debate, unease, and a myriad of conspiracy theories. In this course I propose to study that day in Dallas from three perspectives. First we will try to establish a factual basis from a reading of James Swanson’s End of Days. The second part of the course will focus on fiction inspired by the assassination: Don Delillo’s Libra, Adam Braver’s November 22, 1963, and probably one other title. Finally, we will take a look into the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, which constitutes the “Fantasy” part of the course title.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a writing assignment worth 30% and a longer, closing paper worth 60%. Class attendance & participation, including pop quizzes, 10 %.

E F379R • Kennedy: Fact/Fict/Fantasy

83255 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm BEN 1.106
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D

Unique #:  83255

Semester:  Summer 2014, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Independent Inquiry; Writing

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Although the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963 is one of the most thoroughly documented events in American history, the whole episode remains unsettled, the source of ongoing debate, unease, and a myriad of conspiracy theories. In this course I propose to study that day in Dallas from three perspectives. First we will try to establish a factual basis from a reading of James Swanson’s End of Days. The second part of the course will focus on fiction inspired by the assassination:  Don Delillo’s Libra, Adam Braver’s November 22, 1963, and probably one other title. Finally, we will take a look into the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, which constitutes the “Fantasy” part of the course title.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a writing assignment worth 30% and a longer, closing paper worth 60%. Class attendance & participation, including pop quizzes, 10 %.

E S342 • Life And Literature Of Texas

83395 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 301
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D

Unique #:  83395

Semester:  Summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from across the state. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, and others. We will also see the film Giant.

Texts: Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses; Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place; Philipp Meyer, The Son; + Lone Star Literature: A Texas Anthology.

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 50%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 342 • Life And Literature Of Texas

35980 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D

Unique #:  35980

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines modern Texas as revealed through fiction. Topics include cattle, oil, love, death, and the Kennedy assassination.

Texts: Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men; Bryan Woolley, November 22; Philipp Meyer, The Son; course packet, E 342: Life and Literature of Texas.

Requirements & Grading: First exam, 30%; Second Exam 40%; Essay, 20%; In-class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 379R • Kennedy: Fact/Fict/Fantasy

36215 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D

Unique #:  36215

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Although the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963—fifty years ago—is one of the most thoroughly documented events in American history, the whole episode remains unsettled, the source of ongoing debate, unease, and a myriad of conspiracy theories. In this course I propose to study that day in Dallas from three perspectives. First we will try to establish a factual basis from lectures and from student reports based on independent readings regarding different aspects of the event. The main part of the course will focus on fiction inspired by the assassination: Adam Braver’s November 22, 1963; Bryan Woolley’s November 22; and Don Delillo’s Libra. We will also read Norman James Swanson’s End of Days: The assassination of John F. Kennedy. Finally, we will take a look into the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, which constitutes the “Fantasy” part of the course title.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a writing assignment worth 30% and a longer, closing paper worth 60%. Class attendance & participation: 10 %.

E 342 • Life And Literature Of Texas

35775 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 301
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35775            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from four traditions: Southern (East Texas), Western, Mexican-American, and Urban. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Américo Paredes, Cormac McCarthy, and others.  

Texts: Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses; Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place; Edwin Shrake, Strange Peaches; Américo Paredes, George Washington Gómez; Philipp Meyer, The Son.

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 40%; Essay—10%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 379R • Kennedy: Fact/Fict/Fantasy

36020 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  36020            Flags:  Independent inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Although the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963 is one of the most thoroughly documented events in American history, the whole episode remains unsettled, the source of ongoing debate, unease, and a myriad of conspiracy theories. In this course I propose to study that day in Dallas from three perspectives. First we will try to establish a factual basis from a reading of Vincent Bugliosi’s Four Days in November followed by student reports based on independent readings regarding different phases of Lee Harvey Oswald’s life. The second part of the course will focus on fiction inspired by the assassination:, Don Delillo’s Libra, Adam Braver’s November 22, 1963, and probably one other title. We will also read Norman Mailer’s Oswald’s Tale.  Finally, we will take a look into the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, which constitutes the “Fantasy” part of the course title.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a writing assignment worth 30% and a longer, closing paper worth 60%. Class attendance & participation: 10 %.

E F379R • Kennedy: Fact/Fict/Fantasy

83610 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm BEN 1.106
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  83610            Flags:  Independent inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Although the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963 is one of the most thoroughly documented events in American history, the whole episode remains unsettled, the source of ongoing debate, unease, and a myriad of conspiracy theories. In this course I propose to study that day in Dallas from three perspectives. First we will try to establish a factual basis from a reading of Vincent Bugliosi’s Four Days in November followed by student reports based on independent readings regarding different phases of Lee Harvey Oswald’s life. The second part of the course will focus on fiction inspired by the assassination:, Don Delillo’s Libra, Adam Braver’s November 22, 1963, and probably one other title. We will also read Norman Mailer’s Oswald’s Tale.  Finally, we will take a look into the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, which constitutes the “Fantasy” part of the course title.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a writing assignment worth 30% and a longer, closing paper worth 60%. Class attendance & participation: 10 %.

E S342 • Life And Literature Of Texas

83745 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm BEN 1.122
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  83745            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from across the state. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, and others. We will also see two or three key Texas films.

Texts: Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By and The Last Picture Show; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses and No Country for Old Men; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963; Americo Paredes, George Washington Gomez

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 50%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 342 • Life And Literature Of Texas

35445 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35445            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from four traditions: Southern (East Texas), Western, Mexican-American, and Urban. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Américo Paredes, Cormac McCarthy, and others.  

Texts: Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses;  Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place; Edwin Shrake, Strange Peaches; Américo Paredes, George Washington Gómez; Don Graham, ed., Lone Star Literature.

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 40%; Essay—10%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 379R • Kennedy: Fact/Fict/Fantasy

35720 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35720            Flags:  Independent inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Although the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963 is one of the most thoroughly documented events in American history, the whole episode remains unsettled, the source of ongoing debate, unease, and a myriad of conspiracy theories. In this course I propose to study that day in Dallas from three perspectives. First we will try to establish a factual basis from a reading of Vincent Bugliosi’s Four Days in November followed by student reports based on independent readings regarding different phases of Lee Harvey Oswald’s life. The second part of the course will focus on fiction inspired by the assassination: Edwin Shrake’s Strange Peaches, Don Delillo’s Libra, and Adam Braver’s November 22, 1963. We will also read Norman Mailer’s Oswald’s Tale.  Finally, we will take a look into the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, which constitutes the “Fantasy” part of the course title.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a writing assignment worth 30% and a longer, closing paper worth 60%. Class attendance & participation: 10 %.

E 379R • Kennedy: Fact/Fict/Fantasy

35740 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35740            Flags:  Independent Inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Although the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963 is one of the most thoroughly documented events in American history, the whole episode remains unsettled, the source of ongoing debate, unease, and a myriad of conspiracy theories. In this course I propose to study that day in Dallas from three perspectives. First we will try to establish a factual basis from a reading of Vincent Bugliosi’s Four Days in November followed by student reports based on independent readings regarding different phases of Lee Harvey Oswald’s life. The second part of the course will focus on fiction inspired by the assassination: Edwin Shrake’s Strange Peaches, Don Delillo’s Libra, and Adam Braver’s November 22, 1963. We will also read Norman Mailer’s Oswald’s Tale.  Finally, we will take a look into the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, which constitutes the “Fantasy” part of the course title.

This course will also have an HRC component. The Don DeLillo Collection and the Norman Mailer Collection will be used in our study of the works by those authors. Edwin Shrake’s papers may also be consulted at Texas State University-San Marcos.

I envision the course as a multi-layered investigation into how language and research are employed to create structures of factual as well as emotional truths or fictions.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a writing assignment worth 30% and a longer, closing paper worth 60%. Class attendance & participation: 10 %.

E 380F • Literature For Writers

35760 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 204
show description

English 380:  Lone Star Literature

Beyond the borders of the second largest state in the Union, Texas writing is often mischaracterized in the same way that much else about the Lone Star State is.  Here, for example, is a description of Southwestern & Texas writers that appeared in a mass-market paperback anthology from the 1980s:  “Some were born among the sagebrush and the mesquite trees.  Others traveled here from the soot choked cities of the East.  But all write with their feet dusty from the mesas or with fingers greasy from chicken-fried steak.” A comment from a 1998 article in The Economist tells us that “Even educated Texans have often preferred insubstantial humour books and western pulp fiction to ‘highfalutin’ writing.”  This course will set everything right by taking a close look at a significant literary tradition. We will read Katherine Anne Porter, J. Frank Dobie, Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, Américo Paredes, and a host of other writers who have made Texas their literary field of dreams.  Requirements will include one essay—a site visit to a nearby literary place associated with a particular author—and a longer essay.

Required  texts:  Don Graham, ed., Lone Star Literature: A Texas Anthology; Katherine Anne Porter, Pale Horse, Pale Rider; John Graves, Goodbye to a River; Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian; or the Evening Redness in the West; Cormac McCarthy. No Country for Old Men; Américo Paredes, George Washington Gómez; Edwin Shrake, Strange Peaches; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963; Don Graham, State of Minds:  Texas Culture & Its Discontents.

 

E F342 • Life And Lit Of The Southwest

83655 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 303
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  83655            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from across the state. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, and others. We will also see two or three key Texas films.

Texts: Don Graham, ed., Lone Star Literature; Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses, and No Country for Old Men; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963.

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 50%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E S379R • The Great War And Mod Brit Lit

83925 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Graham, D            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  83925            Flags:  Writing; Independent Inquiry

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 379R (Topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature) and 379S (embedded topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The Great War as it is called in the UK—1914-1918—is a remote historical cataclysm largely unknown to many 21st century Americans. This course will seek to bring back to life the historical facts and trauma of that era that shaped the 20th century probably more profoundly than any other single set of events and circumstances. To do so, we will look at poetry of the period, especially the poems of Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, but our main focus will be on three novels written during the last twenty years, each of which is an attempt to recover the lost world of the Great War. To that end we will read Pat Barker’s Regeneration, Sebastian Faulks’ Birdsong, and Sebastian Barry’s A Long Long Way. We will also see a film or two, and part of our focus will also be to try to understand what happened on the Somme in 1916. We are just two years away from the Centennial of World War I, and this course will put you way ahead of the rest of the population in knowledge and understanding.

Requirements & Grading: Students will write two papers totaling sixteen pages of critical & historical analysis based primarily on the history of the Great War as revealed in Barker, Faulks, and Barry.

E 342 • Life And Lit Of The Southwest

35275 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 301
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from four traditions: Southern (East Texas), Western, Mexican-American, and Urban. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Américo Paredes, Cormac McCarthy, and others. We will also see three key Texas films. 

Texts: Don Graham, ed., Lone Star Literature; Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963.

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 40%; Essay—10%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 379R • The Great War And Mod Brit Lit

35555 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 204
show description

E 379R (Topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature) and 379S (embedded topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature) may not both be counted.

 Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The Great War as it is called in the UK—1914-1918—is a remote historical cataclysm largely unknown to many 21st century Americans. This course will seek to bring back to life the historical facts and trauma of that era that shaped the 20th century probably more profoundly than any other single set of events and circumstances. To do so, we will look at poetry of the period, especially the poems of Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, but our main focus will be on three novels written during the last twenty years, each of which is an attempt to recover the lost world of the Great War. To that end we will read Pat Barker’s Regeneration, Sebastian Faulks’ Birdsong, and Sebastian Barry’s A Long Long Way. We will also see a film or two, and part of our focus will also be to try to understand what happened on the Somme in 1916. We are just three years away from the Centennial of World War I, and this course will put you way ahead of the rest of the population in knowledge and understanding.

Requirements & Grading: Students will write two papers totaling sixteen pages of critical & historical analysis based primarily on the history of the Great War as revealed in Barker, Faulks, and Barry.

E F379R • The Great War And Mod Brit Lit

83670 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 204
show description

E 379R (Topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature) and 379S (embedded topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature) may not both be counted.

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: The Great War as it is called in the UK—1914-1918—is a remote historical cataclysm largely unknown to many 21st century Americans. This course will seek to bring back to life the historical facts and trauma of that era that shaped the 20th century probably more profoundly than any other single set of events and circumstances. To do so, we will look at poetry of the period, especially the poems of Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, but our main focus will be on three novels written during the last twenty years, each of which is an attempt to recover the lost world of the Great War. To that end we will read Pat Barker’s Regeneration, Sebastian Faulks’ Birdsong, and Sebastian Barry’s A Long Long Way. We will also see a film or two, and part of our focus will also be to try to understand what happened on the Somme in 1916. We are just three years away from the Centennial of World War I, and this course will put you way ahead of the rest of the population in knowledge and understanding.

 

Requirements & Grading: Students will write two papers totaling sixteen pages of critical & historical analysis based primarily on the history of the Great War as revealed in Barker, Faulks, and Barry.

E S342 • Life And Lit Of The Southwest

83790 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 301
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from four traditions: Southern (East Texas), Western, Mexican-American, and Urban. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Américo Paredes, Cormac McCarthy, and others. We will also see three key Texas films.

 

Texts: Don Graham, ed., Lone Star Literature; Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963.

 

Requirements & Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 40%; Essay—10%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

E 342 • Life And Lit Of The Southwest

35525 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 500pm-800pm PAR 201
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: This is a course in regional literature, specifically writing set in Texas and written mostly but not exclusively by Texans. I divide the state into its own regions: the South (East Texas), the West (the arid lands), the Border (El Paso to Brownsville), and Town and City (where most people in Texas live). We will read stories, essays, parts of autobiographies and memoirs, and cuttings from novels by both major figures and relative unknowns. We will also read full-length works by Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, Billy Lee Brammer, and Adam Braver. What will emerge, I believe, is a full, rich portrait of Texas through literature and film. The course should be equally valuable to those not born and raised in Texas as well as those who have never lived anywhere else. We will also see three films: Hud , Giant, and The Three Burials of Melquiadas Estrada.

Texts: Don Graham (ed.), Lone Star Literature: A Texas Anthology; Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses; Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963; Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men.

Note: All films or film footage will be subject to examinations the same as written texts. All handouts are considered texts as well and therefore subject to exam questions.

Grading: Two exams (50% and 29%) one essay (11 %) class participation including attendance (10%). Grades will be based on an A-F system, no pluses & minuses.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

E 342 • Life And Lit Of The Southwest

34630 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 201
show description

Course Description: This is a course in regional literature, specifically writing set in Texas and written mostly but not exclusively by Texans. I divide the state into its own regions: the South (East Texas), the West (the arid lands), the Border (El Paso to Brownsville), and Town and City (where most people in Texas live). We will read stories, essays, parts of autobiographies and memoirs, and cuttings from novels by both major figures and relative unknowns. We will also read full-length works by Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, Billy Lee Brammer, and Adam Braver. What will emerge, I believe, is a full, rich portrait of Texas through literature and film. The course should be equally valuable to those not born and raised in Texas as well as those who have never lived anywhere else. We will also see three films: Hud , Giant, and The Three Burials of Melquiadas Estrada. 

 Texts: Don Graham (ed.), Lone Star Literature: A Texas Anthology; Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses; Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963; Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men. Note: All films or film footage will be subject to examinations the same as written texts. All handouts are considered texts as well and therefore subject to exam questions.

 Grading: Two exams (50% and 29%) one essay (11 %) class participation including attendance (10%). Grades will be based on an A-F system, no pluses & minuses. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 


 

 

E 379R • The Great War And Mod Brit Lit

34970 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 204
show description

Only one of the following may be counted: E 379M (Topic: British Literature of the Great War-England), 379R (Topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature), 379S (embedded topic: The Great War and Modern British Literature).

Course Description: In England the Great War—1914-1918—is far more important in British consciousness than World War II. On one day alone, July 1, 1916, England suffered 60,000 casualties in attacks along the Somme, and the psychological damage—to British confidence, to the idea of Empire—was incalculable. Certainly the impact on novelists and poets was profound as well. To this end we will study some of the major texts arising from the war and its aftermath.

Texts: We will read the most famous memoir of the war, Robert Graves’s Good-Bye To All That, as well as the poetry of Siegfrieg Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, and other war poets, several of whom perished on the Western Front. We will also read Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway as a non-combatant post-war response. Finally, in the past fifteen years there has been a belated response to the Great War by novelists such as Pat Barker and Sebastian Faulks.  We will read Barker’s Regeneration and Faulks’s Birdsong. There will also be a packet of readings relating to the War.

Grading: Requirements include three papers totaling 16 pages. The first will be a critical essay of 6 pages, the second an historical essay of 4 pages, the third a combination of criticism and history of 6 pages, equaling a total of 16 pages. This writing constitutes 90% of the grade; the other 10% is based on class participation.

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 342 • Life And Lit Of The Southwest

83065 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 301
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Course Description: This course examines how Texas authors describe and explore the diversity and complexity of a state too often seen in terms of myth and caricature. To do so, we will read literature from four traditions: Southern (East Texas), Western, Mexican-American, and Urban. Writers to be studied include Katherine Anne Porter, Larry McMurtry, Américo Paredes, Cormac McCarthy, and others. We will also see three key Texas films.

Texts: Don Graham, ed., Lone Star Literature; Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By; Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men; Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place; Adam Braver, November 22, 1963.

Grading: Mid-term, 40%; final, 40%; Essay—10%; in class participation & attendance, 10%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.  

For more information, please download the full course syllabus.

E 379S • Senior Seminar-W

83335 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 304
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Course Description: In England the Great War—1914-1918—is far more important in British consciousness than World War II. On one day alone, July 1, 1916, England suffered 60,000 casualties in attacks along the Somme, and the psychological damage—to British confidence, to the idea of Empire—was incalculable. Certainly the impact on novelists and poets was profound as well. To this end we will study some of the major texts arising from the war and its aftermath.

Texts: We will read the poetry of Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, and other war poets, several of whom perished on the Western Front. We will also read Vera Brittain’s memoir, Testament of Youth, a compelling story of a young woman’s experiences before and during the war. Then we will turn to the recent past, when there has been a renewed late twentieth-century response to the Great War by novelists such as Pat Barker and Sebastian Faulks. To this end we will read Barker’s Regeneration and Faulks’s Birdsong.

Grading: Students will write two papers totaling sixteen pages of critical & historical analysis based primarily on the history and literature of the Somme.

Prerequisites:  Completion of at least ninety semester hours of coursework, including twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 342 • Life And Lit Of The Southwest

34820 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 201
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E 342: Life & Literature of the Southwest

Don Graham. Spring 2010. 12:30-2 TT  Parlin 201.
Office: Calhoun 306.  Office hrs: 2-3 TT.
Teaching Assistant:  Colleen Eils.  Office hrs:  TBA.

This is a course in regional literature, specifically writing set in Texas and written mostly but not exclusively by Texans.  I divide the state into its own regions:  the South (East Texas), the West (the arid lands), the Border (El Paso to Brownsville), and Town and City (where most people in Texas live).  We will read stories, essays, parts of autobiographies and memoirs, and cuttings from novels by both major figures and relative unknowns.  We will also read full-length works by Larry McMurtry,  Cormac McCarthy, Billy Lee Brammer, and Adam Braver. What will emerge, I believe, is a full, rich portrait of Texas through literature and film.  The course should be equally  valuable to those not born and raised in Texas as well as those who have never lived anywhere else.   We will also see three films:  Hud, Giant, and The Three Burials of Melquiadas Estrada

Texts:  

  • Don Graham (ed.), ­ Lone Star Literature:  A Texas Anthology
  • Larry McMurtry, Horseman, Pass By
  • Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses
  • Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place 
  • Adam Braver, November 22, 1963
  • Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men

Note:   All films or film footage will be subject to examinations the same as written texts.  All handouts are considered texts as well and therefore subject to exam questions.

Requirements: 

  • Two exams (50% and 29%)
  • one  essay (11 %)  
  • class participation including attendance (10%)

Grades will be based on an A-F system, no pluses & minuses.     

Prerequisites:  

Nine semester hours of course work in English or Rhetoric & Writing.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

 

E 344L • Australian Lit And Film-W

34855 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 204
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English 344L: Australian Literature & Film (34855)

Don  Graham  /  Spring 2010  /  3:30-5 TTH  /  Parlin 204
Office: Calhoun 306  /  Office hrs: 1-2 TT

Texts:  

   Robyn Davidson, Tracks
   Australian Literature & Film (Co-Op Packet);
   Kate Jennings, Snake (Co-Op Packet)

Films: 

  • Walkabout
  • The Tracker

Please note:  Films and hand-outs carry full weight as texts.

Requirements: 

  • Two exams (50% and 29%)
  • one essay (11%)
  • class participation and attendance (10%)

Grades will be based on the A-F scale, no pluses or minuses.

Prerequisites:  

Nine semester hours of course work in English or Rhetoric & Writing.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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