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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Barbara Harlow

Professor Ph.D., 1977, SUNY- Buffalo

Barbara Harlow

Contact

Biography

Barbara Harlow is the Louann and Larry Temple Centennial Professor of English Literatures and taught at the American University in Cairo, University College Galway, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, University of Natal in Pietermaritzburg and in Durban. She authored Resistance Literature, Barred: Women, Writing, and Political Detention, After Lives: Legacies of Revolutionary Writing, and co-edited Imperialism and Orientalism: A Documentary Sourcebook and Archives of Empire: Vol 1 and Vol 11. She is working on a bio-biography of the South African activist, Ruth First. Interests include “imperialism and orientalism” and “literature and human rights/social justice.”


Additional department affiliations: Middle Eastern Studies


Interests

Third world studies; critical theory; prison and resistance writings and postcolonial studies (particularly Anglophone African and modern Arabic literatures and cultures).

E 356 • The European Novel

35855 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 105
(also listed as EUS 347 )
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B

Unique #:  35855

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  EUS 347

Flags:  Global Cultures; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus, The Plague; Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa; Additional critical readings.

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers, one reaction paper, one paper proposal, and a final paper. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

2 research assignments (750 wds) = 30%; 1 reaction paper (750 wds) = 15%; 1 paper proposal = 15%; 1 final paper = 30%.

E 397N • Scramble For Africa

36140 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 221
show description

The "scramble for Africa," consolidated at the Berlin Conference, held in 1884-85, divided the terrain of the African continent among the numerous European contenders. The course will examine both the literary history of that "scramble" together with its historical and documentary record of "civilization, Christianity and commerce." The selection of materials will range from the travel accounts of adventurers and missionaries such as Livingstone, Stanley, and Conrad to Mark Twain's scathing critique of Belgium's King Leopold's enterprises in the Congo. Dickens, for example, had execrated the missionaries in his caricature of Mrs Jellyby in Bleak House, but it would also be missionaries who testified against King Leopold's atrocities. The work of a Richard Burton, on the other hand, like that of other explorers and intellectual tourists, can further exemplify the disciplinary consolidation of imperialism in such institutions as the Royal Geographic Society. John Ruskin's Oxford Inaugural Lecture, said to have inspired Cecil Rhodes, is still another example of the reciprocity between the world of letters and the arenas of political expansionism. The British imperial project, however, was not without its contemporary critics, and we will examine a series of crises of empire, such as the Boer War at the turn of the century and the conflictual contradictions that were complicating the imperial project; the Congo reform movement with its combination of literary representations and human rights reports of the time; and today’s debates over a new/renewed “scramble for Africa.”

The course will be organized around a set of literary artifacts and complemented by materials from the documentary record, the "imperial archive,” and with reference to contemporary events.

Readings:

1. The Scramble for Africa

Joseph Conrad. Heart of Darkness

 

2. The Anglo-Boer War

Olive Schreiner. Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland

 

3. Mines, Magnates, Minerals

John Buchan. Prester John

 

4. From the Scramble for Africa to the Scramble for Contracts

Henning Mankell. The Man from Beijing

 

Requirements:

1 class presentation (TBA – to be submitted in written form – 1200-1500 wds)

1 book review (1200-1500 wds)

final project: paper proposal (300-500 wds) in response to a CFP, that would include an extended and annotated working research bibliography (10-15+pp)

E 360S • Literature And Social Justice

36120 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 323
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B

Unique #:  36120

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: What do “humanitarianism” and “human rights” have to do with the humanities? In what ways can literature contribute to a consideration of these pressing questions in the early 21st century? In a globalizing culture, our interest will be both international and domestic, looking at ways in which personal stories contribute to political histories. In focusing on topics of “social justice,” we will consider such questions as truth commissions, refugees, torture, corporate social responsibility, drones and target killing.

Texts: Henning Mankell – Chronicler of the Winds (social justice and storytelling); Sindiwe Magona – Mother to Mother (truth commissions); Ghassan Kanafani – Men in the Sun and Returning to Haifa (refugees); Ruth First – 117 Days (torture); Rachel Corrie – My Name Is Rachel (corporate social responsibility); V.K. Johansen – The Drone War (targeted killings); + additional sources and resources, electronic and otherwise.

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation (you need to do the assigned reading beforehand) and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to the readings (and occasional quizzes – as/if required), writing assignments will include two research assignments, one written panel presentation, a final paper prospectus, and the final paper itself. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

2 research assignments (750 wds each = 1500 wds) = 30%; 1 reaction paper (750 wds) = 15%; 1 paper proposal (750 wds) = 15%; final paper (1800-2400 wds) = 30%

= 90% of the final grade (grading on a plus/minus basis)

For the research/writing papers, specific assignment sheets will be distributed two weeks before the paper is due. For the final paper proposal, the assignment sheet will be distributed midway through the semester. The papers are due in class on the date indicated on the syllabus.

E 397N • Lit Wrnts: Palestn/Chile/Libya

36370 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 200
(also listed as C L 382, MES 386 )
show description

“Universal Jurisdiction”:  Literary Warrants from Palestine, Chile, and Libya

Once upon a time (or “imagine,” if you will) there were three worlds, or at least since 1952 when French pundit Alfred Sauvy allegedly coined the term “third world” to designate, after the fashion of the 1789 French revolutionary “third estate,” those geopolitical spaces that were then neither “capitalist“ (first world) nor “communist” (second world). Representatives of the “third world” convened in Bandung in 1955 to chart a working agenda for the prospects of their decolonizing, eventually national, agendas. According to Roland Burke (2010), the Bandung Conference provided a “revolutionary influence of decolonization” on “human rights history.” That same “human rights history,” however, remains ever more contested today – at once challenged and revered from whatever is left of the erstwhile “three worlds.” I plan to examine those continued critical challenges and their attendant contemporary obeisances by way of three continuing cases represented in literary and documentary narrative and located in three geopolitical contexts: Palestine, Chile, and Libya: 1. the question of Palestine – from the “right of return” as narrated in Ghassan Kanafani’s Palestinian novellas Men in the Sun (1962) and Returning to Haifa (1969) to the human rights violations documented in the Goldstone Report on Israel’s “Operation Cast Lead” (2009); 2. the Pinochet extradition, with reference to Latin America’s “dirty wars” and the age of truth commissions, as painfully and painstakingly depicted in Chilean Ariel Dorfman’s Death and the Maiden (1990-91) and Exorcising Terror (2002); and 3. the controversy over the International Criminal Court and Africa, with special focus on the controversial ICC indictments in 2011 of Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi and their historical background as described by South African Ruth First in Libya: The Elusive Revolution (1974) and Libyan Hisham Matar’s novels In the Country of Men (2006) and Anatomy of a Disappearance (2011). How, in other words, might the once upon a time imagined Bandung agenda of non-alignment find popular renewal – or neoliberal obstruction – in the lexicon and storytelling of universal jurisdiction and the litigiously literary narratives of international adjudication?

Readings:

Ghassan Kanafani. Men in the Sun and Returning to Haifa

Ariel Dorfman. Death and the Maiden and Exorcising Terror

Ruth First. Libya: The Elusive Revolution

Hisham Matar. In the Country of Men and Anatomy of a Disappearance

+ “paraliterary” readings from legal studies, history, cultural studies, etc

E 314J • Human Rights: Theories/Pracs

34915 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 203
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34915            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  BDP 319            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Human Rights/Social Justice will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study and practices of human rights at home and around the world. Drawing on materials from the humanities, social sciences, law, fine arts, and public policy, the course will engage both historical precedents and contemporary debates over the relevance of a human rights discourse to academic inquiry and extracurricular advocacy. Divided into five sections, the syllabus is designed not only to encourage a broad understanding of human rights’ emergence into current public policy and persistent humanitarian narratives, but to facilitate as well the opportunity to research these concerns through specific topical examples, both issue-oriented and regionally-grounded.

Part One, “Ideals/Ideas – Past, Present, Future” examines the longer story leading to the contemporary use of the language of human rights. Readings will trace developments from the “civilizing mission” of 19th-century colonialism to humanitarian interventions of the 20th and 21st centuries, and from the Declaration on the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789) to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948). Part Two will then turn to “Institutional Instantiations” through a close reading of some of the key international instruments attempting to legislate human rights and social justice, together with representative accounts from recent international campaigns and non-governmental organizations. With this historical and documentary background in mind, the next two sections of the course will focus on particular examples. Part Three, “Geographies of Human Rights/Social justice Work,” will look at regional examples such as Latin America’s post-conflict resolutions, and Part 4, “Contemporary Issues,” will turn to issue-oriented examples such as human rights after 9/11. Finally, in Part Five, “Conflicted Debates: Human Rights Skeptics and Human Rights Believers,” we will have the opportunity to reflect on our initial question as to the relevance of a human rights/social justice discourse to academic inquiry and extracurricular advocacy.

Texts: Readings will include documentary materials and critical articles, chapters of books, literary examples, all available either electronically and/or in a course packet. One feature of the course will be the opportunity for students to research and contribute to the building of human rights/social justice interdisciplinary archives.

Requirements & Grading: 2 research/writings assignments (750 wds); 1 reaction paper (750 wds) – to a campus lecture, symposium, conference, or event; 1 panel presentation (750 wds) – as part of a group project into “geographies” and/or “issues”; 1 final paper proposal (750 wds); 1 final paper (1800-2400 wds).

E 356 • The European Novel

35860 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 105
(also listed as EUS 347 )
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B            Areas:  III / F

Unique #:  35860            Flags:  Global cultures / non-Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  EUS 347            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus, The Plague; Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa; Additional critical readings.

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers and one written panel presentation. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

Regular quizzes and short assignments: 40%; Paper proposal: 15%; End-of-term paper: 25%; Attendance and participation: 20%.

E 328 • English Novel In 19th Century

35370 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 103
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B            Areas:  III / F

Unique #:  35370            Flags:  Global cultures, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The "Victorian novel" acquires its literary-historical designation from Queen Victoria, England's ruling monarch for 64 years, from l837 to l901. For all the monarchical stability, however, profound social, political and cultural changes marked this period in English history and the Victorian age might be variously referred to as the "age of ideology," the "age of capital" or the "age of imperialism." Our readings in the Victorian novel and its immediate precursors will examine its place in European literary history, but that history will be considered as part of a larger process of socio-political changes in domestic England and in the expanding British Empire. The l9th century witnessed enormous industrial development and with it the emergence of the working class as a coherent force. Women, the working class, and empire continued to exert pressure on the literary production of the last half of the l9th century and these concerns will inform our reading of the later novels as well set in the imperial reaches of Africa and India.

Texts: Jane Austen, Emma; Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South; Charles Dickens, Hard Times; Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown's School Days; George Gissing, New Grub Street; H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon's Mines; Rudyard Kipling, Kim.

Requirements & Grading: 2 research essays (750 wds each), 25%; 1 response paper (750 wds), 15%; 1 paper proposal (500 wds), 15%; 1 final research paper (1800-2400 wds), 25%; Attendance and participation, 20%.

E 397N • Orientalism And Imperialism

35900 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 221
(also listed as C L 382 )
show description

This course in "orientalism and imperialism" will be organized around a set of paradigmatic narratives grounded in canonical literary texts and a selection of primary and historical documents that contributed to the ideological, political and archival grounds for the European colonial project in the 19th and early 20th centuries, with particular reference to Africa and the Indian subcontinent. Since the publication of Edward Said's Orientalism in 1979, the controversial issues of orientalism and the practices of imperialism have figured critically in determining the contemporary redefinitions of the fields of literary studies and the liberal arts. In our reading of a selection of canonical texts that underwrote the orientalist-imperialist endeavor, we will attempt to examine both the literary and documentary parameters of that epochal project.

Readings, which include multiple layers of these assorted documents (bureaucratic/official, popular, personal, and literary, as well as illustrative), will be organized around strategic moments. These moments, attached to geographical loci and central to the redrawing of the map of empire, are further designated to counter standard historical models of colonialism, with their emphases on teleology and progress.

Organizing Texts/Topics:

Jules Verne. Around the World in 80 Days (the Imperial Wager)

Henry M. Stanley. Autobiography  (the Scramble for Africa)

Rudyard Kipling. Kim (the Great Game)

H. Rider Haggard. King Solomon’s Mines (Raw Materials/Literary Gems)

+ Barbara Harlow and Mia Carter (eds). Archives of Empire (vols 1 and 2)

Each section, according to the specificities of the issues posed by the particular historical circumstances and geographical conditions, will include such documents as official policy statements, political speeches and government papers, journalistic accounts and editorial opinions, as well as personal narratives, private memoirs, and literary texts. Such diversity of materials should give evidence of the various ways in which imperialism was prosecuted as well as of the multiple means and media through which it was packaged and publicized.

Requirements:

1 class presentation (to be submitted in written form – 1200-1500 wds)

1 review essay (1200-1500 wds)

final project: paper proposal (300-500 wds) in response to a CFP, that would include an extended and annotated working research bibliography (10-15pp)

E 356 • The European Novel

35365 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 204
(also listed as EUS 347 )
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B            Areas:  III

Unique #:  35365            Flags:  Global cultures, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  EUS 347            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus, The Plague; Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa; Additional critical readings. 

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers and one written panel presentation. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

Two short papers: 30%; Paper proposal: 15%; End-of-term paper: 25%; Response paper: 10%; Attendance and participation: 20%.

E 397N • Literature And Human Rights

35725 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 323
show description

Literature And Human Rights

Human rights reporting, itself a genre in the contemporary world of writing and rights, entails both documentation and intervention. A recording of facts and events, of abuses of individual lives and national histories, as well as an effort to correct an official record that has systematically obscured those abuses, the writing of human rights draws of necessity on conventions of narrative and auto/biography, of dramatic representation, and discursive practices. Indeed, the thirty articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that was proclaimed by the General Assembly of the United Nations in December 1948 translated the standard literary paradigm of individual versus society and the narrative practices of emplotment and closure, by mapping an identification of the individual within a specifically international construction of rights and responsibilities. The Declaration, that is, can be read as recharting, for example, the trajectory and peripeties of the classic bildungsroman.  While that Declaration has, since its adoption, been as much abused as used by governments throughout the world, peoples and their representatives continue to appeal to its principles. It is those written appeals, the reports of human rights monitors, the documentation of international organizations such as Amnesty International, and the narratives of individuals recounting their efforts to reconstruct a human history, that will form the basis of our discussion of the emergence of a discourse of rights in the 19th century and the altered relationships between writing and human rights at the end of the 20th, and the place of a new body of literature, the active intersection of the cultural and the political, in a changing contemporary international order.

READINGS: (subject to change)

Nuruddin Farah. Crossbones

Hisham Matar. In the Country of Men

Hisham Matar. Anatomy of a Disappearance

James Kilgore. We Are All Zimbabweans Now

Moazzam Begg. Enemy Combatant

+ human rights reports and other electronic resources

Requirements:

In addition to regular attendance, active participation in class discussions, and your part in a panel presentation, four written assignments are required:

1. panel presentation: this written assignment should be a critical report (with annotated bibliography) resulting from the research that you did as part of your contribution to your panel (approx. 1500 words). This assignment is to be submitted on the day of your panel presentation and copies of the annotated bibliography should be provided for the entire class.

2. book review: this review can be on any novel of interest to you, but it must relate that work to questions/issues of “literature and human rights” (approx. 1000 words)

3. reaction paper: attendance at one of the Rapoport Center’s Human Rights Happy Hour speaker series to be followed by a “reaction paper” that relates the presentation to our discussion of “literature and human rights”

4. final paper proposal + annotated bibliography: this final assignment should be a proposal (500 wds) for a paper to be presented either at a conference or for an edited volume (sample CFPs will be distributed). It should be accompanied by an annotated bibliography (at least 15 works – either books and/or articles) and the annotations should consist of critical readings of the materials selected.

E 314J • Human Rights: Theories/Pracs

34505 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 206
show description

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Human Rights/Social Justice will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study and practices of human rights at home and around the world. Drawing on materials from the humanities, social sciences, law, fine arts, and public policy, the course will engage both historical precedents and contemporary debates over the relevance of a human rights discourse to academic inquiry and extracurricular advocacy. Divided into five sections, the syllabus is designed not only to encourage a broad understanding of human rights’ emergence into current public policy and persistent humanitarian narratives, but to facilitate as well the opportunity to research these concerns through specific topical examples, both issue-oriented and regionally-grounded.

Part One, “Ideals/Ideas – Past, Present, Future” examines the longer story leading to the contemporary use of the language of human rights. Readings will trace developments from the “civilizing mission” of 19th-century colonialism to humanitarian interventions of the 20th and 21st centuries, and from the Declaration on the Rights of Man and Citizen (1789) to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948). Part Two will then turn to “Institutional Instantiations” through a close reading of some of the key international instruments attempting to legislate human rights and social justice, together with representative accounts from recent international campaigns and non-governmental organizations. With this historical and documentary background in mind, the next two sections of the course will focus on particular examples. Part Three, “Geographies of Human Rights/Social justice Work,” will look at regional examples such as Africa’s Congo and the Great Lakes Region, and Part 4, “Contemporary Issues,” will turn to issue-oriented examples such as human rights after 9/11, HIV/AIDS, transitional justice, or international peacekeeping. Finally, in Part Five, “Conflicted Debates: Human Rights Skeptics and Human Rights Believers,” we will have the opportunity to reflect on our initial question as to the relevance of a human rights/social justice discourse to academic inquiry and extracurricular advocacy. 

Texts: Readings will include documentary materials and critical articles, chapters of books, literary examples, all available either electronically and/or in a course packet. One feature of the course will be the opportunity for students to research and contribute to the building of human rights/social justice interdisciplinary archives.

Requirements & Grading: 2 research/writings assignments (750 wds); 1 reaction paper (750 wds) – to a campus lecture, symposium, conference, or event; 1 panel presentation (750 wds) – as part of a group project into “geographies” and/or “issues”; 1 final paper proposal (750 wds); 1 final paper (1800-2400 wds).

E 360S • Literature & Social Justice

35390 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 103
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: What do “humanitarianism” and “human rights” have to do with the humanities? In what ways can literature contribute to a consideration of these pressing questions in the early 21st century? In a globalizing culture, our interest will be both international and domestic, looking at ways in which personal stories contribute to political histories. In focusing on topics of “social justice,” we will consider such questions as truth commissions, genocide, hunger, HIV/Aids, women’s rights, children, immigration and refugees. 

Texts: Henning Mankell – Chronicler of the Winds (social justice and storytelling); Sindiwe Magona – Mother to Mother (truth commissions); Ghassan Kanafani – Men in the Sun and Returning to Haifa (refugees); Gil Courtemanche – A Sunday at the Pool in Kigali (genocide and HIV/AIDS); Ruth First – 117 Days (torture); Moazzam Begg – Enemy Combatant (Guantánamo); + additional sources and resources, electronic and otherwise.

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and discussion and attendance will be emphasized. In addition to readings and occasional quizzes (as/if required), writing assignments will include two research assignments, one written panel presentation, a final paper prospectus, and the final paper itself.

2 research assignments (1000 wds each = 2000 wds); 1 panel presentation (750 wds); 1 paper proposal (750 wds); 1 final paper (2400-3000 wds) = 85% of the final grade

+ two response papers (ungraded)

Attendance and participation = 15% of the final grade.

E 356 • The European Novel

35640 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 204
(also listed as EUS 347 )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus. The Plague; Hannah Arendt. Rahel Varnhagen; Additional critical readings

Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers and one written panel presentation. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

Two short papers: 30%; Paper proposal: 15%; End-of-Term Paper: 25%; Panel presentation:10%; Attendance and participation: 20%

E 360S • Africa & The Victorians-Honors

35685 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 210
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The "scramble for Africa," consolidated at the Berlin Conference, held in 1884-85, divided the terrain of the African continent among the numerous European contenders. The course will examine both the literary history of that "scramble" together with its historical and documentary record of "civilization, Christianity and commerce." The selection of materials will range from the travel accounts of adventurers and missionaries such as Livingstone, Stanley, and Conrad to Mark Twain's scathing critique of Belgium's King Leopold's enterprises in the Congo. Dickens, for example, had execrated the missionaries in his caricature of Mrs Jellyby in Bleak House, but it would also be missionaries who testified against King Leopold's atrocities. The work of a Richard Burton, on the other hand, like that of other explorers and intellectual tourists, can further exemplify the disciplinary consolidation of imperialism in such institutions as the Royal Geographic Society. John Ruskin's Oxford Inaugural Lecture, said to have inspired Cecil Rhodes, is still another example of the reciprocity between the world of letters and the arenas of political expansionism. The British imperial project, however, was not without its contemporary critics, and we will examine a series of crises of empire, such as the Boer War at the turn of the century and the conflictual contradictions that were complicating the imperial project; the Congo reform movement with its combination of literary representations and human rights reports of the time; and today’s debates over Afro-pessimism v African Renaissance.

Texts: The course will be organized around a set of literary artifacts and complemented by materials from the documentary record, the "imperial archive,” and with reference to contemporary events.

1. The Scramble for Africa -- Joseph Conrad. Heart of Darkness

2. The Anglo-Boer War -- Sol Plaatje. Mafeking Diary

3. Mines, Magnates, Minerals -- H. Rider Haggard. King Solomon’s Mines

4. From the Scramble for Africa to the Scramble for Contracts -- John Le Carré. The Constant Gardener

+ academic articles and archival documents

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and discussion and attendance will be emphasized.  In addition to readings and occasional quizzes (as/if required), writing assignments will include two research assignments, one written panel presentation, one response paper, a final paper prospectus, and the final paper itself.

2 research assignments (750 wds each = 1500 wds); 1 panel presentation (750 wds); 1 response paper (750 wds); 1 paper proposal (750 wds); final paper (3000 wds); = 80% of final grade.

E 397N • Scramble For Africa

35130 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.118
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The "scramble for Africa," consolidated at the Berlin Conference, held in 1884-85, divided the terrain of the African continent among the numerous European contenders. The course will examine both the literary history of that "scramble" together with its historical and documentary record of "civilization, Christianity and commerce." The selection of materials will range from the travel accounts of adventurers and missionaries such as Livingstone, Stanley, and Conrad to Mark Twain's scathing critique of Belgium's King Leopold's enterprises in the Congo. Dickens, for example, had execrated the missionaries in his caricature of Mrs Jellyby in Bleak House, but it would also be missionaries who testified against King Leopold's atrocities. The work of a Richard Burton, on the other hand, like that of other explorers and intellectual tourists, can further exemplify the disciplinary consolidation of imperialism in such institutions as the Royal Geographic Society. John Ruskin's Oxford Inaugural Lecture, said to have inspired Cecil Rhodes, is still another example of the reciprocity between the world of letters and the arenas of political expansionism. The British imperial project, however, was not without its contemporary critics, and we will examine a series of crises of empire, such as the Boer War at the turn of the century and the conflictual contradictions that were complicating the imperial project; the Congo reform movement  with its combination of literary representations and human rights reports of the time; and today’s debates over Afro-pessimism v African Renaissance.

Readings

The course will be organized around a set of literary artifacts and complemented by materials from the documentary record, the "imperial archive,” and with reference to contemporary events.

1. The Scramble for Africa
Joseph Conrad. Heart of Darkness

2. The Anglo-Boer War
Olive Schreiner. Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland

3. Mines, Magnates, Minerals
John Buchan. Prester John

4. From the Scramble for Africa to the Scramble for Contracts
John Le Carré. The Constant Gardener


E 356 • The European Novel-W

34870 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 PAR 204
(also listed as C L 323, EUS 347 )
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E356/EUS347/CL323 The European Novel

Barbara Harlow, Spring 2010
Parlin 26  /  471-8716  /  bharlow@mail.utexas.edu
office hours: T/Th 11-12.30 (and by appointment)

“European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and the premises for our readings of a selection of classic European novels and their contemporary currency.

readings:

  • Victor Hugo. Notre-Dame of Paris
  • Jules Verne. Around the World in 80 Days
  • Joseph Conrad. The Secret Agent
  • Thomas Mann. Death in Venice
  • Albert Camus. The Plague
  • Hannah Arendt. Rahel Varnhagen
  • + critical articles

requirements

The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation (you need to do the assigned reading beforehand) and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to the readings (and occasional quizzes – as/if required), writing assignments will include two research assignments, one written panel presentation, a final paper prospectus, and the final paper itself. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

writing assignments

  • 2 research assignments (750 wds each = 1500 wds) = 30%
  • 1 panel presentation (750 wds) = 15%
  • 1 paper proposal (750 wds) = 15%
  • final paper (1800-2400 wds) = 30%
  • = 90% of the final grade (grading on a plus/minus basis)

For the research/writing papers, specific assignment sheets will be distributed two weeks before the paper is due. For the final paper proposal, the assignment sheet will be distributed before spring break. The papers are due in class on the date indicated on the syllabus.

NB: For all writing assignments, students should be aware – and observant – of UT’s policy on plagiarism. There are negative and positive reasons for this admonition: negative – you get in trouble if you don’t observe the policy; positive – by citing your sources, you join a community of scholars who share their work.

Other Notices:

Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: http://uwc.utexas.edu/home). The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

University policy is to respect religious holidays – and we will respect them as well. If, however, you will be absent for reason of religious observance and would like to share information about your respective traditions, these contributions will be welcome.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Finally, no cell-phones or computers are allowed in class – turn them off and put them away.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

UGS 302 • Humanitarian Aid Workers-W

64620 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MAI 220C
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UGS302 (64620) R2P: STORIES FROM HUMANITARIAN AID WORKERS

Barbara Harlow  /  Fall 2009  /  T/Th 11-12.30
Office Hours: M 1-3 (Rapoport Center, Law School), T 12.30-2/Th 12.30-1.30 (Parlin 26) and by appointment
bharlow@mail.utexas.edu

Description:

“Responsibility to protect” (or R2P) is yet another formulation for “humanitarian interventionism.” What difference does it make? Our readings of the personal accounts of aid workers and advocates will attempt to address some of the challenges, crises, contradictions, recriminations – and rewards – entailed by the “responsibility to protect.”

Selected readings include:

  • Another Day in Paradise: Front Line Stories from International Aid Workers
  • Mahvish Rukhsana Khan. My Guantanamo Diary: The Detainees and the Stories They Told Me (translator)
  • Jonny Steinberg. Sizwe’s Test: A Young Man’s Journey Through Africa’s AIDS Epidemic (journalist)
  • Kenneth Cain, Heidi Postlewait, Andrew Thomson. Emergency Sex and Other Desperate Measures (UN aid workers)
  • David Kennedy. The Dark Sides of Virtue: Reassessing International Humanitarianism (law professor)
  • Clea Koff. The Bone Woman (forensic anthropologist)

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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