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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Elizabeth A Hedrick

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1986, Columbia University

Elizabeth A Hedrick

Contact

Biography

Dr. Hedrick specializes in Restoration and 18th-century English literature and women's studies.  Her teaching interests include 18th-century fiction and drama, 18th-century intellectual history--with a special focus on the history of sympathy and philanthropy--and the works of Samuel Johnson.  She has published essays on Samuel Johnson's Dictionary, Hester Piozzi, and Sir Kenelm Digby, and she is now completing a study of the essentialism debate in 20th-century feminist theory, entitled The Discipline Question in Feminism: U. S. Feminist Theory and the Institution of Women's Studies Since 1973.  She is married and has two children.

Interests

Feminist theory since 1970; gender and science; eighteenth-century novel and drama; Samuel Johnson; eighteenth-century lexicography; history of charity and philanthropy.

E 316L • British Literature

34240-34265 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
show description

E 316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  Hedrick, E

Unique #:  34230-34265

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures; Ethics & Leadership

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed? Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor?  If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

This variant of E316L is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden) Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Test 1 (20%); Test 2 (30%); Test 3 (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316L • British Literature

34270-34305 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

E 316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  Hedrick, E

Unique #:  34270-34305

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures; Ethics & Leadership (pending approval)

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (class handout), course packet available at Jenn’s.

Requirements & Grading: Test 1 (20%); Test 2 (30%); Test 3 (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316L • British Literature

35300-35345 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E

Unique #:  35300-35345

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures; Ethics & Leadership

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed? Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor?  If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

This variant of E316L is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden) Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Test 1 (20%); Test 2 (30%); Test 3 (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316L • British Literature

35350-35395 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E

Unique #:  35350-35395

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global Cultures

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (class handout), course packet available at Jenn’s.

Requirements & Grading: Test 1 (20%); Test 2 (30%); Test 3 (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35585-35630 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E

Unique #:  35585-35630

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed? Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor?  If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

This variant of E316k is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden) Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35635-35680 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E

Unique #:  35635-35680

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (class handout), course packet available at Jenn’s.

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35445-35490 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35445-35490            Flags:  Ethics and leadership; Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

This variant of E316K is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed?  Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor? If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden); Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35495-35535 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35495-35540            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (Grove edition), Elizabeth Hedrick, editor, Virtue and Heroism: Readings in English Literature (Kendall/Hunt).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

83495 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm BEN 1.122
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  83495            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (Grove edition), xeroxed course packet.

Requirements & Grading: Two tests (30% each); reading quizzes and/or journal entries (30%); class participation (10%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35055-35065 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35020-35065            Flags:  Ethics and leadership; Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

This variant of E316K is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed?  Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor? If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden); Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35090-35110 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick, E            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35070-35115            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (Grove edition), Elizabeth Hedrick, editor, Virtue and Heroism: Readings in English Literature (Kendall/Hunt).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35100-35145 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35100-35145            Flags:  Global cultures, Ethics and leadership

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

This variant of E316K is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed?  Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor? If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden); Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35150-35195 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Hedrick            Areas:  n/a / B

Unique #:  35150-35195            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (Grove edition), Elizabeth Hedrick, editor, Virtue and Heroism: Readings in English Literature (Kendall/Hunt).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

34950-34985 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
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Instructor:  Hedrick            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34950-34985            Flags:  Global cultures, Ethics and leadership

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

This variant of E316K is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test. 

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed?  Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor? If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden); Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35025-35060 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
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This variant of E316k is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program. 

 Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --

This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed?  Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor? If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity?

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden); Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

35067-35103 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am FAC 21
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This variant of E316k is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test. 

Description: Literature of Virtue and Heroism –

This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Middle Ages to the present, surveying a wide range of genres and literary forms. The readings will have a thematic focus on ideas of virtue and heroism. Specifically, we'll study the ways in which notions of virtue and heroism have taken shape over the course of English history; the ways in which these notions are depicted differently in different literary forms; and the ways in which the literary forms themselves change through time, along with the ideals of virtue or heroism they convey. In the first half of the course, we'll consider the ways in which these notions are or are not distinguishable from one another, separating out after a long period of being substantially identical. In the second half of the course we'll examine the ways in which the creative writer becomes a particular kind of hero, one that resembles heroes from earlier eras in some ways and differs from them in others. Throughout the course we'll consider how men and women (and male and female characters in literature) are or are not able to be virtuous or heroic in certain contexts. The approach to the materials will be basically historical, and the lectures will provide historical, intellectual and other kinds of information as a way to illuminate the readings on the syllabus.

Texts: Anon., Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition), John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition), William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition), Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Penguin edition), Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition), Samuel Beckett, Happy Days (Grove edition), Elizabeth Hedrick, editor, Virtue and Heroism: Readings in English Literature (Kendall/Hunt).

Requirements & Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

34200-34245 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am WEL 1.316
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Course Description: Literature of Charity and Philanthropy --
This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. In it we will examine the cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list, discuss differences among various literary genres, and consider the ways in which these genres have been employed in different historical periods. The readings for the course all focus in some way on issues pertaining to charity and philanthropy, however. So during the semester we'll also examine the ways in which the concept of charity has been defined in different historical periods and consider the ways in which writers from each period critique their contemporaries in terms of that concept--or critique the concept itself. More specifically, we will ponder a variety of moral and ethical issues that have persistently been bound up with charitable ideals. How, in each age, have proper or worthy charitable objects been defined? What qualities have made an object of charity more or less appealing? When and how was the idea of “marketing” philanthropy developed? Does the liberal idea of charity, broadly defined, always involve some kind of pay-off for the donor? If so, what kind? A reward in heaven? Warm self-approval? Social credit or “points” with an individual or group? How have different writers, at different times, regarded the distinctions--for both donors and recipients--between personal or individual giving, giving through a private group, and giving through public or governmentally organized structures such as a tax system? How, with these distinctions in mind, have different writers at different times characterized the best ways to distribute charity? This variant of E316k is especially recommended for students in the SEN strand of the Bridging Disciplines Program.

Texts: Chaucer - Canterbury Tales (General Prologue and Prioress' Tale); William Shakespeare - King Lear (Arden); Isaac Barrow - “The Duty and Reward of Bounty to the Poor”; Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers; Jonathan Swift - “A Modest Proposal”; Samuel Johnson - The Life of Richard Savage; Laurence Sterne - A Sentimental Journey (Oxford); William Wordsworth - “The Old Cumberland Beggar”; Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol; Robert Browning - "Fra Lippo Lippi"; William Booth [W. T. Stead] - In Darkest England; G. B. Shaw - Major Barbara (Harlan Davidson).

Grading: Midterm (30%); five short quizzes (20%); final (30%); discussion section work (20%).

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

E 359 • Eng Drama From 1660 To 1900

34720 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CRD 007B
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Cross-listing:  Meets with EUS 347

Course Description: Restoration and eighteenth-century drama -- In this course we will read plays written and produced in England between 1660 and the early 20th century. The theater reflects and helps create the culture of its time to an unusual degree. So we will examine the plays on the reading list with an eye to several matters: the political and historical contexts in which the plays appeared; the regulation of the stage and the publication practices of playwrights; questions of staging--e.g., acting, scene design, and costuming; and the belletristic qualities (or lack thereof) of the plays themselves. In an effort to think about the plays as more than purely literary documents, we will read portions of scenes from many of them in class and discuss at length the larger question of what it means to "read" a play.

Texts: British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan, ed. G. H. Nettleton and A. E. Case, SIU Press; The Plays of Oscar Wilde, ed. John Lahr, Vintage edition; Bernard Shaw's Plays, ed. Warren S. Smith, Norton edition; 
Speedway packet, containing material by Dryden, Wycherley, Jerrold, Bulwer-Lytton, Gilbert and Sullivan, and Pinero.

Grading: Two short scene readings, 2-3 pages, one on each scene for which you lead discussion. Further information about these papers will be given in class: 5% each; 
One short review of a critical essay on one of the plays you've read: 15%; 
One research paper, 10-15 pages: 25%; 
Two tests on material covered in class: 30%; 
Participation in class discussions: 20% Note 1: You must complete all the above assignments in order to pass the course. Note 2: No Q drops will be given past the normal drop deadline without a well-substantiated non-academic excuse.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 392M • 18th-C Drama: Codes Of Conduct

35080 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CRD 007B
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English drama of the Restoration and eighteenth century has been called by one critic a “powerfully hegemonic apparatus.”  This characterization is apt, given the drama’s ability to critique contemporary political issues and to offer patterns for moral and ethical behavior to a wide range of viewers: to male and female aristocrats; to female and male servants; to single people and married people; to the rich and the poor; to tradesmen, both rising and successful; to native peoples in lands the English regarded as exotic; and to the English themselves as occupiers of, or visitors to, such lands.  In this course we will examine the various cues for social behavior--and, more broadly, social order--offered by a wide range of plays written between 1660 and the later eighteenth century.  We will consider how the plays reflect, contradict, or otherwise respond to extra-theatrical political and social issues.  At the same time, we will consider the ways in which differences of genre among the plays shape the signals the plays send, or might be expected to send.  We will also examine the ways in which the political and social pressures placed upon the drama reshape its various sub-genres over time, as in the case of the transformation of the heroic into the sentimental with the coalescence of bourgeois values around the turn of the century.  Over the semester we will remain attentive to two additional concerns that will receive intensive consideration on a topical if not sustained basis: the ways in which playwrights’ borrowings from or revisions of earlier texts signal a change of ethos for issues or points of behavior raised in the earlier texts; and the ways in which matters of staging and production affect the moral and political concerns with which the plays are preoccupied. 
   
This course is intended as an introduction to the eighteenth century generally, as well as to its drama.  No previous experience with the period is expected or required. 

Requirements

One research paper (15-20 pages) - 40%
Two presentations on secondary material - 20%
Two shorter (5-page) papers - 20%
Participation - 20%

Readings

John Dryden - The Conquest of Granada (part one)
---------- - All for Love
George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham et al. - The Rehearsal
Aphra Behn - The Rover
Willian Wycherley - The Country Wife
Thomas Otway - Venice Preserv’d
Jeremy Collier - A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage
Colley Cibber - The Careless Husband
Richard Steele - The Conscious Lovers
Nicholas Rowe - The Tragedy of Jane Shore
Susannah Centlivre - A Bold Stroke for a Wife
George Lillo - The London Merchant
David Garrick and George Colman - The Clandestine Marriage
Richard Cumberland - The West Indian
Oliver Goldsmith - An Essay on the Theatre
---------- - She Stoops to Conquer
Richard Brinsley Sheridan - The School for Scandal

Secondary Materials by: Barish, Thompson, Hume, Beach, Kewes, Braverman, Huse, Hynes, Cole, Rogers Sedgwick, and others

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

83030 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm WCH 1.120
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Course Description: This course is intended to provide an overview of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. During the semester we will examine briefly the historical and intellectual contexts of the works on the reading list and compare the ways in which particular ideas and genres appear in various literary periods. The course is also intended to offer students experience in reading literary works closely and writing about them clearly and cogently.

Texts:

  1. Anon. [Marie Borroff, translator], Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Norton edition)
  2. John Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton edition)
  3. William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part One (Norton edition)
  4. Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Norton edition)
  5. Elizabeth Hedrick, editor, Virtue and Heroism: Readings in English Literature (Kendall/Hunt)

Grading:

  1. Mid-term - 30% 
  2. Second test - 30%
  3. Quizzes (4, short-answer) - 20%
  4. Discussion section work - 20%
  5. Other -
  • Attendance is required for all discussion section meetings.  Students may miss one discussion section meeting without an excuse. Thereafter, the attendance grade will drop ten full points for every class missed.
  • The final grade of any student who fails to take the mid-term or the second test at the times scheduled will be lowered by one full grade per test missed.­ 

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.  

For more information, please download the full course syllabus.

E 359 • English Drama, 1660-1900-Hon-W

34885 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 305
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Prof. Hedrick       Office: Parlin 226
E359 W (Honors) Spring, 2010       Office Hours: TTH 11-12:30 
Unique #34885       and by appointment
TTH 12:30-2       Office Phone: 471-8705
PAR 305       eahedrick@mail.utexas.ed

Course Policy

I.          Objectives.  In this course we will read plays written and produced in England between
1660 and the early 20th century.  Because the theater reflects and responds to the culture of its time to an unusual degree, we will examine the plays on the reading list with an eye to several matters: the political and historical contexts in which the plays appeared; the regulation of the stage and the publication practices of playwrights; questions of staging--e.g., acting, scene design, and costuming; and the belletristic qualities (or lack thereof) of the plays themselves.  As an effort to think about the plays as more than purely literary documents, we will read portions of scenes from many of them in class and discuss at length the larger question of what it means to “read” a play. 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: English

34800-34845 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm FAC 21
show description

Prof. Hedrick                                                                                      Office: Parlin 226
E359 W (Honors) Spring, 2010                                                            Office Hours: TTH 11-12:30 
Unique #34885                                                                                                and by appointment
TTH 12:30-2                                                                                       Office Phone: 471-8705
PAR 305                                                                                             eahedrick@mail.utexas.edu

                                                            Course Policy

I.            Objectives

In this course we will read plays written and produced in England between 1660 and the early 20th century.  Because the theater reflects and responds to the culture of its time to an unusual degree, we will examine the plays on the reading list with an eye to several matters: the political and historical contexts in which the plays appeared; the regulation of the stage and the publication practices of playwrights; questions of staging--e.g., acting, scene design, and costuming; and the belletristic qualities (or lack thereof) of the plays themselves.  As an effort to think about the plays as more than purely literary documents, we will read portions of scenes from many of them in class and discuss at length the larger question of what it means to “read” a play. 

II.            Texts.

A.            British Dramatists from Dryden to Sheridan, ed. George Nettleton and Arthur Case. SIU Press.   
B.            Wycherley, William.  The Country Wife.  Norton edition. 
C.            Behn, Oroonoko, The Rover and Other Works.  Penguin edition. 
D.            Garrick, David, and George Colman.  The Clandestine Marriage.  Broadview edition. 
E.            Centlivre, Susannah.  A Bold Stroke for a Wife.  Broadview edition. 
F.             Speedway packet, containing plays and other materials. 

III.            Requirements.

A.            Two ten-minute presentations, each of which will address the ways in which an assigned essay illuminates a scene in or a problem raised by the play scheduled for discussion.  (A student making a presentation will effectively help lead class discussion on the day on which he or she presents.)  20 % (10% each)

B.            One three to five-page essay, which will critique an article on a play scheduled for discussion.  20% 

C.            One 15 to 20-page paper, on a topic of your choice, selected with Prof. Hedrick's guidance and approval.  (For due dates, see schedule.) (40%) 

D.            A draft of this essay, which will be commented on and returned to you for revision.  (The grade you get on your finished paper will replace the grade you get on your draft.) 

E.            Participation in class discussions.  20%

Note: You must complete all the above assignments, including the paper draft, in order to pass the course. 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

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