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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Jacqueline M Henkel

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1985, University of Minnesota

Jacqueline M Henkel

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-4942
  • Office: PAR 14
  • Office Hours: TH 9:30-10:30 AM & F 9:30-11:30 AM
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Biography

Jacqueline Henkel is Associate Professor of English and a member of the language-linguistics group in her department.  She is affiliated with the Department of Rhetoric and Writing, and she is on the graduate committee for FLE.  Her research interests have included language and gender, linguistics in literary criticism, narrative, and speech act theory.  Currently, she is working on linguistics in composition instruction and on early American linguistic culture, specifically 17th century native American conversion narratives.  She is the author of The Language of Criticism:  Linguistic Theory and Literary Criticism (Cornell, 1996), as well as articles in PMLA, Poetics, and College English.

 

Recent Publications: Professor Henkel has written for the journals Poetics, Journal of Literary Semantics, College English, and PMLA, and she has published a full-length study of linguistics in Area X (entitled The Language of Criticism) with Cornell University Press. She is currently working on attitudes toward American Indian languages in 17th century linguistic culture.

 

Interests

The relation of linguistics to literary criticism; ordinary language philosophy; narrative theory; language and gender.

E 370W • Women In Captivity

35930 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.212
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

 Instructor:  Henkel, J

Unique #:  35930

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  WGS 345

Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will read captivity narratives by and about women. We will begin with an early American best-seller, a 17th century Puritan woman's account of her captivity among the Native Americans of New England. Later in the course we will read (or view) examples of this particularly American genre as it recurs in later autobiography, fiction, and film. We will read these narratives not just for the remarkable personal experiences they depict, but also for the cultural values, concerns, and anxieties they encode, particularly as these relate to experiences and outcomes imagined as possible for women.

Texts: (tentative list): --Michel Rene Hilliard d’Auberteuil, Miss McCrea: A Novel of the American Revolution (on-line). --Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives. --Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. --Deborah Larsen, The White. --Toni Morrison, A Mercy. --Susannah Haswell Rowson, Slaves in Algiers: Struggle for Freedom. --Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie. --Monica Sone, Nisei Daughter. --other on-line readings (Angela Carter, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie); secondary readings on-line (Axtell, Ebersole, Namias, etc.). --Film excerpts in class: Last of the Mohicans, Dances with Wolves, etc. --Films: Come See the Paradise, Not Without My Daughter (required to view outside of class)

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on quizzes (20%); 2) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed) (20% each; 40% total); 3) minor written and oral exercises, most to be completed in class (10%); 4) a course paper of 5-6 pages, in two drafts (20%); and 5) an abstract of 1-2 pages and (depending on class size) an oral presentation on secondary material (10%).

Attendance, class preparation, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

36140 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Instructor:  Henkel, J

Unique #:  36140

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Goals: The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses.  The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric.  Specifically, we will work to understand more about the linguistic and social sources of language variation; about how the discourses of the classroom reflect language variety; about teachers’ attitudes toward language variety and how these affect student outcomes; about effective pedagogical strategies; and about problems of language and public policy as these affect classroom practice.  The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) and dialects they and their future pupils speak.

Required Texts:

--Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, 2nd ed., Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence

Erlbaum, Mahwah and London, 2007.

--Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom,

New Press, 2nd ed., 2008.

 --Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge,

2nd ed., 2011.

--Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?:  Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College

Press, 2001.

--Additional readings in a course packet available at Speedway Copy (715 West 23rd St., ground floor of parking garage for University Towers dormitory) or on-line through Blackboard.

Recommended Texts:

--Crawford, James, Bilingual Education: History, Politics, Theory, and Practice, Bilingual Education Services, rev. 4th ed.,

1999 ; or new title, Educating English Learners: Language Diversity in the Classroom, 5th ed., 2004.

--Crawford, James, and Stephen Krashen , English Language Learners in American Classrooms:  101 Questions, 101 Answers, Scholastic, 2007.

--Dicker, Susan, Languages in America: A Pluralist View, 2nd ed. Multilingual Matters, 2nd ed., 2010.

--Wolfram, Walt, and Natalie Schilling-Estes, American English, Blackwell, 2nd ed., 2005.

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four to five minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 8-10 pages, two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are based on problems and tests (quizzes and problems 10%; exam average 40%) and on writing assignments (minor written assignments 10%; draft and final paper 40%). Attendance, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.

Final course grades are assigned relative to the overall performance of the class; in other words, scores are "curved" rather than absolute. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades. Final class scores may be rounded up or down, according to students' class participation and performance on minor and ungraded assignments.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction. Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35915 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.122
show description

Instructor:  Henkel, J            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35915            Flags: Cultural diversity, Independent inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Goals: The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses. The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric. Specifically, we will study: basic principles of language structure and change; the social dimensions of language variety; the linguistic history and linguistic diversity of the U.S.; English and commercial culture; language attitudes; pedagogical issues involving language acquisition and linguistic difference; linguistic diversity and the teaching of English language and literature; and problems of language and public policy. The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) they speak.

Required Texts:

--Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, 2nd ed., Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah and London, 2007.

--Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom, New Press, 2002.

 --Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 1997.

--Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?: Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College Press, 2001.

--Additional readings (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall or on-line through Blackboard).

Recommended Texts:

--Crawford, James, Bilingual Education: History, Politics, Theory, and Practice, Bilingual Education Services, rev. 4th ed., 1999.

--Dicker, Susan, Languages in America: A Pluralist View, 2nd ed. Multilingual Matters, 2003.

--Wolfram, Walt, and Natalie Schilling-Estes, American English, Blackwell, 2nd ed., 2005

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four to five minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 8-10 pages, two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are based on problems and tests (quizzes and problems 10%; exam average 40%) and on writing assignments (minor written assignments 10%; draft and final paper 40%). Attendance, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.

Final course grades are assigned relative to the overall performance of the class; in other words, scores are "curved" rather than absolute. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades. Final class scores may be rounded up or down, according to students' class participation and performance on minor and ungraded assignments.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction. Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

E 396L • Language Politics

36200 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 310
show description

Description: In this course we will read paradigm texts drawn from important modern language theories, first attending to each theory itself as much as possible on its own terms, then considering its uses, abuses, and applications both to literary interpretation and to English-language teaching.  The course will especially focus on political controversies surrounding these theories, "political" broadly construed so as to include both attempts to define literature as a social rather than solely aesthetic object and explicit curricular and legal controversies involving the teaching of English.

 

Topics/Readings:  TBD, but will probably include:

--initial assumptions (modern linguistics as inaugurated by Saussure)

--early semiotics (Prague School applications of Saussure [Jakobson, Mukarovsky])

--contemporary assumptions and discontents (Chomsky; literary grammars; debates about meaning and "mentalism")

--discourse models (speech act theory; literary and non-literary discourse [J. L. Austin, Searle])

--sociolinguistics and educational controversies (ideology of classroom English [Labov, Bourdieu, Heath, Smitherman])

--language and nation; English-language controversies (English-only movements; ideologies of second language learning in the U.S. [Tse, Crawford]).

 

Requirements:  A final paper (15 pp., submission of early draft is optional); an abstract or handout of 1-2 pages and an oral presentation on secondary material; discussion informed by required and optional readings.

 

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35615 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ B0.302
show description

Instructor:  Henkel, J            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35615            Flags: Cultural diversity, Independent inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: E 364T, 376L (Topic: The English Language and Its Social Context), 376L (Topic: The English Language in Its Social Context).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Goals: The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses. The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric. Specifically, we will study: basic principles of language structure and change; the social dimensions of language variety; the linguistic history and linguistic diversity of the U.S.; English and commercial culture; language attitudes; pedagogical issues involving language acquisition and linguistic difference; linguistic diversity and the teaching of English language and literature; and problems of language and public policy. The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) they speak.

Required Texts:

--Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, 2nd ed., Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah and London, 2007.

--Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom, New Press, 2002.

 --Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 1997.

--Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?: Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College Press, 2001.

--Additional readings (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall or on-line through Blackboard).

Recommended Texts:

--Crawford, James, Bilingual Education: History, Politics, Theory, and Practice, Bilingual Education Services, rev. 4th ed., 1999.

--Dicker, Susan, Languages in America: A Pluralist View, 2nd ed. Multilingual Matters, 2003.

--Wolfram, Walt, and Natalie Schilling-Estes, American English, Blackwell, 2nd ed., 2005

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four to five minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 8-10 pages, two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are based on problems and tests (quizzes and problems 10%; exam average 40%) and on writing assignments (minor written assignments 10%; draft and final paper 40%). Attendance, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.

Final course grades are assigned relative to the overall performance of the class; in other words, scores are "curved" rather than absolute. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades. Final class scores may be rounded up or down, according to students' class participation and performance on minor and ungraded assignments.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction. Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

E 370W • Women In Captivity

35645 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 303
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Henkel, J            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  35645            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will read captivity narratives by and about women. We will begin with an early American bestseller, a 17th-century Puritan woman's account of her captivity among the Native Americans of New England. Later in the course we will read (or view) examples of this particularly American genre as it recurs in later autobiography, fiction, and film. We will read these narratives not just for the remarkable personal experiences they depict, but also for the cultural values, concerns, and anxieties they encode, particularly as these relate to experiences and outcomes imagined as possible for women.

Texts:

--Michel Rene Hilliard d’Auberteuil, Miss McCrea: A Novel of the American Revolution (on Blackboard).

--Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives.

--Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

--Deborah Larsen, The White.

--Toni Morrison, A Mercy.

--Susannah Haswell Rowson, Slaves in Algiers: Struggle for Freedom.

--Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie.

--Monica Sone, Nisei Daughter.

--other Blackboard readings (Angela Carter, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie); secondary readings on Blackboard (Axtell, Ebersole, Namias, etc.).

--Films or film excerpts: Last of the Mohicans; Dances with Wolves; Not Without My Daughter.

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on quizzes (20%); 2) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed) (20% each; 40% total); 3) minor written and oral exercises, most to be completed in class (10%); 4) a course paper (in two drafts) (20%); and 5) an abstract of 1-2 pages and (depending on class size) an oral presentation on secondary material (10%).

Attendance, class preparation, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.

E 360K • English Grammar

35525 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Henkel, J            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35525            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 360K and LIN 360K may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: English Grammar examines the syntax or structure of present-day English. Its major aim is to encourage students to think about the English language and English grammar in a new way.

The term “grammar” describes both the linguistic knowledge that speakers of English share (an internalized or mental “grammar”) and any representation of linguistic conventions (a “grammar” or model of English). Thus one course aim is to make explicit the syntactic conventions speakers of English know unconsciously (Why do you interpret “Igor ran up a hill” differently than “Igor ran up a bill”?). A second course goal is to study ways of modeling language structure (How should we describe the linguistic conventions you just applied?). We will use traditional terminology as we investigate English syntax for some of the course, but we will also draw on the methods of generative grammar, especially as we consider alternative explanations for language structure and for linguistic knowledge. A final course aim is to consider English syntax in context. So we will also briefly discuss syntactic variation in American English (regional and class differences in speech), attitudes toward language variation, and controversies involving English usage.

Texts: Martha Kolln and Robert Funk, Understanding English Grammar, Allyn and Bacon, 8th ed., 2009. Course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall or on-line through electronic reserves).

Requirements & Grading: In order to pass this course, you must: 1) work consistently (if not always accurately) on weekly exercises; 2) earn a passing average score on quizzes; 3) complete all exams with a passing average score (no exam may be missed); 4) demonstrate familiarity with required readings; and 5) attend class regularly. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Course grades are calculated in two ways; the instructor counts the highest calculation as the student's final course average. Calculation #1: 25% of the grade based on quizzes, 25% on each of three exams. Calculation #2: 33% of the grade based on each exam. The purpose of the double-calculation system is to ensure that students can use quizzes as genuine learning opportunities. That is, you can use quizzes to improve your grade, but if you've been temporarily confused about something on a quiz you won't be penalized for that in your final average.

Class final course averages are then curved and assigned letter grades. Discussion and attendance are considered essential; thus, this letter grade may then be adjusted up or down (often one-half grade), depending on the student's attendance, class participation, and performance on collected but ungraded assignments. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction. Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35585 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Henkel, J            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35585            Flags: Cultural diversity, Independent inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: E 364T, 376L (Topic: The English Language and Its Social Context), 376L (Topic: The English Language in Its Social Context).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses. The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric. Specifically, we will study: basic principles of language structure and change; social dimensions of language variety; linguistic diversity in the U.S.; English and commercial culture; language attitudes; pedagogical issues involving language acquisition and linguistic difference; linguistic diversity and the teaching of English language and literature; and problems of language and public policy. The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) they speak.

Texts: Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence Erlbaum, 2nd ed., 2007; Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom, New Press, 2002; Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 1997; Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?: Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College Press, 2001; a course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall).

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four to five minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 6-8 pages, two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are based on problems and tests (quizzes and problems 10%; exam average 40%) and on writing assignments (minor written assignments 10%; draft and final paper 40%).  Attendance, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.

Final course grades are assigned relative to the overall performance of the class; in other words, scores are "curved" rather than absolute.  Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.  Final class scores may be rounded up or down, according to students' class participation and performance on minor and ungraded assignments.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction.  Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35405 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am GAR 1.134
show description

Instructor:  Henkel, J            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35405            Flags:  Writing; Independent inquiry, Cultural diversity

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: E 364T, 376L (Topic: The English Language and Its Social Context), 376L (Topic: The English Language in Its Social Context).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses. The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric. Specifically, we will study: basic principles of language structure and change; social dimensions of language variety; linguistic diversity in the U.S.; English and commercial culture; language attitudes; pedagogical issues involving language acquisition and linguistic difference; linguistic diversity and the teaching of English language and literature; and problems of language and public policy. The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) they speak.

Texts: Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence Erlbaum, 2nd ed., 2007; Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom, New Press, 2002; Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 1997; Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?: Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College Press, 2001; a course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall).

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (three; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 8-10 pages, in two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are calculated as follows: 15% of the grade is based on quizzes, problems, and ungraded writing assignments; 45% on exams (15% for each of three); 30% on the final paper; and 10% on class preparation and informed discussion. Regular attendance is considered essential, and unsatisfactory attendance marks are deducted from the final average.

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35420 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 204
show description

Only one of the following may be counted: E 364T, 376L (Topic: The English Language and Its Social Context), 376L (Topic: The English Language in Its Social Context).

 Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses. The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric. Specifically, we will study: basic principles of language structure and change; social dimensions of language variety; linguistic diversity in the U.S.; English and commercial culture; language attitudes; pedagogical issues involving language acquisition and linguistic difference; linguistic diversity and the teaching of English language and literature; and problems of language and public policy. The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) they speak. 

Texts: Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence Erlbaum, 2nd ed., 2007; Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom, New Press, 2002; Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 1997; Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?: Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College Press, 2001; a course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall).

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (three; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 8-10 pages, in two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are calculated as follows: 15% of the grade is based on quizzes, problems, and ungraded writing assignments; 45% on exams (15% for each of three); 30% on the final paper; and 10% on class preparation and informed discussion. Regular attendance is considered essential, and unsatisfactory attendance marks are deducted from the final average.

E 360K • English Grammar

35655 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am GAR 3.116
show description

E 360K and LIN 360K may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: English Grammar examines the syntax or structure of present-day English. Its major aim is to encourage students to think about the English language and English grammar in a new way.

The term “grammar” describes both the linguistic knowledge that speakers of English share (an internalized or mental “grammar”) and any representation of linguistic conventions (a “grammar” or model of English). Thus one course aim is to make explicit the syntactic conventions speakers of English know unconsciously (Why do you interpret “Igor ran up a hill” differently than “Igor ran up a bill”?). A second course goal is to study ways of modeling language structure (How should we describe the linguistic conventions you just applied?). We will use traditional terminology as we investigate English syntax for some of the course, but we will also draw on the methods of generative grammar, especially as we consider alternative explanations for language structure and for linguistic knowledge. A final course aim is to consider English syntax in context.  So we will also briefly discuss syntactic variation in American English (regional and class differences in speech), attitudes toward language variation, and controversies involving English usage.

Texts: Martha Kolln and Robert Funk, Understanding English Grammar, Allyn and Bacon, 8th ed., 2009. Course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall or on-line through electronic reserves).

Grading: In order to pass this course, you must: 1) work consistently (if not always accurately) on weekly exercises; 2) earn a passing average score on quizzes; 3) complete all exams with a passing average score (no exam may be missed); 4) demonstrate familiarity with required readings; and 5) attend class regularly. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Course grades are calculated in two ways; the instructor counts the highest calculation as the student's final course average. Calculation #1: 25% of the grade based on quizzes, 25% on each of three exams. Calculation #2: 33% of the grade based on each exam. The purpose of the double-calculation system is to ensure that students can use quizzes as genuine learning opportunities. That is, you can use quizzes to improve your grade, but if you've been temporarily confused about something on a quiz you won't be penalized for that in your final average.

Class final course averages are then curved and assigned letter grades. Discussion and attendance are considered essential; thus, this letter grade may then be adjusted up or down (often one-half grade), depending on the student's attendance, class participation, and performance on collected but ungraded assignments. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction. Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35715 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 1.134
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Only one of the following may be counted: E 364T, 376L (Topic: The English Language and Its Social Context), 376L (Topic: The English Language in Its Social Context).

Course Description:  The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses.  The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric.  Specifically, we will study:  basic principles of language structure and change; social dimensions of language variety; linguistic diversity in the U.S.; English and commercial culture; language attitudes; pedagogical issues involving language acquisition and linguistic difference; linguistic diversity and the teaching of English language and literature; and problems of language and public policy.  The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) they speak.

Texts:  Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence Erlbaum, 2nd ed., 2007; Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language
and Culture in the Classroom
, New Press, 2002; Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 1997; Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?: Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College Press, 2001; a course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall).

Grading:  Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (three; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 8-10 pages, in two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance.  Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are calculated as follows:  15% of the grade is based on quizzes, problems, and ungraded writing assignments; 45% on exams (15% for each of three); 30% on the final paper; and 10% on class preparation and informed discussion.  Regular attendance is considered essential, and unsatisfactory attendance marks are deducted from the final average.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 360K • English Grammar

34730 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 130
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E 360K and LIN 360K may not both be counted.

Course Description: English Grammar examines the syntax or structure of present-day English. Its major aim is to encourage students to think about the English language and English grammar in a new way.

The term “grammar” describes both the linguistic knowledge that speakers of English share (an internalized or mental “grammar”) and any representation of linguistic conventions (a “grammar” or model of English). Thus one course aim is to make explicit the syntactic conventions speakers of English know unconsciously (Why do you interpret “Igor ran up a hill” differently than “Igor ran up a bill”?). A second course goal is to study ways of modeling language structure (How should we describe the linguistic conventions you just applied?). We will use traditional terminology as we investigate English syntax for some of the course, but we will also draw on the methods of generative grammar, especially as we consider alternative explanations for language structure and for linguistic knowledge. A final course aim is to consider English syntax in context.  So we will also briefly discuss syntactic variation in American English (regional and class differences in speech), attitudes toward language variation, and controversies involving English usage.

Texts: Martha Kolln and Robert Funk, Understanding English Grammar, Allyn and Bacon, 8th ed., 2009. Course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall or on-line through electronic reserves).

Grading: In order to pass this course, you must: 1) work consistently (if not always accurately) on weekly exercises; 2) earn a passing average score on quizzes; 3) complete all exams with a passing average score (no exam may be missed); 4) demonstrate familiarity with required readings; and 5) attend class regularly. Note that these are minimum requirements.  Course grades are calculated in two ways; the instructor counts the highest calculation as the student's final course average. Calculation #1: 25% of the grade based on quizzes, 25% on each of three exams. Calculation #2: 33% of the grade based on each exam. The purpose of the double-calculation system is to ensure that students can use quizzes as genuine learning opportunities. That is, you can use quizzes to improve your grade, but if you've been temporarily confused about something on a quiz you won't be penalized for that in your final average. Class final course averages are then curved and assigned letter grades. Discussion and attendance are considered essential; thus, this letter grade may then be adjusted up or down (often one-half grade), depending on the student's attendance, class participation, and performance on collected but ungraded assignments. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades. A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction. Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

34810 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 304
show description

Only one of the following may be counted: E 364T, 376L (Topic: The English Language and Its Social Context), 376L (Topic: The English Language in Its Social Context).

Course Description:  The English Language and Its Social Context is a course designed for English majors, future teachers of English and rhetoric, and other language-oriented students who want to know more about the English language, especially about its social meanings and political uses.  The course aims to acquaint students with the language theory, history, and research most relevant to teachers of literature and rhetoric.  Specifically, we will study:  basic principles of language structure and change; social dimensions of language variety; linguistic diversity in the U.S.; English and commercial culture; language attitudes; pedagogical issues involving language acquisition and linguistic difference; linguistic diversity and the teaching of English language and literature; and problems of language and public policy.  The course aims not solely to convey information, though of course this will be important, but to encourage students to think in new ways about the language(s) they speak.

Texts:  Adger, Carolyn Temple, Walt Wolfram, and Donna Christian, Dialects in Schools and Communities, Lawrence Erlbaum, 2nd ed., 2007; Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom, New Press, 2002; Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 1997; Tse, Lucy, Why Don't They Learn English?: Separating Fact From Fallacy in the U. S. Language Debate, Teacher's College Press, 2001; a course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall).

Grading:  Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on (possible) quizzes and on linguistics problems; 2) satisfactory work on four minor written assignments (2-3 pages each); 3) a passing average score on exams (three; no exam may be missed); 4) a satisfactory final paper (approximately 6-8 pages, in two drafts); 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance.  Note that these are minimum requirements. Grades are calculated as follows:  15% of the grade is based on quizzes, problems, and ungraded writing assignments; 45% on exams (15% for each of three); 30% on the final paper; and 10% on class preparation and informed discussion.  Regular attendance is considered essential, and unsatisfactory attendance marks are deducted from the final average.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 360K • English Grammar

34890 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 GAR 3.116
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E360K: English Grammar

Instructor: Professor Henkel
Spring, 2010 / Unique #34890
  E360K, English Grammar   Dr. Jacqueline Henkel
  Spring 2010, #34890 & #34895   Office: Parlin 14; 471-4942
  GAR 3.116, TTh, 8:00-9:30 & 9:30-11:00   Hours: TTh, 11:30-1:00
  utexas.edu/courses/henkel/E360K   henkelj@uts.cc.utexas.edu

Course Description

English Grammar examines the syntax or structure of present-day English. Its major aim is to encourage students to think about the English language and English grammar in a new way. The term "grammar" describes both the linguistic knowledge that speakers of English share (an internalized or mental "grammar") and any representation of linguistic conventions (a "grammar" or model of English). Thus one course aim is to make explicit the syntactic conventions speakers of English know unconsciously (Why do you interpret "Igor ran up a hill" differently than "Igor ran up a bill"?). A second course goal is to study ways of modeling language structure (How should we describe the linguistic conventions you just applied?). We will use traditional terminology as we investigate English syntax for some of the course, but we will also draw on the methods of generative grammar, especially as we consider alternative explanations for language structure and for linguistic knowledge. A final course aim is to consider English syntax in context. So we will also briefly discuss syntactic variation in American English (regional and class differences in speech), attitudes toward language variation (why speakers correct each other), and controversies involving English usage.

Course Requirements

In order to pass this course, you must:

  1. work consistently (if not always accurately) on weekly exercises;
  2. earn a passing average score on quizzes;
  3. complete all exams with a passing average score (no exam may be missed);
  4. demonstrate familiarity with required readings;
  5. attend class regularly.

Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grading Policy

Course grades are calculated in two ways; the instructor counts the highest calculation as the student's final course average.

Calculation #1:

  • 25% of the grade based on quizzes
  • 25% on each of three exams

Calculation #2:

  • 33% of the grade based on each exam

The purpose of the double-calculation system is to ensure that students can use quizzes as genuine learning opportunities. That is, you can use quizzes to improve your grade, but if you've been temporarily confused about something on a quiz you won't be penalized for that in your final average.

Class final course averages are then curved and assigned letter grades. Discussion and attendance are considered essential; thus, this letter grade may then be adjusted up or down (often one-half grade), depending on the student's attendance, class participation, and performance on collected but ungraded assignments. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction. Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

Texts

Required:

  • Martha Kolln and Robert Funk, Understanding English Grammar, Allyn and Bacon, 7th ed., 2001.
  • Course packet (available at Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall or on-line through electronic reserves).

Recommended:

  • David Crystal, The Fight for English: How Language Pundits Ate, Shot, and Left, Oxford UP, 2006.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35174 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 206
show description

TBD

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