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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Neville Hoad

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1998, Columbia University

Neville Hoad

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Biography

Neville Hoad is an associate professor of English and affiliated faculty with the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, the Center for African and African American Studies, and the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice. He authored African Intimacies: Race, Homosexuality and Globalization(Minnesota, 2007) and co-edits (with Karen Martin and Graeme Reid) Sex & Politics in South Africa (Double Storey, 2005). He is writing a book on the literary and cultural representations of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Sub-Saharan Africa. Areas of research include African and Victorian literature, queer theory, and the history of sexuality.


Additional department affiliations: Asian-American Studies, the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, the Center for African and African American Studies, and the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice.

Interests

Victorian feminism; psychoanalysis (particularly Freud and Klein); contemporary feminist theory in French and English; lesbian and gay studies; queer theory; international human rights law pertaining to sexual orientations; sexuality and gender issues in Southern Africa.

E 603A • Composition/Reading World Lit

34995 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CRD 007A
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Description: Since the world is big and literature is long, the course is organized around thematic concerns—cosmology, collecting, travel, identity, diaspora—rather than claiming a representative sample of the literature of the world. Primarily, we will ponder the problem of worldliness in a variety of literary texts from diverging genres, places, and time periods, evaluating how writers have taken up the problem of representing the world from specifically local positions.

Texts/Readings:

Fall                                                                                        

Ovid, Metamorphosis                                                               

The Arabian Nights, (Trans. Haddawy)                                       

Chestnutt, The Conjure Woman                                                

Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray                                              

Eliot, The Wasteland                                                                

Packet of supplementary critical materials                                 

Packet of supplementary critical materials

Spring                                    

Columbus, Three Voyages

Shakespeare, The Tempest

Melville, Typee

Conrad, Heart of Darkness

Gide, The Immoralist

 

Kincaid, Lucy

Assignments:

Although there will be occasional lectures, usually we will discuss as a group certain questions related to the assigned reading. Come to class prepared to participate in discussions. No midterms or final exams will be given, but expect to write four or five essays (4-5 pages each) each term, plus occasional quizzes or brief (one-page) papers in class. No late papers will be accepted. Attendance is presumed—no one absent more than five classes in a semester will receive a passing grade. Grades will depend largely on the writing assignments, with each major paper counting one-fourth or one-fifth (depending on whether there are four or five papers) of the final grade. Class participation will be taken into account and can affect your final grade by as much as a full letter (in extreme cases).

About the Professor:

Neville Hoad was born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa. He holds a Ph.D. in English Literature from Columbia University. His areas of research include Victorian literature and culture, contemporary African literature, gender and sexuality studies, and postcolonial theory.  In 2013-2014, Professor Hoad received the Chad Oliver Award for Teaching Excellence in Plan II.

E 397N • Sexualities In Translation

36145 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 500pm-630pm CAL 419
(also listed as WGS 393 )
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In this course, students would read a number of contemporary novels and films that mess with the ways increasingly globally hegemonic discourses translate human erotic intimacy into the sexuality of the homo/hetero identity binary. Drawn from diverse national contexts in multiple languages, much of what we read (and watch) will be in translation or subtitled. I hope that we will learn to think about sexuality itself as a translation or recoding of bodies, practices, pleasures and economic exchanges. We will also ponder the global politics of language in relation to questions of sexuality. Why does Deepa Mahta make Fire in English? Why is Sevaldurai’s Funny Boy written in English? Has the emergence of a lesbian and gay cultural public sphere in the Anglophone world facilitated the translation and global distribution of cultural products that are legible as gay or lesbian to an international audience? Does this mis/recognition give them an edge over other local products in a globalizing cultural market-place? Do these works imagine the lineaments of a transnational lesbian and gay subject, anticipating their translation or do they remain in certain ways stubbornly local? How has sexuality become a vector for the working out of the relationship between diasporic and home and host national communities? Fiction could include Barakat’s The Stone of Laughter (Lebanon), Al Shaykh’s Women of Sand and Myrrh (Kuwait), Sevaldurai’s Funny Boy (Sri Lanka/Canada), Rao’s One Day I locked my flat in Soul City (India), Puig’s Kiss of the Spiderwoman (Argentina), Blu’s Hanging (Hawaii) and Gray’s Time of Our Darkness (South Africa), Jude Dibia’s Walking with Shadows (Nigeria). Films could include My Beautiful Laundrette (U.K.), Dakan (Guinea), Woubi Cheri (Ivory Coast), Heavenly Creatures (New Zealand), Law of Desire (Spain), Dangerous Living (U.S), The Man who drove with Mandela (South Africa), Apostles of Civilized Vice (South African television series), Uncut  and /or Zero Patience (Canada), The Wedding Banquet (U.S.),  Fire (India) and episodes from the television series Queer as Folk (both the British and U.S. versions.)

E 397M • Homoerotics Of Empire

36360 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 100pm-230pm CAL 323
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This course will investigate literary and cultural representations of erotically charged relations between men (sublimated and not) in the historical experience of the British Empire, through careful attention to the interarticulation of homosexual, homosocial, and homoerotic forms of intimacy. The 1886 Labouchere Amendment criminalizes acts of gross indecency between men. The 1884-85 Berlin Conference divides the African continent into territories ruled by the European powers. This course aspires to examine this coincidence.

Texts might include:

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

E.M. Forster, The Hill of Devi

Edward Carpenter, Intermediate Types Among Primitive Folk

H. Ryder Haggard, King Solomon's Mines

Roger Casement, The Black Diaries

Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

Sigmund Freud, Totem and Taboo

T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom

H.G. Wells, The Time Machine

The Island of Dr. Moreau

Richard Burton, “The Sotadic Zone”

Andre Gide, The Immoralist

 

E 349S • Oscar Wilde

35850 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Hoad, N            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35850            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: In this class we will read almost all of the published oeuvre of the Anglo-Irish writer, Oscar Wilde: all his plays, critical essays and children’s stories, The Picture of Dorian Gray, selected journalism and letters. We will also take advantage of the Oscar Wilde holdings at the Harry Ransom Center. We will also read Richard Ellmann’s definitive biography of Wilde. The course will contextualize Wilde’s life and work in terms of British aestheticism, Irish nationalism, the relationship between celebrity and the emergence of mass-culture and the place of Wilde in the imagining of modern homosexual identity.

Texts: Oscar Wilde, Complete Works; Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde; The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde (Eds. Holland and Hart-Davis); Reading packet

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and class participation are mandatory. More than 2 unexcused absences will result in grade penalties.

2 short response papers, 4 pages each: 20%; 1 in-class presentation and participation in class discussion: 30%; Final research paper, 12-15 pages: 50%

E F349S • Oscar Wilde

83555 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am SAC 5.102
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Instructor:  Hoad, N            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  83555            Flags:  n/a  [no writing flag in summer]

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: In this class we will read almost all of the published oeuvre of the Anglo-Irish writer, Oscar Wilde: all his plays, critical essays and children’s stories, The Picture of Dorian Gray, selected journalism and letters. We will also take advantage of the Oscar Wilde holdings at the Harry Ransom Center. We will also read Richard Ellmann’s definitive biography of Wilde. The course will contextualize Wilde’s life and work in terms of British aestheticism, Irish nationalism, the relationship between celebrity and the emergence of mass-culture and the place of Wilde in the imagining of modern homosexual identity.

Texts: Oscar Wilde, Complete Works; Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde; The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde (Eds. Holland and Hart-Davis); Reading packet

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and class participation are mandatory. More than 2 unexcused absences will result in grade penalties.

2 short response papers, 4 pages each: 20%; 1 in-class presentation and participation in class discussion: 30%; Final research paper, 12-15 pages: 50%

E 397N • Colonialism And Psychoanalysis

35890 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 214
(also listed as C L 382 )
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Colonialism And Psychoanalysis

In this course, we will track the emergence of psychoanalysis in the context of the intellectual production of an Imperial nineteenth-century Europe, its deployment by key anti-colonial thinkers like Fanon to recent scholarly attempts to re-think the relationships between psychoanalysis and colonialism as historical contingency, complicity, political critique and more.

Readings may include:

  • Sigmund Freud: “Mourning and Melancholy,” “The Uncanny,” Beyond the Pleasure Principle, Totem and Taboo, The Ego and the Id, “Group Psychology and the Analysis of the ego.”
  • Melanie Klein: “Love, Guilt  and Reparation”
  • Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Masks and The Wretched of the Earth  
  • Assia Djebar: Women of Algiers in their Apartment
  • Kaja Silverman: Male Subjectivity at the Margins
  • Ranjana Khanna: Dark Continents: Psychoanalysis and Colonialism
  • Wulf Sachs: Black Hamlet
  • Albert Memmi: The Colonizer and the Colonized
  • Chandra Chatterjee: Surviving Colonialism
  • Ashis Nandy:  The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of Self Under Colonialism
  • Helene Cixous. “The Laugh of the Medusa”
  • Gayatri Spivak. “French Feminisms in an International Frame.”
  • Homi Bhabha. “Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalence of Colonial Discourse

E 360S • Literature Of Aids In Africa

35555 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 103
(also listed as AFR 372G )
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Instructor:  Hoad, N            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35555            Flags:  Global cultures, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372G            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: AFR 374C (Topic: Literature of African AIDS), E 360S (Topic 2), 376L (Topic: Literature of African AIDS).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will read, watch and discuss emerging cultural representations of the current AIDS pandemic affecting sub-Saharan Africa alongside journalistic, social-science and historical accounts. Many genres will be covered including novels, films, and poems, in order to work through their respective strengths and weaknesses in the difficulty of representing the various aspects of a public-health crisis of overwhelming proportions.

Texts (available at the Co-op): John Le Carre, The Constant Gardener; Phaswane Mpe, Welcome to our Hillbrow; Carolyn Adalla, Confessions of an AIDS Victim; Paul Farmer, Pathologies of Power; Stephanie Nolen, 28 Stories of AIDS in Africa; Jonny Steinberg, Sizwe’s Test; Meja Mwangi, The Last Plague; Mark Hunter, Love in the Times of AIDS; Ruth Whitney, Slim; *Course Packet of supplementary materials.

Films to be screened: Yesterday; Fig Trees; State of Denial; The Constant Gardener.

Requirements & Grading: The class will be run as a seminar. Attendance is mandatory. More than one unexcused absence will result in a grade penalty.

Class participation including one presentation will comprise 30% of your grade, two Response Papers of 2-3 pages (10% each) and 1 Final Paper of 8-10 pages (making up the remaining 50%).

E 397N • Sexualities In Translation

35715 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.114
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Sexualities In Translation

Using several recent novels and films we will explore the utility of the intersection of queer and postcolonial theory in understanding representations globalizing sexuality.

 

E F349S • Oscar Wilde

83595 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 105
show description

E 349S (Topic 7) and 379N (Topic: Oscar Wilde) may not both be counted.

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Course Description: In this class we will read almost all of the published oeuvre of the Anglo-Irish writer, Oscar Wilde: all his plays, critical essays and children’s stories, The Picture of Dorian Gray, selected journalism and letters. We will also take advantage of the Oscar Wilde holdings at the Harry Ransom Center. We will also read Richard Ellmann’s definitive biography of Wilde. The course will contextualize Wilde’s life and work in terms of British aestheticism, Irish nationalism, the relationship between celebrity and the emergence of mass-culture and the place of Wilde in the imagining of modern homosexual identity. 

 

Texts: Oscar Wilde, Complete Works; Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde; The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde (Eds. Holland and Hart-Davis); Reading packet

 

Grading: Attendance and class participation are mandatory. More than 2 unexcused absences will result in grade penalties.

 

2 short response papers, 4 pages each: 20%; 1 in-class presentation and participation in class discussion: 30%; Final research paper, 12-15 pages: 50%

E 349S • Oscar Wilde

35600 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 103
show description

E 349S (Topic 7) and 379N (Topic: Oscar Wilde) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: In this class we will read almost all of the published oeuvre of the Anglo-Irish writer, Oscar Wilde: all his plays, critical essays and children’s stories, The Picture of Dorian Gray, selected journalism and letters. We will also take advantage of the Oscar Wilde holdings at the Harry Ransom Center. We will also read Richard Ellmann’s definitive biography of Wilde. The course will contextualize Wilde’s life and work in terms of British aestheticism, Irish nationalism, the relationship between celebrity and the emergence of mass-culture and the place of Wilde in the imagining of modern homosexual identity.

Texts: Oscar Wilde, Complete Works; Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde; The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde (Eds. Holland and Hart-Davis); Reading packet

Grading: Attendance and class participation are mandatory. More than 2 unexcused absences will result in grade penalties.

2 short response papers, 4 pages each: 20%; 1 in-class presentation and participation in class discussion: 30%; Final research paper, 12-15 pages: 50%

E 392M • Victorian Sex

35075 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.104
show description

Freud thought the Victorians were repressed about sex. Foucault thought that they were obsessed with it. Between the coinage of the term “Homosexuality” in 1869, the emergence of “New Woman” debates in the last decades of the nineteenth century, the competing stereotypes of “fallen woman” and “the angel in the house,” and the invention of sexology, Victorian writers, in a range of genres, had to engage “sex” in its full plenitude of contradictory meanings.

Primary texts might include

Hardy: Jude the Obscure; Rosetti: Goblin Market; Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Anonymous: Teleny or the Reverse of the Medal; Schreiner: Story of an African Farm; Engels: The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (exceprts); Bulwer-Lytton: The Coming Race; Burton (trans) Kama Sutra and Arabian Nights (excerpts), Eliot: Adam Bede, Von Krafft-Ebing: Psychopathia Sexualis (excerpts) among others

Secondary readings from Foucault, Marcus, Poovey, Lane, Walkowitz, Bland, Doan
 

E 379N • Oscar Wilde

83150 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm PAR 206
show description

Course Description: In this class we will read almost all of the published oeuvre of the Anglo-Irish writer, Oscar Wilde: all his plays, critical essays and children’s stories, The Picture of Dorian Gray, selected journalism and letters. We will also take advantage of the Oscar Wilde holdings at the Harry Ransom Center. We will also read Richard Ellmann’s definitive biography of Wilde. The course will contextualize Wilde’s life and work in terms of British aestheticism, Irish nationalism, the relationship between celebrity and the emergence of mass-culture and the place of Wilde in the imagining of modern homosexual identity.

Texts: Oscar Wilde, Complete Works; Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde; The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde (Eds. Holland and Hart-Davis); Reading packet.

Grading: Attendance and class participation are mandatory. More than 2 unexcused absences will result in grade penalties. 1 short response papers, 4 pages: 20%; 1 in-class presentation and participation in class discussion: 30%; Final exam: 50%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 379N • Oscar Wilde-Honors-W

35100 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 PAR 210
show description

E379N: Oscar Wilde (35100)

Neville Hoad
Parlin 215
Office Hours: TTH11-1
Spring 2010

In this class we will read almost all of the published oeuvre of the Anglo-Irish writer, Oscar Wilde: all his plays, critical essays and children’s stories, The Picture of Dorian Gray, selected journalism and letters. We will also take advantage of the Oscar Wilde holdings at the Harry Ransom Center. We will also read Richard Ellmann’s definitive biography of Wilde. The course will contextualize Wilde’s life and work in terms of British aestheticism, Irish nationalism, the relationship between celebrity and the emergence of mass- culture and the place of Wilde in the imagining of modern homosexual identity.

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation are mandatory. More than 2 unexcused absences will result in grade penalties.

2 short response papers: 4 pages each 20%
1 in-class presentation and participation in class discussion 30%
Final research paper 12-15 pages 50%

Drafts of the final research paper will be extensively workshopped in class.

Texts

  • Oscar Wilde, Complete Works
  • Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde
  • Reading packet*

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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