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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

John P Farrell

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., 1967, Indiana University

John P Farrell

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Biography

John Farrell is a Professor Emeritus in the English Department. He received his Ph.D., from Indiana University in 1967 and went on to teach at the University of Kansas until 1974, when he joined the English Department faculty of UT Austin.  His many honors and awards include several Faculty Research Assignment grants, the American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship, and the Outstanding Teaching Award from the College of Humanities.

Interests

Victorian literature; romantic literature; history of social though from Rousseau to the present; contemporary American poetry; contemporary Irish literature.

E 379N • Ghosts Of The Gothic

83327 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAR 103
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Course Description: The genre of gothic literature developed in the late eighteenth century and flourished in the Romantic era.  A reaction set in during the Victorian period against the extravagant style and world of mystery featured in gothic literature. Victorian writers in general sought what they considered a more realistic representation of human experience, one that was grounded in the norms of everyday life, rational thought, and contained passion. And yet the darker experiences and mysterious illuminations that dominated gothicism proved too compelling as possibilities even for the presumably anti-gothic art of the Victorians. As a result many Victorian writers, while supposedly subscribing to realism, remained tempted by the portraits of inner human life that gothicism had explored.  In effect, Victorian realism was haunted by ghosts of the gothic tradition. The course will study this haunting as it influences and shapes three major novels of the Victorian period: Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and Tess of the D’Urbervilles as well as Henry James’ novella, The Turn of the Screw.

Texts:

  • Charlotte Brontë:  Jane Eyre (Norton Critical Editions), ed. R.J. Dunn
  • Emily Brontë: Wuthering Heights (Norton Critical Editions), ed. R. J. Dunn
  • Thomas Hardy: Tess of the d'Urbervilles (World's Classics 1988), eds. J. Grindle, and S. Gatrell
  • James: The Turn of the Screw (Dover)

You can use other editions if you want as long as you can figure out in class what page we’re on.

 Grading: Your grade will be based on three short papers (3-4pp each) that will be assigned during the course + 20% for class participation. The papers will focus on questions about how to read particular passages in the texts. In addition: no one who does not attend and contribute regularly can end up with the grade of A in this course.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

For more information, please download the full course syllabus.

E 379N • Ghosts Of The Gothic

35086 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 500pm-630pm BEN 1.126
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Descriptive Syllabus: E 379N GHOSTS OF THE GOTHIC  (35086 )    Spring, 2010

Professor John P. Farrell                                                Parlin Hall, Hrs MW 3:30-5.pm

Overview
  The genre of gothic literature developed in the late eighteenth century and flourished in the Romantic era.  A reaction set in during the Victorian period against the extravagant style and world of mystery featured in gothic literature.  Victorian writers in general sought what they considered a more realistic representation of human experience, one that was grounded in the norms of everyday life, rational thought, and contained passion.  And yet the darker experiences and mysterious illuminations that dominated gothicism proved too compelling as possibilities even for the presumably anti-gothic art of the Victorians.  As a result many Victorian writers, while supposedly subscribing to realism, remained tempted by the portraits of inner human life that gothicism had explored.  In effect, Victorian realism was haunted by ghosts of the gothic tradition.  The course will study this haunting as it influences and shapes five major fictions of the Victorian period:  Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights, Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and The Turn of the Screw.

Prerequisite: You must have completed E316K or equivalent.

Lectures 
  Discussions and lectures will occur on each of the dates listed in the syllabus. In all cases we will be concerned with the literary history that is relevant to each of texts.  We will also look at biographical information concerning the various authors. Primary focus will be on detailed literary analysis of the form and content of each work, and especially on the relation of form and content to one another.  The goal here is to broaden your understanding of how a literary text works, what aesthetic principles shape its substance, and how the reader comes to critical judgment on, and evaluation of, a literary text. In every class the center of gravity will be located in these fundamental questions: how is this text to be read? what does reading a literary text mean? how does this particular text equip its reader to read it?  what makes a literary work literature and not something else?

Books Required

Mary Shelley: Frankenstein   (World’s Classics)
Emily Brontë: Wuthering Heights (Norton Critical Editions), ed. R. J. Dunn
Thomas Hardy: Tess of the d'Urbervilles (World's Classics 1988), 
eds. J. Grindle, and S. Gatrell
R. L. Stevenson: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: & Other Tales of Terror (Penguin)
Henry James: The Turn of the Screw (Dover Thrift Editions)

Many of these texts can be found, sometimes in older editions, as used books either at the  bookstore or on Amazon.  The important thing is that you get the version put out by the publisher as specified above.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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