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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Jeffrey Walker

Professor Ph.D., 1985, University of California, Berkeley

Professor & Chair, Department of Rhetoric & Writing
Jeffrey Walker

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Biography

Professor Jeffrey Walker studies classical and modern rhetorical theory; the history of rhetoric; the relationship between rhetoric and poetics from antiquity to modernity; and rhetorical pedagogy and the teaching of writing. His most recent work (as of 2009) has focused on rhetorical teaching and practice in Byzantium between the tenth and fifteenth centuries, and rhetorical education in antiquity. Professor Walker has been a Fulbright Lecturer (Greece, 1992) and an NEH Fellow (2007-08). His publications include two books, a textbook, and numerous articles and chapters. (As of this writing another book and textbook are forthcoming.)

 

Interests

Rhetorical theory, history of rhetoric, ancient rhetoric, rhetoric and poetics, modern rhetoric and literature

E 387R • Clascl Rhet Through Centuries

36090 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 100pm-230pm PAR 310
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This course will examine the classical rhetorical tradition, with an eye to its contemporary uses. The first half of the course will focus on classical (ancient) rhetoric per se, while the second half will rapidly overview (some of) its post-classical iterations and modifications — e.g., in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modernist eras — depending in part on student interests and projects. Within the general overview, possible foci will include: relations between rhetoric and poetics; rhetoric and technology (orality/literacy, etc.); the rhetorical paideia (rhetorical pedagogy and the liberal arts); rhetoric, politics, and practical wisdom (phronêsis); rhetoric, philosophy, and the “regime of Truth”; rhetoric and/as critical hermeneutics.

Primary readings in classical rhetoric are likely to include: the fragments of the early sophists; Isocrates; Plato (Gorgias, Phaedrus, Protagoras, Ion); Aristotle (Rhetoric, Poetics); Cicero (De Oratore); Quintilian; Dionysius of Halicarnassus; Hermogenes; Longinus On the Sublime; Augustine (De Doctrina Christiana); and rhetorical “handbooks” (technai; artes). Readings from later periods may include selections and extracts from Medieval and Renaisssance artes, Erasmus (De Copia), Sidney (Apology for Poetry); Neoclassical and Romantic “lectures on rhetoric and belles lettres”; Nietszche; and such modernist figures as I.A. Richards, Kenneth Burke,  and Chaim Perelman. Recommended secondary readings will include general histories of rhetoric and rhetorical education (e.g., Kennedy, Conley, Bizzell/Herzberg), as well as studies of particular periods and/or figures (e.g., Schiappa, Pernot, Marrou, Cribiore, Murphy, Lanham, Sloane); an extended bibliography will be provided.

Requirements probably will include: several brief oral presentations (discussion openers, reports); a conference-paper-length oral presentation on the student’s chosen research/writing project; and an expanded (up to article-length) seminar paper on that project.

E 387R • Clascl Rhet Through Centuries

35605 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm PAR 310
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E387R: CLASSICAL RHETORIC (THROUGH THE CENTURIES)

Particular topics may vary, but in general this course will examine the classical rhetorical tradition with an eye to its contemporary uses. The first half of the course will focus on classical (ancient) rhetoric per se, while the second half will rapidly overview (some of) its post-classical iterations and modifications — e.g., in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modernist eras — depending in part on student interests and projects. Within the general overview, possible foci will include: relations between rhetoric and poetics; rhetoric and technology (orality/literacy, etc.); the rhetorical paideia (rhetorical pedagogy and the liberal arts); rhetoric, politics, and practical wisdom (phronêsis); rhetoric, philosophy, and the “regime of Truth”; rhetoric and/as critical hermeneutics.

Primary readings in classical rhetoric are likely to include: the fragments of the early sophists; Isocrates; Plato (Gorgias, Phaedrus, Protagoras, Ion); Aristotle (Rhetoric, Poetics); Cicero (De Oratore); Quintilian; Dionysius of Halicarnassus; Hermogenes; Longinus On the Sublime; Augustine (De Doctrina Christiana); and rhetorical “handbooks” (technai; artes). Readings from later periods may include selections and extracts from Medieval and Renaisssance artes, Erasmus (De Copia), Sidney (Apology for Poetry); Neoclassical and Romantic “lectures on rhetoric and belles lettres”; Nietszche; and such modernist figures as I.A. Richards, Kenneth Burke,  Chaim Perelman, and Wayne Booth. Recommended secondary readings will include general histories of rhetoric and rhetorical education (e.g., Kennedy, Conley, Bizzell/Herzberg), as well as studies of particular periods and/or figures (e.g., Schiappa, Pernot, Marrou, Cribiore, Murphy, Lanham, Sloane); an extended bibliography will be provided.

Requirements will include: several brief oral presentations (discussion openers, reports); a conference-paper-length oral presentation on the student’s chosen research/writing project; and an expanded (up to article-length) seminar paper on that project.

E 387R • Rhet & Poetics, Ancient & Mod

35220 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 1100-1230pm JES A215A
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See attachment.

Publications

Walker, J. (2011) The Genuine Teachers of this Art: Rhetorical Education in Antiquity. University of South Carolina Press, forthcoming.

Longaker, M., & Walker, J. (2010) Rhetorical Analysis. Pearson-Longman, forthcoming.

Walker, J. (2008) Rhetoric and Poetics. International Encyclopedia of Communication, vol. 9, 4310-4312.

Walker, J. (2006) The Place of Theory in Ancient Rhetoric. In L. Montefusco (Ed.), Papers on Rhetoric VII (pp.247-265). Rome: Herder.

Walker, J. (2005) Michael Psellos: The Encomium of His Mother. Advances in the History of Rhetoric 8, 239-313.

Walker, J. (2005) Mime, Comedy, Sophistry: Speculations on the Origins of Rhetoric. Advances in the History of Rhetoric, 8, 199-210.

Walker, J. (2005) Aelius Aristides. In M. Balliff & M. Moran (Eds.), Classical Rhetorics and Rhetoricians. New York: Praeger.

Walker, J. (2005) Dionysius of Halicarnassus. In M. Balliff & M. Moran (Eds.), Classical Rhetorics and Rhetoricians (pp.137-141). New York: Praeger.

Walker, J. (2004) These Things I Have Not Betrayed: Michael Psellos' Encomium of His Mother. Rhetorica, 22(1), 49-101.

Walker, J. (2000) Rhetoric and Poetics in Antiquity. New York: Oxford University Press.

Walker, J. (2000) Pathos and Katharsis in "Aristotelian" Rhetoric . In A. Gross & A. Walzer (Eds.), Rereading Aristotle (pp.74-92). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Walker, J. (1994) The Body of Persuasion: A Theory of the Enthymeme. College English, 56(1), 46-65.

Walker, J. (1992, September) Enthymemes of Anger in Cicero and Thomas Paine. Southern Illinois University Press, 357-381.

Walker, J. (1991) Investigating Arguments: Readings for College Writing. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Walker, J. (1989) Bardic Ethos and the American Epic Poem: Whitman, Pound, Crane, Williams, Olson. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.

Walker, J. (1989) Aristotle's Lyric: Re-Imagining the Rhetoric of Epideictic Song. College English, 51(1), 5-28.

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