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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Sara E Kimball

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1983, University of Pennsylvania

Contact

Biography


Additional department affiliations: Middle Eastern Studies, Linguistics

Interests

Hittitology; Hittite and Indo-European languages; historical linguistics; lexicography; language and gender; history of literacy.

E 321L • American English

35690 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 321L )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S

Unique #:  35690 and 35695

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 321L

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Requirements & Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%).

E 321L • American English

35695 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 321L )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S

Unique #:  35690 and 35695

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 321L

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Requirements & Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%).

E 364T • Eng Lang & Its Social Context

35910 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.118
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S

Unique #:  35910

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Independent Inquiry; Writing

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Goals: The English Language and Its Social Context is for future teachers of English and writing and others who want to know more about the structure and sociolinguistics of American English.  The course aims to acquaint students with the linguistic theory and research most relevant to teachers of literature and writing.  We will look at the structures and histories of standard English and non-standard varieties, linguistic variation, and at the attitudes of teachers and the public toward non-standard varieties and how these attitudes affect student outcomes.

Required Texts include: • Delpit, Lisa, and Joanne Kilgour Dowdy, The Skin That We Speak: Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom, New Press, 2nd ed., 2008 • Lippi-Green, Rosina, English with an Accent: Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, Routledge, 2nd ed., 2011 • Readings packet available at Jenn’s.

Requirements & Grading: • Two short position papers (3-5 pages with drafts) 20% each • Research project (8-10 pages with final presentation) 35% • Response journal 15% • Short in-class writing assignments, quizzes, short observation assignments etc. 10%.

E 321L • American English

35840 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 321L )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S

Unique #:  35840 and 35845

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 321

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Requirements & Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%).

E 321L • American English

35845 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 321L )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S

Unique #:  35840 and 35845

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 321

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Requirements & Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%).

E 379R • Lexicography

36235 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S

Unique #:  36235

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

E 379R (Topic: Lexicography) and 379S (embedded topic: Lexicography) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Did you know that the first English dictionary, A Table of Alphabeticall of Hard Usual English Words, was published by Robert Cawdrey in 1604? Although later dictionary editors were less enthusiastic about doubling letters than Cawdrey was, the history of dictionary making has been a complex—and sometimes controversial—process involving attempts to provide guidance to the general public about standard, word meanings, etymology, and usage. After a short overview of the history of English dictionaries, which have evolved from short glossaries of “hard words” (technical terms and difficult vocabulary items) to works that attempt to capture most of the vocabulary of English, we will look in detail at how dictionaries are constructed. Topics we will cover include how words are defined, how etymologies (or word histories) are constructed, and how dictionary editors attempt to meet the needs of various audiences, including children, non-native speakers of English, and English-speaking adults, while simultaneously trying to construct dictionaries as records of the English language as it is used. We will also look at how dictionaries are related to other reference works, such as encyclopedias, and at how dictionaries are changing in the rapidly evolving world of computer technology. I hope to provide a guest speaker who can talk about career opportunities in lexicography and reference publishing and to take the class on a virtual “field trip” in which we will explore various dictionaries on the World Wide Web and see that they not only recapture early traditions of the lone lexicographer like Cawdrey compiling a glossary of “hard words,” but that they also exploit World Wide Web technology in ways earlier lexicographers could hardly have imagined, for example, by linking standard dictionary definitions to more extensive encyclopedia-type material, or by using animation to help define terms in American Sign Language.

Texts: Book: Sidney I. Landau, Dictionaries: the Art and Craft of Lexicography. Cambridge University Press (2001 edition); Course packet with short readings from popular and somewhat more scholarly works (e.g., a selection from Elisabeth Murray’s Caught in the Web of Words, a book about the making of the Oxford English Dictionary and short articles on how to define words).

Requirements & Grading: 1) Dictionary-type definitions of several English words with 3-4-page commentary on lexicographical methods and choices in writing the definitions (30%). A draft will be required.  2) End-of-semester 15-20-page paper (50%) and short oral presentation (15%). A draft will be required.  3) Class participation (5%).

E 321L • American English

35680 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 321L )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35680            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LIN 321L            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Requirements & Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%).

E 324 • Lang/Communication In Sci Fict

35705 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  Elective / U

Unique #:  35705 & 35710 (2 sections)            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, OR T C 603B.

Description: In science fiction the technology or biology of the world the author creates may be foregrounded, playing important roles in the plot, or they may simply be taken for granted. Sometimes, the technology or biology may be well grounded in modern theory. Often, however, accepting the conditions of a science fiction writer's world may require the reader to make an imaginative leap and take for granted technology or biology that's at best described vaguely (for example, the reader might have to go along with the idea that the inability to travel faster than the speed of light has been overcome by the invention of a "transluminescence drive"). Language, which is both biological and social, may be described theoretically. Its relation to intelligence in humans is a matter open to debate and, of course, in confronting alien intelligences all bets may be off. Language (or, more broadly, communication) has been a central part of the plots of some science fiction work, it has also been something in the background, taken for granted just like the fictional "transluminescence drive".

In this course we will look at how language plays a role in four science fiction novels and in several shorter selections. We will examine how language may used to recover lost world, at how language (or communication) is used to establish contact with alien intelligences, and at how language may be used to create world. In addition to the works of fiction we will read, we will use some video material, and we will read short essays written for non-linguists about the linguistic theory relevant to the fiction we are discussing. You don't need a background in either linguistics or science fiction to enjoy this course; all you need is the willingness "to boldly (sic!) go where you haven't been before.”

Texts: (This list is tentative and depends upon availability); Walter W, Miller, Jr. A Canticle for Leibowitz; Ursala K. Le Guin, The Telling; Suzette Haden Elgin, Native Tongue; Selected short stories (to be determined).

Requirements & Grading: 1) Three short (3-5-page) papers with required drafts, 25% each; 2) Oral presentation, 10%; 3) Quizzes, informal writing or other assignments, 10%; 4) Class participation, 5%.

E 324 • Lang/Communication In Sci Fict

35710 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  Elective / U

Unique #:  35705 & 35710 (2 sections)            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, OR T C 603B.

Description: In science fiction the technology or biology of the world the author creates may be foregrounded, playing important roles in the plot, or they may simply be taken for granted. Sometimes, the technology or biology may be well grounded in modern theory. Often, however, accepting the conditions of a science fiction writer's world may require the reader to make an imaginative leap and take for granted technology or biology that's at best described vaguely (for example, the reader might have to go along with the idea that the inability to travel faster than the speed of light has been overcome by the invention of a "transluminescence drive"). Language, which is both biological and social, may be described theoretically. Its relation to intelligence in humans is a matter open to debate and, of course, in confronting alien intelligences all bets may be off. Language (or, more broadly, communication) has been a central part of the plots of some science fiction work, it has also been something in the background, taken for granted just like the fictional "transluminescence drive".

In this course we will look at how language plays a role in four science fiction novels and in several shorter selections. We will examine how language may used to recover lost world, at how language (or communication) is used to establish contact with alien intelligences, and at how language may be used to create world. In addition to the works of fiction we will read, we will use some video material, and we will read short essays written for non-linguists about the linguistic theory relevant to the fiction we are discussing. You don't need a background in either linguistics or science fiction to enjoy this course; all you need is the willingness "to boldly (sic!) go where you haven't been before.”

Texts: (This list is tentative and depends upon availability); Walter W, Miller, Jr. A Canticle for Leibowitz; Ursala K. Le Guin, The Telling; Suzette Haden Elgin, Native Tongue; Selected short stories (to be determined).

Requirements & Grading: 1) Three short (3-5-page) papers with required drafts, 25% each; 2) Oral presentation, 10%; 3) Quizzes, informal writing or other assignments, 10%; 4) Class participation, 5%.

E 321L • American English

35315 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 321L )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35315            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LIN 321L            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Requirements & Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%).

E 379R • Lexicography

35730 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 103
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35730            Flags:  Independent inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No 

E 379R (Topic: Lexicography) and 379S (embedded topic: Lexicography) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Did you know that the first English dictionary, A Table of Alphabeticall of Hard Usual English Words, was published by Robert Cawdrey in 1604? Although later dictionary editors were less enthusiastic about doubling letters than Cawdrey was, the history of dictionary making has been a complex—and sometimes controversial—process involving attempts to provide guidance to the general public about standard, word meanings, etymology, and usage. After a short overview of the history of English dictionaries, which have evolved from short glossaries of “hard words” (technical terms and difficult vocabulary items) to works that attempt to capture most of the vocabulary of English, we will look in detail at how dictionaries are constructed. Topics we will cover include how words are defined, how etymologies (or word histories) are constructed, and how dictionary editors attempt to meet the needs of various audiences, including children, non-native speakers of English, and English-speaking adults, while simultaneously trying to construct dictionaries as records of the English language as it is used. We will also look at how dictionaries are related to other reference works, such as encyclopedias, and at how dictionaries are changing in the rapidly evolving world of computer technology. I hope to provide a guest speaker who can talk about career opportunities in lexicography and reference publishing and to take the class on a virtual “field trip” in which we will explore various dictionaries on the World Wide Web and see that they not only recapture early traditions of the lone lexicographer like Cawdrey compiling a glossary of “hard words,” but that they also exploit World Wide Web technology in ways earlier lexicographers could hardly have imagined, for example, by linking standard dictionary definitions to more extensive encyclopedia-type material, or by using animation to help define terms in American Sign Language.

Texts: Book: Sidney I. Landau, Dictionaries: the Art and Craft of Lexicography. Cambridge University Press (2001 edition); Course packet with short readings from popular and somewhat more scholarly works (e.g., a selection from Elisabeth Murray’s Caught in the Web of Words, a book about the making of the Oxford English Dictionary and short articles on how to define words).

Requirements & Grading: 1) Dictionary-type definitions of several English words with 3-4-page commentary on lexicographical methods and choices in writing the definitions (30%). A draft will be required.  2) End-of-semester 15-20-page paper (50%) and short oral presentation (15%). A draft will be required.  3) Class participation (5%).

E 324 • Lang/Communication In Sci Fict

35324 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  U

Unique #:  35324            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, OR T C 603B.

Description: In science fiction the technology or biology of the world the author creates may be foregrounded, playing important roles in the plot, or they may simply be taken for granted. Sometimes, the technology or biology may be well grounded in modern theory. Often, however, accepting the conditions of a science fiction writer's world may require the reader to make an imaginative leap and take for granted technology or biology that's at best described vaguely (for example, the reader might have to go along with the idea that the inability to travel faster than the speed of light has been overcome by the invention of a "transluminescence drive"). Language, which is both biological and social, may be described theoretically. Its relation to intelligence in humans is a matter open to debate and, of course, in confronting alien intelligences all bets may be off. Language (or, more broadly, communication) has been a central part of the plots of some science fiction work, it has also been something in the background, taken for granted just like the fictional "transluminescence drive".

In this course we will look at how language plays a role in four science fiction novels and in several shorter selections. We will examine how language may used to recover lost world, at how language (or communication) is used to establish contact with alien intelligences, and at how language may be used to create world. In addition to the works of fiction we will read, we will use some video material, and we will read short essays written for non-linguists about the linguistic theory relevant to the fiction we are discussing. You don't need a background in either linguistics or science fiction to enjoy this course; all you need is the willingness "to boldly (sic!) go where you haven't been before.”

Texts: (This list is tentative and depends upon availability); Walter W, Miller, Jr. A Canticle for Leibowitz; Ursala K. Le Guin, The Telling; Suzette Haden Elgin, Native Tongue; Selected short stories (to be determined).

Requirements & Grading: 1) Three short (3-5-page) papers with required drafts, 25% each; 2) Oral presentation, 10%; 3) Quizzes, informal writing or other assignments, 10%; 4) Class participation, 5%.

E 364S • Language And Gender

35580 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 105
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  IV / G

Unique #:  35580            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Who talks more, men or women? Who interrupts more often? Which sex uses more proper speech? How do people signal social attitudes in choosing pronouns to refer to mixed-sex groups? How are gender and sexual orientation constructed in linguistic interaction. For thirty years, sex- and gender-related differences in language and communicative styles have been increasingly examined in linguistic studies. Such research indicates that the answers to these questions are more complicated than you might expect. In this course, we will examine some of the research that show how social expectations and power structures intersect to influence the speech women and men use in particular social situations. We will also look at and discuss current research on how people use language to construct social gender and at how historical, economic, and social situations have shaped the language women and men use.

Texts: Mary Talbot, Language and Gender (2nd ed.)

Readings Packet, possibly to include selections from:

  • Bergvall, Victoria L., Janet M. Bing, and Alice F. Freed eds., Rethinking Language and Gender Research. New York: Longman, 1996.
  • Mary Bucholtz, A.C. Lang, and Laurel A. Sutton, eds., Reinventing Identities. The Gendered Self in Discourse. Oxford/New York. Oxford University Press. 1999.
  • Hall, Kira and Mary Bucholtz, eds., Gender Articulated: Language and the Socially Constructed Self. New York: Routledge. 1995.
  • Johnson, Sally and Ulrike Hanna Meinhof, eds., Language and  Masculinity. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 1997.

Roman, Camille, Suzanne Juhasz, and Cristine Miller, eds., The Women and Language Debate, A Sourcebook. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1994.

Requirements & Grading: Three short (ca. 5-pages with drafts) papers related to the readings (30% each); Participation in class discussion, occasional informal writing assignments, (10%).

Class attendance is mandatory: If you accumulate more than four (4) unexcused absences your final grade will be lowered.

E 321L • American English

35180 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 321L )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35180            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LIN 321L            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Requirements & Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%).

E 364S • Language And Gender

35400 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 206
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Kimball, S            Areas:  IV / G

Unique #:  35400            Flags:  Cultural diversity

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Who talks more, men or women? Who interrupts more often? Which sex uses more proper speech? How do people signal social attitudes in choosing pronouns to refer to mixed-sex groups? How are gender and sexual orientation constructed in linguistic interaction. For thirty years, sex- and gender-related differences in language and communicative styles have been increasingly examined in linguistic studies. Such research indicates that the answers to these questions are more complicated than you might expect. In this course, we will examine some of the research that show how social expectations and power structures intersect to influence the speech women and men use in particular social situations. We will also look at and discuss current research on how people use language to construct social gender and at how historical, economic, and social situations have shaped the language women and men use.

Texts: Textbook: TBA. 

Readings Packet, possibly to include selections from:

  • Bergvall, Victoria L., Janet M. Bing, and Alice F. Freed eds., Rethinking Language and Gender Research. New York: Longman, 1996.
  • Mary Bucholtz, A.C. Lang, and Laurel A. Sutton, eds., Reinventing Identities. The Gendered Self in Discourse. Oxford/New York. Oxford University Press. 1999.
  • Hall, Kira and Mary Bucholtz, eds., Gender Articulated: Language and the Socially Constructed Self. New York: Routledge. 1995.
  • Johnson, Sally and Ulrike Hanna Meinhof, eds., Language and  Masculinity. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 1997.

Roman, Camille, Suzanne Juhasz, and Cristine Miller, eds., The Women and Language Debate, A Sourcebook. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1994.

Requirements & Grading: Three short (ca. 5-pages with drafts) papers related to the readings (30% each); Participation in class discussion, occasional informal writing assignments, (10%).

Class attendance is mandatory: If you accumulate more than four (4) unexcused absences your final grade will be lowered.

E 360K • Intro To English Grammar

35375 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 105
(also listed as LIN 360K )
show description

E 360K and LIN 360K may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course is not intended to teach writing skills or rules of usage. Instead, we will look at the linguistic structure of English from two points of view: traditional grammar and transformational-generative grammar. Topics we will cover include traditional grammatical description and terms, linguistic evidence for the constituent structure of English sentences, arguments for transformations, some basics of modern work on syntax, and questions of usage. 

Texts: M. Kolln and R. Funk, Understanding English Grammar.

Requirements & Grading: Three exams (30% each); Daily homework (10%).

E 379R • Lexicography

35530 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 310
show description

E 379R (Topic: Lexicography) and 379S (embedded topic: Lexicography) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Did you know that the first English dictionary, A Table of Alphabeticall of Hard Usual English Words, was published by Robert Cawdrey in 1604? Although later dictionary editors were less enthusiastic about doubling letters than Cawdrey was, the history of dictionary making has been a complex—and sometimes controversial—process involving attempts to provide guidance to the general public about standard, word meanings, etymology, and usage. After a short overview of the history of English dictionaries, which have evolved from short glossaries of “hard words” (technical terms and difficult vocabulary items) to works that attempt to capture most of the vocabulary of English, we will look in detail at how dictionaries are constructed. Topics we will cover include how words are defined, how etymologies (or word histories) are constructed, and how dictionary editors attempt to meet the needs of various audiences, including children, non-native speakers of English, and English-speaking adults, while simultaneously trying to construct dictionaries as records of the English language as it is used. We will also look at how dictionaries are related to other reference works, such as encyclopedias, and at how dictionaries are changing in the rapidly evolving world of computer technology. I hope to provide a guest speaker who can talk about career opportunities in lexicography and reference publishing and to take the class on a virtual “field trip” in which we will explore various dictionaries on the World Wide Web and see that they not only recapture early traditions of the lone lexicographer like Cawdrey compiling a glossary of “hard words,” but that they also exploit World Wide Web technology in ways earlier lexicographers could hardly have imagined, for example, by linking standard dictionary definitions to more extensive encyclopedia-type material, or by using animation to help define terms in American Sign Language. 

Texts: Book: Sidney I. Landau, Dictionaries: the Art and Craft of Lexicography. Cambridge University Press (2001 edition); Course packet with short readings from popular and somewhat more scholarly works (e.g., a selection from Elisabeth Murray’s Caught in the Web of Words, a book about the making of the Oxford English Dictionary and short articles on how to define words).

Requirements & Grading: 1) Dictionary-type definitions of several English words with 3-4-page commentary on lexicographical methods and choices in writing the definitions (30%). A draft will be required.  2) End-of-semester 15-20-page paper (50%) and short oral presentation (15%). A draft will be required.  3) Class participation (5%).

E 360K • Intro To English Grammar

35660 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 105
(also listed as LIN 360K )
show description

E 360K and LIN 360K may not both be counted.

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: This course is not intended to teach writing skills or rules of usage. Instead, we will look at the linguistic structure of English from two points of view: traditional grammar and transformational-generative grammar. Topics we will cover include traditional grammatical description and terms, linguistic evidence for the constituent structure of English sentences, arguments for transformations, and some basics of modern work on syntax and questions of usage.

Texts: M. Kolln and R. Funk, Understanding English Grammar, 6th edition, Pearson, 2002; Course packet: available at Jenn’s.

Grading: Attendance: Class attendance is mandatory, both for whole-class discussion sessions and for group work.

Attendance will be taken during each class. More than four (4) unexcused absences will affect your final grade adversely.

Homework: I will not accept late homework except by prior arrangement.

Structure and scheduling of the class: The class is divided into two types of meetings: whole-class and group meetings. The course packet contains assignments structured around linguistic analyses and written explanations of grammatical structures for both individual and group work. Homework assignments will, in general, be drawn from the textbook.

Evaluation and grading: There are no midterm or final exams for this class.  Instead, you will be evaluated on the basis of two midterm portfolios and one final portfolio of the work you have done inside and outside of class. You will be responsible for a total of three individual portfolios and for participation in three group portfolios. The individual portfolios should contain all of the written work you have done for the class, including all homework assigned, plus a self-evaluation.

Total grade for the class: Individual work 60% (Writing assignments 33%; Homework 12%); Group work 33%.

Each set of portfolios: Individual work 20% (Writing assignments 18%; Homework 4%); Group work 11%.

E 364S • Language And Gender

35710 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 105
(also listed as WGS 345 )
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Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: Who talks more, men or women? Who interrupts more often? Which sex uses more proper speech? How do people signal social attitudes in choosing pronouns to refer to mixed-sex groups? How are gender and sexual orientation constructed in linguistic interaction. For thirty years, sex- and gender-related differences in language and communicative styles have been increasingly examined in linguistic studies. Such research indicates that the answers to these questions are more complicated than you might expect. In this course, we will examine some of the research that show how social expectations and power structures intersect to influence the speech women and men use in particular social situations. We will also look at and discuss current research on how people use language to construct social gender and at how historical, economic, and social situations have shaped the language women and men use.

Texts: Textbook: TBA.

Readings Packet, possibly to include selections from:

 

  • Bergvall, Victoria L., Janet M. Bing, and Alice F. Freed eds., Rethinking Language and Gender Research. New York: Longman, 1996.
  • Mary Bucholtz, A.C. Lang, and Laurel A. Sutton, eds., Reinventing Identities. The Gendered Self in Discourse. Oxford/New York. Oxford University Press. 1999.
  • Hall, Kira and Mary Bucholtz, eds., Gender Articulated: Language and the Socially Constructed Self. New York: Routledge. 1995.
  • Johnson, Sally and Ulrike Hanna Meinhof, eds., Language and  Masculinity. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 1997.

Roman, Camille, Suzanne Juhasz, and Cristine Miller, eds., The Women and Language Debate, A Sourcebook. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1994.

Grading: Two 3-5-page papers related to the readings (20% each); Final 8-10-page paper (50%); Participation in class discussion, occasional informal writing assignments, (10%).

Class attendance is mandatory: If you accumulate more than four (4) unexcused absences your final grade will be lowered.

E 321L • American English

34490 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 103
(also listed as LIN 321L )
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Cross-listed with LIN 321L

Course Description: In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present.  Topics we will cover include:  the influence of Native American languages; American post-colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins and diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas.  We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African-American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the wake part of emerging computer technology and networked communication.

Texts: Reading packet (available at Jenn's)

Grading: Two short (3-5 page) essays with required drafts (25% each); End-of-semester research paper (8-10 pages) with draft and oral presentation on a topic of your choice (40%); Short oral presentation (8%); Peer Evaluation (2%)

Prerequisites:
Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 379R • Lexicography

34955 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 210
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Course Description: Did you know that the first English dictionary, A Table of Alphabeticall of Hard Usual English Words, was published by Robert Cawdrey in 1604? Although later dictionary editors were less enthusiastic about doubling letters than Cawdrey was, the history of dictionary making has been a complex—and sometimes controversial—process involving attempts to provide guidance to the general public about standard, word meanings, etymology, and usage. After a short overview of the history of English dictionaries, which have evolved from short glossaries of “hard words” (technical terms and difficult vocabulary items) to works that attempt to capture most of the vocabulary of English, we will look in detail at how dictionaries are constructed. Topics we will cover include how words are defined, how etymologies (or word histories) are constructed, and how dictionary editors attempt to meet the needs of various audiences, including children, non-native speakers of English, and English-speaking adults, while simultaneously trying to construct dictionaries as records of the English language as it is used. We will also look at how dictionaries are related to other reference works, such as encyclopedias, and at how dictionaries are changing in the rapidly evolving world of computer technology. I hope to provide a guest speaker who can talk about career opportunities in lexicography and reference publishing and to take the class on a virtual “field trip” in which we will explore various dictionaries on the World Wide Web and see that they not only recapture early traditions of the lone lexicographer like Cawdrey compiling a glossary of “hard words,” but that they also exploit World Wide Web technology in ways earlier lexicographers could hardly have imagined, for example, by linking standard dictionary definitions to more extensive encyclopedia-type material, or by using animation to help define terms in American Sign Language.

Texts: Book: Sidney I. Landau, Dictionaries: the Art and Craft of Lexicography. Cambridge University Press (2001 edition); Course packet with short readings from popular and somewhat more scholarly works (e.g., a selection from Elisabeth Murray’s Caught in the Web of Words, a book about the making of the Oxford English Dictionary and short articles on how to define words).

Grading: 1) Dictionary-type definitions of several English words with 3-4-page commentary on lexicographical methods and choices in writing the definitions (30%). A draft will be required.  2) End-of-semester 15-20-page paper (50%) and short oral presentation (15%). A draft will be required.  3) Class participation (5%)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 321L • American English-W

34680 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 PAR 204
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E321L American English Fall 2007

Sara E. Kimball     /     Phone: 471?8363
Office :Calhoun 15     /     Office hours: M 9?10 & 1?2, W 1?2 & 3?4
email: skimball@uts.cc.utexas.edu


In this class we will examine the development of American English from colonial times through the present. Topics we will cover include: the influence of Native American languages; American post?colonial nationalism and attitudes toward British English; the origins an diffusion of regional dialects; language use in Texas and the south as regional dialect areas. We will also look at modern and modern social and ethnic dialects, including African?American Vernacular English, and at the emergence of new varieties of American ways of speaking and writing in the late twentieth and early twenty?first centuries.

Readings

Readings packet: Available at Jenn's

Requirements

2 three?to?five page papers with required drafts
1 seven?to ten page research paper with required draft and 1?page topic proposal
Short (10 min.) oral presentation on an immigrant group (with partner(s))
Short (10 min.) oral presentation on final paper

Grading

Two three?to?five page papers (20% each = 40%)
Topic Proposal for research paper (5%)
The final Research paper (35%)
Oral presentation on final paper(10%)
Oral presentation on immigrant group (10%)

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 379S • Senior Seminar-W

35145 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 302
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E379S Lexicography

Sara E. Kimball   Phone: 471-8363
Office Calhoun 15   Office hours: M 9-10 & 1-2
email skimball@uts.cc.utexas.edu   W 1-2 & 3-4

How often have you heard people invoke authority by saying, "The dictionary defines ...."?  In this class we will examine how dictionaries have established their authority in the English-speaking world over the past 400 years.  We'll consider how dictionaries differ from other reference works, look at elements of dictionaries for various audiences, learn how lexicographers write definitions, and write definitions of our own.  We will also examine how lexicographers, who view themselves as recorders of the vocabulary of languages, have dealt with tricky questions of usage, and we will  look  at how computerization has affected both the process of dictionary making and the finished products.  We'll end the semester by discussing how dictionaries are made and consider legal and ethical issues in the making of dictionaries.  I hope that you will learn that "the dictionary" comes in a variety of forms, is a complex product of culture, is the work of many people, and has a long and interesting history.

Since this course is a senior seminar, you are expected to write a twenty-page paper on some aspect of dictionaries.  I will also  consider a Web site of sufficient depth and complexity in lieu of the traditional paper.  Although I will hand out some suggestions for possible topic areas broadly defined, the final choice for a paper topic is your own.  I'll ask you to write a topic proposal outlining your project, though I expect your projects will evolve as you write and research.  We will also have conferences to discuss rough drafts toward the end of the semester.

Text

Readings Packet (available at Jenn's)

Policies

Attendance: Class attendance is mandatory. Attendance will be taken during each class.  If you must miss class for a valid reason, get in touch with me as soon as possible.

I normally do not accept late assignments except by prior arrangement.  If you are having problems completing an assignment, get in touch with me as soon as possible to make arrangements.

Requirements and grading

  Final paper   40%
  Topic proposal   15%
  Definition   25%
  Presentation   10%
  Class participation   10%

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 360K • English Grammar-W

35145 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 PAR 208
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TBD

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