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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Kurt Heinzelman

Professor Ph.D., 1978, University of Massachusettes

Kurt Heinzelman

Contact

Interests

British Romanticism 1750-1850; poetry and poetics; creative writing; archives and collecting; modernism and cultural economics.

E 380E • Practicum In Editing

36025 • Fall 2014
Meets F 900am-1200pm PAR 214
show description

Ten years ago the graduate students in the Creative Writing Program inaugurated a literary journal called the Bat City Review.  The journal has received, in this very short time period, national acclaim.  Works from the journal have been featured on poetry daily websites, reviewed favorably by national publications, and included in prize-winning book collections. Published annually, edited and managed entirely by MFA students, BCR is a jewel in the Department's treasury.  As the faculty founder, principal instructor, and ongoing editorial advisor, I worked to develop and maintain what might be called a culture of the journal and to ensure that the editing experience remains pedagogically valuable to the students who undertake it.This course, then, is both a practicum for editing a literary journal and an introduction to the role of literary journals in the U. S. during the last century. Theoretically, the course raises questions of aesthetic value and editorial judgment: in fact, we often begin by reading Descartes's "Discourse on Method." Editing involves understanding how a particular work, whether poetry or fiction, operates within its own genre (and this involves identifying the genre in the first place, not always an easy task, especially if the genre is being bent by the work in question or the reader is unfamiliar with the generic conventions that are being bent).  So, one strain of course preparations has to do with this issue of establishing a basis for aesthetic evaluation, which is quite different from liking the work that you like.The largest part of the course entails discussion and evaluation of actual submissions to the journal, both poetry and prose.  These submissions run into the thousands.  So, this is a hands-on course.

READING LIST

Descartes, "Discourse on Method"

The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History, ed. Elliott Anderson and Mary Kinzie

Selected reading of peer journals

REQUIREMENTS

Successful reading of all submission materials, plus supplementary reading of secondary and primary texts.  Weekly evaluative writing assignments.  Occasional administrative tasks pertaining to management of periodical publication. The final exam is the completion of the year's new issue.

 

 

E F329R • The Romantic Period

83185 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Heinzelman, K

Unique #:  83185

Semester:  Summer 2014, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will focus on roughly a forty-year period, from the French Revolution in 1789 to the great Whig electoral victory of 1830, a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned. It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment. Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers we now call the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it. They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent ones. Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories.

We shall engage in close readings of some writers who comprise the first generation of Romantics, people for whom the French Revolution and its astonishing aftershocks coincided with their own early adulthood. These writers will include principally William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and John Keats among others, but our aim will not be to appreciate their texts solely for their aesthetic appeal; rather, we shall try to develop ways of applying these texts to the larger texture of material life of which they are a part. We will attempt to construe these first "modern" works by asking ourselves to become conscious of and responsible for the way we go about construing literature as a subject of study.

This is not a course, then, in literary criticism nor in the literary history of the early nineteenth century (although we will practice the former and take the latter as our nominal subject). It is, instead, a course in the sociology of literary practice, using the actual practices of these Romantic writers as what landscape artists of the period called "the ground." Let us think of this course as subtitled "The Possibilities for Creativity." What materials are available? What strategies of artistic representation? What anxieties of failure? What burden of the past? What chances of success? The pertinence of these questions for us, living in the early twenty-first century, almost exactly two hundred years after our starting year of 1789, may not be immediately self-evident. But we don't read historical texts merely to discover their relevance to us. We also read them to find out exactly what has been lost, what is now impertinent, and why. In studying the "possibilities for creativity," we will be returned by these literary works to the task of learning to analyze the limits of our own creativity.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson—Fourth Edition.

Attendance: The reading for the class happens outside class. But all the work of the class happens in class. Therefore, class attendance is mandatory. To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not have more than two unexcused absences.

Requirements & Grading: Approximately 4 quizzes and 1 final exam over the course of the term = 80%; Class participation and preparation = 20%.

E 325P • Poetry Writing

35920 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 310
show description

Instructor:  Heinzelman, K

Unique #:  35920

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

E 325 (Topic 2: Creative Writing: Poetry) and 325P may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Poetry is a craft, a practice—as music is, or carpentry. There are things to be learned, although that doesn't mean you can't start writing poems before you've learned them, any more than you must avoid singing before you've figured out the sonata form. Still, odd results will occur if you start constructing a table without some fundamental knowledge of how tables (or power saws) work.

This, then, is a course in the principles of poetic design. We will write a lot of poems and will read a lot more, for this is not just a "how-to-write" course: it is also a how-to-read course, with the ultimate goal being how to read what you yourself have written so as to (re)write it more effectively.

Texts: Writing Poems, eds. Boisseau, Bar-Nadar, and Wallace, 8th edition; Poems produced by students in this workshop.

Course objectives:

  • To become familiar with modern poetry in English
  • To develop advanced reading skills
  • To develop the skills of collaborative response and revision that a writing workshop fosters
  • To practice adapting appropriate writing styles to different rhetorical situations
  • To learn how to revise, edit, and proofread for maximum effect

E 380E • Practicum In Editing

36055 • Fall 2013
Meets F 900am-1200pm PAR 214
show description

Practicum in Literary Editing: BAT CITY REVIEW

Ten years ago the graduate students in the Creative Writing Program inaugurated a literary journal called the Bat City Review.  The journal has received, in this very short time period, national acclaim.  Works from the journal have been featured on poetry daily websites, reviewed favorably by national publications, and included in prize-winning book collections. Published annually, edited and managed entirely by MFA students, BCR is a jewel in the Department's treasury.  As the faculty founder, principal instructor, and ongoing editorial advisor, I worked to develop and maintain what might be called a culture of the journal and to ensure that the editing experience remains pedagogically valuable to the students who undertake it.

This course, then, is both a practicum for editing a literary journal and an introduction to the role of literary journals in the U. S. during the last century. Theoretically, the course raises questions of aesthetic value and editorial judgment: in fact, we often begin by reading Descartes's "Discourse on Method." Editing involves understanding how a particular work, whether poetry or fiction, operates within its own genre (and this involves identifying the genre in the first place, not always an easy task, especially if the genre is being bent by the work in question or the reader is unfamiliar with the generic conventions that are being bent).  So, one strain of course preparations has to do with this issue of establishing a basis for aesthetic evaluation, which is quite different from liking the work that you like

The largest part of the course entails discussion and evaluation of actual submissions to the journal, both poetry and prose.  These submissions run into the thousands.  So, this is a hands-on course.

READING LIST

Descartes, "Discourse on Method"

The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History, ed. Elliott Anderson and Mary Kinzie

Selected reading of peer journals

REQUIREMENTS

Successful reading of all submission materials, plus supplementary reading of secondary and primary texts.  Weekly evaluative writing assignments.  Occasional administrative tasks pertaining to management of periodical publication. The final exam is the completion of the year's new issue.

E F329R • The Romantic Period

83543 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 0.104
show description

Instructor:  Heinzelman, K            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  83543            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 329K and 329R may not both be counted. E 329L and 329R may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will focus on roughly a forty-year period, from the French Revolution in 1789 to the great Whig electoral victory of 1830, a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned. It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment. Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers we now call the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it. They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent ones. Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories.

We shall engage in close readings of some writers who comprise the first generation of Romantics, people for whom the French Revolution and its astonishing aftershocks coincided with their own early adulthood. These writers will include principally William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and John Keats among others, but our aim will not be to appreciate their texts solely for their aesthetic appeal; rather, we shall try to develop ways of applying these texts to the larger texture of material life of which they are a part. We will attempt to construe these first "modern" works by asking ourselves to become conscious of and responsible for the way we go about construing literature as a subject of study.

This is not a course, then, in literary criticism nor in the literary history of the early nineteenth century (although we will practice the former and take the latter as our nominal subject). It is, instead, a course in the sociology of literary practice, using the actual practices of these Romantic writers as what landscape artists of the period called "the ground." Let us think of this course as subtitled "The Possibilities for Creativity." What materials are available? What strategies of artistic representation? What anxieties of failure? What burden of the past? What chances of success? The pertinence of these questions for us, living in the early twenty-first century, almost exactly two hundred years after our starting year of 1789, may not be immediately self-evident. But we don't read historical texts merely to discover their relevance to us. We also read them to find out exactly what has been lost, what is now impertinent, and why. In studying the "possibilities for creativity," we will be returned by these literary works to the task of learning to analyze the limits of our own creativity.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson—Fifth Edition.

Attendance: The reading for the class happens outside class. But all the work of the class happens in class. Therefore, class attendance is mandatory. To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not have more than two unexcused absences.

Requirements & Grading: Approximately 4 quizzes and 1 final exam over the course of the term = 80%; Class participation and preparation = 20%.

E 380E • Practicum In Editing

35755 • Fall 2012
Meets F 900am-1200pm PAR 214
show description

Practicum in Literary Editing: BAT CITY REVIEW

Eight years ago the graduate students in The Department's Creative Writing Program inaugurated a literary journal called the Bat City Review.  The journal has received, in this very short time period, national acclaim.  Works from the journal have been featured on poetry daily websites, reviewed favorably by national publications, and included in prize-winning book collections. Published annually, edited and managed entirely by Creative Writing students, BCR is a jewel in the Department's treasury.  As the faculty founder, principal instructor, and ongoing editorial advisor, I worked to develop and maintain what might be called a culture of the journal and to ensure that the editing experience remains pedagogically valuable to the students who undertake it.

This course, then, is both a practicum for editing a literary journal and an introduction to the role of literary journals in the U. S. during the last century. Theoretically, the course raises questions of aesthetic value and editorial judgment: in fact, we begin by reading Descartes's "Discourse on Method."  Often this involves understanding how a particular work, whether poetry or fiction, operates within its own genre (and this involves identifying the genre in the first place, not always an easy task, especially if the genre is being bent by the work in question or the reader is unfamiliar with the generic conventions that are being bent).  So, one strain of course preparations has to do with this issue of establishing a basis for aesthetic evaluation, which is quite different from liking the work that you like.

A large part of the course will also be discussion and evaluation of actual submissions to the journal, both poetry and prose.  These submissions run into the thousands for poetry, several hundred for fiction.  So, this is a hands-on course.

READING LIST

Descartes, "Discourse on Method"

The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History, ed. Elliott Anderson and Mary Kinzie

Selected journal reading—Glimmer Train, Missouri Review, One Story, Tin House, Poetry, Zootrope, Agni, Mid-American Review

REQUIREMENTS

Successful reading of all submission materials, plus supplementary reading of secondary and primary texts.  Weekly evaluative writing assignments.  Occasional administrative tasks pertaining to management of periodical publication. The final exam is the completion of the year's new issue.

E 329R • The Romantic Period

35260 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WAG 112
show description

Instructor:  Heinzelman, K            Areas:  II

Unique #:  35260            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will focus on roughly a forty-year period, from the French Revolution in 1789 to the great Whig electoral victory of 1830, a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned. It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment. Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers we now call the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it. They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent ones. Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories. 

We shall engage in close readings of some writers who comprise the first generation of Romantics, people for whom the French Revolution and its astonishing aftershocks coincided with their own early adulthood. These writers will include principally William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and John Keats among others, but our aim will not be to appreciate their texts solely for their aesthetic appeal; rather, we shall try to develop ways of applying these texts to the larger texture of material life of which they are a part. We will attempt to construe these first "modern" works by asking ourselves to become conscious of and responsible for the way we go about construing literature as a subject of study.

This is not a course, then, in literary criticism nor in the literary history of the early nineteenth century (although we will practice the former and take the latter as our nominal subject). It is, instead, a course in the sociology of literary practice, using the actual practices of these Romantic writers as what landscape artists of the period called "the ground." Let us think of this course as subtitled "The Possibilities for Creativity." What materials are available? What strategies of artistic representation? What anxieties of failure? What burden of the past? What chances of success? The pertinence of these questions for us, living in the early twenty-first century, almost exactly two hundred years after our starting year of 1789, may not be immediately self-evident. But we don't read historical texts merely to discover their relevance to us. We also read them to find out exactly what has been lost, what is now impertinent, and why. In studying the "possibilities for creativity," we will be returned by these literary works to the task of learning to analyze the limits of our own creativity.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson—Fourth Edition.

Attendance:

The reading for the class happens outside class. But all the work of the class happens in class. Therefore, class attendance is mandatory. To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not have more than two unexcused absences.

Requirements & Grading: Approximately 4 quizzes and 1 final exam over the course of the term = 80%; Class participation and preparation = 20%.

E 380E • Practicum In Editing

35565 • Fall 2011
Meets F 900am-1200pm PAR 214
show description

Ten years ago the graduate students in the Creative Writing Program inaugurated a literary journal called the Bat City Review.  The journal has received, in this very short time period, national acclaim.  Works from the journal have been featured on poetry daily websites, reviewed favorably by national publications, and included in prize-winning book collections. Published annually, edited and managed entirely by MFA students, BCR is a jewel in the Department's treasury.  As the faculty founder, principal instructor, and ongoing editorial advisor, I worked to develop and maintain what might be called a culture of the journal and to ensure that the editing experience remains pedagogically valuable to the students who undertake it.

This course, then, is both a practicum for editing a literary journal and an introduction to the role of literary journals in the U. S. during the last century. Theoretically, the course raises questions of aesthetic value and editorial judgment: in fact, we often begin by reading Descartes's "Discourse on Method." Editing involves understanding how a particular work, whether poetry or fiction, operates within its own genre (and this involves identifying the genre in the first place, not always an easy task, especially if the genre is being bent by the work in question or the reader is unfamiliar with the generic conventions that are being bent).  So, one strain of course preparations has to do with this issue of establishing a basis for aesthetic evaluation, which is quite different from liking the work that you like.

The largest part of the course entails discussion and evaluation of actual submissions to the journal, both poetry and prose.  These submissions run into the thousands.  So, this is a hands-on course.

READING LIST
Descartes, "Discourse on Method"
The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History, ed. Elliott Anderson and Mary Kinzie
Selected reading of peer journals

REQUIREMENTS
Successful reading of all submission materials, plus supplementary reading of secondary and primary texts.  Weekly evaluative writing assignments.  Occasional administrative tasks pertaining to management of periodical publication. The final exam is the completion of the year's new issue.

 

 

E F329R • The Romantic Period

83560 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 105
show description

E 329K and 329R may not both be counted. E 329L and 329R may not both be counted.

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course will focus on roughly a forty-year period, from the French Revolution in 1789 to the great Whig electoral victory of 1830, a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned. It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment. Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers we now call the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it. They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent ones. Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories.

 

We shall engage in close readings of some writers who comprise the first generation of Romantics, people for whom the French Revolution and its astonishing aftershocks coincided with their own early adulthood. These writers will include principally William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and John Keats among others, but our aim will not be to appreciate their texts solely for their aesthetic appeal; rather, we shall try to develop ways of applying these texts to the larger texture of material life of which they are a part. We will attempt to construe these first "modern" works by asking ourselves to become conscious of and responsible for the way we go about construing literature as a subject of study.

 

This is not a course, then, in literary criticism nor in the literary history of the early nineteenth century (although we will practice the former and take the latter as our nominal subject). It is, instead, a course in the sociology of literary practice, using the actual practices of these Romantic writers as what landscape artists of the period called "the ground." Let us think of this course as subtitled "The Possibilities for Creativity." What materials are available? What strategies of artistic representation? What anxieties of failure? What burden of the past? What chances of success? The pertinence of these questions for us, living in the early twenty-first century, almost exactly two hundred years after our starting year of 1789, may not be immediately self-evident. But we don't read historical texts merely to discover their relevance to us. We also read them to find out exactly what has been lost, what is now impertinent, and why. In studying the "possibilities for creativity," we will be returned by these literary works to the task of learning to analyze the limits of our own creativity. 

 

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson—Fourth Edition.

 

Attendance: The reading for the class happens outside class. But all the work of the class happens in class. Therefore, class attendance is mandatory. To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not have more than two unexcused absences.

 

Requirements & Grading: Approximately 4 quizzes and 1 final exam over the course of the term = 80%; Class participation and preparation = 20%.

E 329R • The Romantic Period

35490 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 308
show description

E 329R: British Romantic Literature

Description: This course will focus on roughly a forty-year period, from the French Revolution in 1789 to the great Whig electoral victory of 1830, a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned.  It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment.  Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers we now call the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it.  They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent ones.  Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories.

We shall engage in close readings of some writers who comprise the first generation of Romantics, people for whom the French Revolution and its astonishing aftershocks coincided with their own early adulthood.  These writers will include principally William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge,  and John Keats among others, but our aim will not be to appreciate their texts solely for their aesthetic appeal; rather, we shall try to develop ways of applying these texts to the larger texture of material life of which they are a part.  We will attempt to construe these first "modern" works by asking ourselves to become conscious of and responsible for the way we go about construing literature as a subject of study.

This is not a course, then, in literary criticism nor in the literary history of the early nineteenth century (although we will practice the former and take the latter as our nominal subject).  It is, instead, a course in the sociology of literary practice, using the actual practices of these Romantic writers as what landscape artists of the period called "the ground."  Let us think of this course as subtitled "The Possibilities for Creativity."  What materials are available?  What strategies of artistic representation?  What anxieties of failure?  What burden of the past?  What chances of success?  The pertinence of these questions for us, living in the early twenty-first century, almost exactly two hundred years after our starting year of 1789, may not be immediately self-evident.  But we don't read historical texts merely to discover their relevance to us.  We also read them to find out exactly what has been lost, what is now impertinent, and why.  In studying the "possibilities for creativity," we will be returned by these literary works to the task of learning to analyze the limits of our own creativity.

Text

Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson—Fourth Edition

Attendance:

The reading for the class happens outside class. But all the work of the class happens in class. Therefore, class attendance is mandatory.  To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not have more than two unexcused absences. 

Requirements:

There will be approximately 4 quizzes and 1 final exam over the course of the term = 80%

Class participation and preparation = 20%

Prerequisite:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

English Major Area:  II. Period or Survey

E 380E • Practicum In Editing

34975 • Fall 2010
Meets F 900am-1200pm PAR 214
show description

Seven years ago the graduate students in The Department's Creative Writing Program inaugurated a literary journal called the Bat City Review.  The journal has received, in this very short time period, national acclaim.  Works from the journal have been featured on poetry daily websites, reviewed favorably by national publications, and included in prize-winning book collections. Published annually, edited and managed entirely by Creative Writing students, BCR is a jewel in the Department's treasury.  As the faculty founder, principal instructor, and ongoing editorial advisor, I worked to develop and maintain what might be called a culture of the journal and to ensure that the editing experience remains pedagogically valuable to the students who undertake it.

This course, then, is both a practicum for editing a literary journal and an introduction to the role of literary journals in the U. S. during the last century. Theoretically, the course raises questions of aesthetic value and editorial judgment: in fact, we begin by reading Descartes's "Discourse on Method."  Often this involves understanding how a particular work, whether poetry or fiction, operates within its own genre (and this involves identifying the genre in the first place, not always an easy task, especially if the genre is being bent by the work in question or the reader is unfamiliar with the generic conventions that are being bent).  So, one strain of course preparations has to do with this issue of establishing a basis for aesthetic evaluation, which is quite different from liking the work that you like.

A large part of the course will also be discussion and evaluation of actual submissions to the journal, both poetry and prose.  These submissions run into the thousands for poetry, several hundred for fiction.  So, this is a hands-on course.

Requirements

Successful reading of all submission materials, plus supplementary reading of secondary and primary texts.  Weekly evaluative writing assignments.  Occasional administrative tasks pertaining to management of periodical publication. The final exam is the completion of the year's new issue.

Readings

Descartes, "Discourse on Method"

The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History, ed. Elliott Anderson and Mary Kinzie

Selected journal reading—Glimmer Train, Missouri Review, One Story, Tin House, Poetry, Zootrope, Agni, Mid-American Review

 

E 329K • Early Romantic Per, 1780-1815

83275 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 206
show description

Course Description: This course will focus on roughly a forty-year period, from the French Revolution in 1789 to the great Whig electoral victory of 1830, a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned. It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment. Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers we now call the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it. They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent ones. Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories.

We shall engage in close readings of some writers who comprise the first generation of Romantics, people for whom the French Revolution and its astonishing aftershocks coincided with their own early adulthood. These writers will include principally William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, among others, but our aim will not be to appreciate their texts solely for their aesthetic appeal; rather, we shall try to develop ways of applying these texts to the larger texture of material life of which they are a part. We will attempt to construe these first "modern" works by asking ourselves to become conscious of and responsible for the way we go about construing literature as a subject of study.

This is not a course, then, in literary criticism nor in the literary history of the early nineteenth century (although we will practice the former and take the latter as our nominal subject). It is, instead, a course in the sociology of literary practice, using the actual practices of these Romantic writers as what landscape artists of the period called "the ground." Let us think of this course as subtitled "The Possibilities for Creativity." What materials are available? What strategies of artistic representation? What anxieties of failure? What burden of the past? What chances of success? The pertinence of these questions for us, living in the late twentieth century, almost exactly two hundred years after our starting year of 1789, may not be immediately self-evident. But we don't read historical texts merely to discover their relevance to us. We also read them to find out exactly what has been lost, what is now impertinent, and why. In studying the "possibilities for creativity," we will be returned by these literary works to the task of learning to analyze the limits of our own creativity.

Texts: Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson.

Grading: Requirements: There will be short-answer quizzes every Friday = 85%; Class participation and preparation = 15%. Attendance: There are only 25 class periods in the summer session, and they are only a bit longer than an hour each. All the work of the class happens in class. Therefore, class attendance is mandatory. To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not miss more than two classes.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 329K • Early Romantic Per, 1780-1815

34760 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CAL 323
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E 329K, British Romantic Literature

Instructor:  Professor Kurt Heinzelman, Parlin 121, 471-6688, kheinz@mail.utexas.edu
(Spring 2010)

 

Description

This course will focus on roughly a forty-year period, from the French Revolution in 1789 to the great Whig electoral victory of 1830, a period that acts as a kind of "fertile crescent" in which modernity was spawned.  It was a time of dramatic cultural and economic upheaval, of great expectations for the improvement of society, and of equally great disappointment and political retrenchment.  Deliberately, at times even programmatically, the writers we now call the Romantics set out not only to interpret the history of their times but also to change it.  They wanted to imagine an aesthetic philosophy that would account for man as a totality--as a being who endures psychological growth along with fixation and repression, who is both an individual and a social animal, and who lives in history but can imagine other histories that are possible, including transcendent ones.  Ironically, this search for a totalizing vision of "man" occurred simultaneously with a new self-consciousness that this term could be, and indeed had to be, separated into gendered categories.

We shall engage in close readings of some writers who comprise the first generation of Romantics, people for whom the French Revolution and its astonishing aftershocks coincided with their own early adulthood.  These writers will include principally William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, among others, but our aim will not be to appreciate their texts solely for their aesthetic appeal; rather, we shall try to develop ways of applying these texts to the larger texture of material life of which they are a part.  We will attempt to construe these first "modern" works by asking ourselves to become conscious of and responsible for the way we go about construing literature as a subject of study.

This is not a course, then, in literary criticism nor in the literary history of the early nineteenth century (although we will practice the former and take the latter as our nominal subject).  It is, instead, a course in the sociology of literary practice, using the actual practices of these Romantic writers as what landscape artists of the period called "the ground."  Let us think of this course as subtitled "The Possibilities for Creativity."  What materials are available?  What strategies of artistic representation?  What anxieties of failure?  What burden of the past?  What chances of success?  The pertinence of these questions for us, living in the late twentieth century, almost exactly two hundred years after our starting year of 1789, may not be immediately self-evident.  But we don't read historical texts merely to discover their relevance to us.  We also read them to find out exactly what has been lost, what is now impertinent, and why.  In studying the "possibilities for creativity," we will be returned by these literary works to the task of learning to analyze the limits of our own creativity.

Text

Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, ed. Damrosch, Manning, and Wolfson—Fourth Edition

Attendance:

The reading for the class happens outside class. But all the work of the class happens in class. Therefore, class attendance is mandatory.  To receive a grade of C or higher, you may not have more than two unexcused absences. 

Requirements:

There will be approximately 4 quizzes and 1 final exam over the course of the term = 80%
Class participation and preparation = 20%

¤ Prerequisite: 

Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

¤ English Major Area: 

II. Period or Survey

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 318L • Poetry-W

34935-34950 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WAG 201
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E 318L: Poetry

Unique #s: 34935, 34940
Professor Kurt Heinzelman

E 380E • Practicum In Editing

35365 • Fall 2009
Meets F 900-1200 PAR 214
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Ten years ago the graduate students in the Creative Writing Program inaugurated a literary journal called the Bat City Review.  The journal has received, in this very short time period, national acclaim.  Works from the journal have been featured on poetry daily websites, reviewed favorably by national publications, and included in prize-winning book collections. Published annually, edited and managed entirely by MFA students, BCR is a jewel in the Department's treasury.  As the faculty founder, principal instructor, and ongoing editorial advisor, I worked to develop and maintain what might be called a culture of the journal and to ensure that the editing experience remains pedagogically valuable to the students who undertake it.

This course, then, is both a practicum for editing a literary journal and an introduction to the role of literary journals in the U. S. during the last century. Theoretically, the course raises questions of aesthetic value and editorial judgment: in fact, we often begin by reading Descartes's "Discourse on Method." Editing involves understanding how a particular work, whether poetry or fiction, operates within its own genre (and this involves identifying the genre in the first place, not always an easy task, especially if the genre is being bent by the work in question or the reader is unfamiliar with the generic conventions that are being bent).  So, one strain of course preparations has to do with this issue of establishing a basis for aesthetic evaluation, which is quite different from liking the work that you like.

The largest part of the course entails discussion and evaluation of actual submissions to the journal, both poetry and prose.  These submissions run into the thousands.  So, this is a hands-on course.

READING LIST
Descartes, "Discourse on Method"
The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History, ed. Elliott Anderson and Mary Kinzie
Selected reading of peer journals

REQUIREMENTS
Successful reading of all submission materials, plus supplementary reading of secondary and primary texts.  Weekly evaluative writing assignments.  Occasional administrative tasks pertaining to management of periodical publication. The final exam is the completion of the year's new issue.

 

 

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