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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Lance Bertelsen

Professor Ph.D., 1979, University of Washington

Lance Bertelsen

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-8769
  • Office: PAR 314
  • Office Hours: M 2:15-3:15 & Th 2:15-4:15
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Biography

Lance Bertelsen's research centers on eighteenth-century popular and material culture and its relation to literature. He is the author of The Nonsense Club (Oxford, 1986) and Henry Fielding at Work (Palgrave, 2000). His current research concerns Captain James Cook's subordinates on the third voyage and their role in preserving and constructing its legacy. Bertelsen also has research interests in World War II; his essay, "San Pietro and the 'Art' and War" (Southwest Review, 1989) won the 1990 Texas Institute of Letters O.Henry Award. He currently holds the Iris Howard Regents Professorship in English Literature and has served six times as director of the Oxford English Summer Program and four times as faculty on the Normandy Scholar Program. 

Interests

Eighteenth-century British literature and culture; representations of World War II.

E F349S • Jane Austen

83200 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm PAR 1
show description

Instructor:  Bertelsen, L

Unique #:  83200

Semester:  Summer 2014, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  non-Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic 1), 379M (Topic: Jane Austen), 379M (Topic: Jane Austen on Location).

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course will emphasize the dialectic of land and sea in Jane Austen’s work and life. We will read Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, and Persuasion—the first two novels addressing the relationship of estates, money, and marriage at the end of the eighteenth century; the second two engaging a wider world, including West Indian plantations, seaside resorts, and most importantly the Royal Navy, at the dawn of the nineteenth century.  The first half of the course will pay special attention to the landed gentry and clergy who formed the society into which Jane Austen was born and which she knew most intimately. The second half will examine the careers of her two youngest brothers, both of whom served as British naval officers during the Napoleonic wars, as we explore Austen’s novelistic treatment of life on the home front in a nation under threat of invasion and on the verge of becoming an imperial power.

Texts: (Note: under no circumstances purchase the all-in-one Penguin edition of Austen’s novels.)

Northanger Abbey (Broadview, 1994); Pride and Prejudice, Donald Gray (Norton Critical 3rd ed., 2001); Mansfield Park (Broadview, 2001); Persuasion, Deidre Shauna Lynch, ed. (Oxford, 2008).

Requirements & Grading: four quizzes (15% each); take home final essay exam (40%).

E 363K • Classic To Romantic

36135 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Bertelsen, L

Unique #:  36135

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will address the cultural shift away from neo-classical values that purportedly occurred in England (and in Europe and America) from the mid-eighteenth century through early nineteenth century. We will begin by reading the work of Pope, Johnson, and Reynolds in an attempt to define neo-classicism. We will spend a good deal of time discussing the emotionally-charged work of the “poets of sensibility” at mid-century and see what Jane Austen makes of the contrast between sense and sensibility in the novel of that name. We will then read the sensational gothic novel The Monk by Matthew Lewis, contextualized with romantic poetry deriving from the gothic. Finally, we will survey the various “romanticisms” of Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Keats.

Texts: Price, ed., Restoration and Eighteenth Century; Wolfson & Manning, eds., Longman Anthology of English Literature: The Romantics; Austen, Sense and Sensibility; M. Lewis, The Monk.

Requirements & Grading: Five quizzes, 10% each (50%); midterm exam, 20%; take home final essay exam, 30%.

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: British

83715 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 224
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Instructor:  Bertelsen, L            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  83715            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course will introduce students to masterpieces (and some minor pieces) of the British literary tradition, emphasizing historical, generic, and thematic connections. Our theme will be Literary Voyages. Lecture and discussion.

Texts: Norton Anthology of English Literature (8th Major Authors edition); Shakespeare, The Tempest, Austen, Pride and Prejudice.

Requirements & Grading: Six quizzes, 10% each; six-page essay exam, 30%; participation, 10%.

E 349S • Jane Austen

35505 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Bertelsen, L            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35505            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Jane Austen may be the best-selling novelist of all time.  She is one of the few authors whose work is regularly read for pleasure by a general audience almost 200 years after it was written.  She is an author whose critical reputation is secure—indeed, rising—within the academy.  And she has recently become something of a media star—230 years after her birth—because of a succession of successful filmed adaptations of her work.

This seminar will offer readings in all six of Jane Austen’s canonical novels—Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion—as well as selections from the Juvenilia (i.e. her unpublished youthful writing), Lady Susan, the fragment Sanditon and her surviving letters.  Significant attention will be paid to Austen's life and social environment and to past and current critical debates regarding her work.  In addition, we will view some of the spate of recent films and discuss their relation to the novels.

Texts: Northanger Abbey; Sense and Sensibility; Pride and Prejudice; Mansfield Park; Emma; Persuasion; Lady Susan; Sanditon.

Requirements & Grading: Four 2-page memos, 10% each = 40%; One oral report & write-up, 10%; Two 5-page essays, 25% each = 50%.

E 363K • Classic To Romantic

35600 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 208
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Instructor:  Bertelsen, L            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  35600            Flags:  Global Cultures, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will address the cultural shift away from neo-classical values that purportedly occurred in England (and in Europe and America) from the mid-eighteenth century through early nineteenth century. We will begin by reading the work of Pope, Johnson, and Reynolds in an attempt to define neo-classicism. We will spend a good deal of time discussing the emotionally-charged work of the “poets of sensibility” at mid-century and see what Jane Austen makes of the contrast between sense and sensibility in the novel of that name. We will then read the sensational gothic novel The Monk by Matthew Lewis, contextualized with romantic poetry deriving from the gothic. Finally, we will survey the various “romanticisms” of Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Keats.

Texts: Price, ed., Restoration and Eighteenth Century; Wolfson & Manning, eds., Longman Anthology of English Literature: The Romantics; Austen, Sense and Sensibility; M. Lewis, The Monk.

Requirements & Grading: Two 5-page essays, 25% each; three 2-page memos, 30%; one revision memo, 10%; participation, 10%.

E 320L • Maj Writ Of Restoratn/18th Cen

35295 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 306
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Instructor:  Bertelsen, L            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  35295            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Spanning the century and comprising a wide selection of genres, the course will offer readings in significant eighteenth-century authors and texts. The goal will be to provide the student with a chronological, thematic, and contextual understanding of the development and contradictions of the literature produced in Britain between 1700 and 1800.

Texts:

Pope, Major Works (Oxford)

Swift, Essential Writings (Norton)

Haywood, Fantomina (Broadview)

Gay, The Beggar’s Opera (Penguin)

Hogarth, Prints (Dover)

Lewis, The Monk (Penguin)

Various poetry & prose from ECCO

Requirements & Grading: Four 2-page memos, 10% each; two 5-page essays, 25% each; Participation, 10%.

E 363K • Classic To Romantic

35570 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Bertelsen, L            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  35570            Flags:  Global Cultures, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will address the cultural shift away from neo-classical values that purportedly occurred in England (and in Europe and America) from the mid-eighteenth century through early nineteenth century. We will begin by reading the work of Pope, Johnson, and Reynolds in an attempt to define neo-classicism. We will spend a good deal of time discussing the emotionally-charged work of the “poets of sensibility” at mid-century and see what Jane Austen makes of the contrast between sense and sensibility in the novel of that name. We will then read the sensational gothic novel The Monk by Matthew Lewis, contextualized with romantic poetry deriving from the gothic. Finally, we will survey the various “romanticisms” of Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Keats.

Texts: Price, ed., Restoration and Eighteenth Century; Wolfson & Manning, eds., Longman Anthology of English Literature: The Romantics; Austen, Sense and Sensibility; M. Lewis, The Monk.

Requirements & Grading: Two 5-page essays, 25% each; three 2-page memos, 30%; one revision memo, 10%; participation, 10%.

E S349S • Jane Austen-Eng

83880 • Summer 2012
Meets
show description

Instructor:  Bertelsen, L            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  83880            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions: Oxford Summer Program participants

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

 

Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic 1), 379M (Topic: Jane Austen), 379M (Topic: Jane Austen on Location).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This class reads four novels by Jane Austen in the context of the real world locations that served as settings for her stories and her life. We will read Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion in order of publication and visit the estates and towns featured in these fictions. Like the heroine of Pride and Prejudice, we will tour rich country estates and eighteenth-century gardens, particularly those at West Wycombe and Chatsworth (a possible model for Pemberley which we will visit on an overnight excursion into the Peak District). We will also explore the significance of urban environments in her work. Sense and Sensibility features the symbolic topography of west London, and we will walk the streets where Mrs. Jennings, Col. Brandon, and Willoughby lived. Northanger Abbey and Persuasion both feature the city of Bath, where Austen and her family lived for many years and where we will spend an entire day. The effect of Jane Austen’s family on her work will form a third focal point, and we will travel through Hampshire to the village of Chawton, where Austen’s former home is now a museum. Throughout the course, we will spend as much time as possible outdoors—reconstructing through novels, journals, and discussion Jane Austen's real world and her imagined one.

Texts: (Note: under no circumstances purchase the all-in-one Penguin edition of Austen’s novels.)

Sense and Sensibility, Ross Ballaster, ed. (Penguin, 2003); Pride and Prejudice, Donald Gray (Norton Critical 3rd ed., 2001); Northanger Abbey, Marilyn Butler, ed. (Penguin, 2003); Persuasion, Deidre Shauna Lynch, ed. (Oxford, 2008).

Requirements & Grading: Daily reading and site journal (30%); 1 research report of 2 pages PERSON, PLACE, AND THING  (20%); 1 final essay exam of 5 pages (40%); Participation and attendance  (10%).

E 349S • Austen And Burney-Honors

35325 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 302
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Instructor:  Bertelsen, L            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35325            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  English Honors

Cross-lists:  LAH 350            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Burney, Austen, and the Navy --

            In late January 1778, aboard Cook’s H.M.S. Discovery, Lieutenant James Burney experienced first contact with the people of Hawai’i and entered a new world of possibilities and dangers. Back in London, Burney’s sister wrote, “This year was ushered in by a grand and important event”—but she was not talking about what her brother was doing on Kauai. No, she was writing of a different but no less perilous first contact. She continued, “for at the latter end of January the literary world was favoured with the first publication of the ingenious, learned, and most profound Fanny Burney!—I doubt not but this memorable affair will, in future times, mark the period whence chronologers will date the zenith of the polite arts in this island! This admirable authoress has named her most elaborate performance, ‘EVELINA, OR A YOUNG LADY’S ENTRANCE INTO THE WORLD.’”

            For a young gentlewoman to enter the world of eighteenth-century print culture required something like the bravery of a sailor setting out to sea, and in the writings and careers of Fanny Burney and Jane Austen we sense the adventurousness of two women whose brothers did indeed go to sea: James Burney on Cook’s second and third voyages, and Frank and Charles Austen as officers in the Royal Navy during the long sea war against Napoleon. The Royal Navy was the bulwark of British liberty, the sharpened edge of discovery and imperialism, the fluid economy where talented men could rise despite their birth, the deadly instrument of a Britannia that aspired to “rule the waves.” Its triumphs and failures were followed like sport in newspapers, periodicals, and Steel’s Navy list. Its greatest hero was given a king’s funeral and then immortalized on a column towering 170 feet above a London square named for his greatest—and fatal—victory: Trafalgar. (Frank Austen missed Trafalgar by a week—and regretted it for the rest of his life.) This course will ask what effect so rich a culture might have had on the fiction of the two preeminent women novelists of the long eighteenth century.

            To begin, we will address the Royal Navy itself as a military, social, and symbolic institution. In approaching Fanny Burney’s and Jane Austen’s connections to it, we will explore their relations with their brothers and then follow their brothers’ careers as examples of the conjunction of talent, connections, and luck needed for advancement. In reading the novels, we will attend simultaneously to Burney’s much discussed influence on Austen and to the many less discussed variations on naval life within their fictions. In Austen’s case, the Navy clearly had a profound effect on two novels, leading to the creation of William Price in Mansfield Park and to Captain Wentworth and his fellow officers in Persuasion. Burney’s Evelina presents a less exemplary naval character in the buffoonish Captain Mirvan, but the potential for new discovery is everywhere, as in Burney’s tongue and cheek announcement above: the coy triangulation of chronologers, zeniths, and islands reminds us that Cook’s voyage carried one of Kendall’s copies of Harrison’s famous chronometers, insuring that when the local sun was at its zenith the chronometer’s time—Greenwich mean time—would tell precisely how far the ship was from its British island home.

Texts: N.A.M. Rodger, The Wooden World; contemporary newspapers and periodicals; journals and histories of Cook’s second and third voyages; selections from Fanny Burney’s letters and journals; Austen, bThe Letters of Jane Austen; secondary and primary sources on the careers of James Burney, Frank Austen, and Charles Austen, including Jane Austen’s Sailor Brothers and Jane Austen and the Navy; selections from the life of Nelson; Burney, Evelina; Austen, juvenilia, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, Sanditon.

Films: The Bounty; Persuasion; Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World.

Requirements & Grading: Three position papers, 10% each (30%); correction memo, 10%; five page paper, 20%; prospectus and research paper, 40%.

E 363K • Classic To Romantic

35410 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 308
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will address the cultural shift away from neo-classical values that purportedly occurred in England (and in Europe and America) from the mid-eighteenth century through early nineteenth century. We will begin by reading the work of Pope, Johnson, and Reynolds in an attempt to define neo-classicism. We will spend a good deal of time discussing the emotionally-charged work of the “poets of sensibility” at mid-century and see what Jane Austen makes of the contrast between sense and sensibility in the novel of that name. We will then read the sensational gothic novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, contextualized with romantic poetry deriving from the gothic. Finally, we will survey the various “romanticisms” of Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Keats. 

Texts: Price, ed., Restoration and Eighteenth Century; Wolfson & Manning, eds., Longman Anthology of English Literature: The Romantics; Austen, Sense and Sensibility; M. Shelley, Frankenstein.

Requirements & Grading: Two 5-page essays, 25% each; three 2-page memos, 30%; one revision memo, 10%; participation, 10%.

E 363K • Classic To Romantic

35700 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 103
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will address the cultural shift away from neo-classical values that purportedly occurred in England (and in Europe and America) from the mid-eighteenth century through early nineteenth century. We will begin by reading the work of Pope, Johnson, and Reynolds in an attempt to define neo-classicism. We will spend a good deal of time discussing the emotionally-charged work of the “poets of sensibility” at mid-century and see what Jane Austen makes of the contrast between sense and sensibility in the novel of that name. We will then read two bizarre and sensational gothic novels, Matthew Lewis’s The Monk and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, interspersed with romantic poetry deriving from the gothic. Finally, we will survey the various “romanticisms” of Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Keats.

Texts: Price, ed., Restoration and Eighteenth Century; Austen, Sense and Sensibility; M. Lewis, The Monk; M. Shelley, Frankenstein; Course packet.

Requirements & Grading: Two 5-page essays, 25% each; three 2-page memos, 30%; one revision memo, 10; participation, 10%.

E 379M • Jane Austen

83145 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 105
show description

Course Description: Jane Austen may be the best-selling novelist of all time. She is one of the few authors whose work— 200 years after it was written—is regularly read for pleasure by a general audience. She is an author whose reputation has reached an apex among scholars. And she recently became something of a media star—230 years after her birth—because of the success of the many filmed adaptations of her work. This course will offer readings in four of Jane Austen’s canonical novels—Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Persuasion—as well as selections from the Juvenilia (i.e. her unpublished youthful writing) and her surviving letters. Significant attention will be paid to Austen's life and social environment and to past and current critical debates regarding her work. In addition, we will view some of the recent films and discuss their relation to the novels.

Texts:  Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion, selected letters and selected juvenilia.

Films: Sense and Sensibility (d. Ang Lee); Persuasion (d. Michell).

Grading: Three quizzes, 15% each = 45%; Two page position paper, 20%; Take home essay exam, 35%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.  

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 363K • Classic To Romantic-W

34925 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 204
show description

 

L. Bertelsen

 

Office hours: MTW: 2-3

E 363K; 24925

 

Office: PAR 314         

MWF 1-2

 

lberte@uts.cc.utexas.edu

PAR 204

 

 

363K. Classic to Romantic.

The theory and practice of Classicism in literature and other arts; the rise of the Romanticists in the eighteenth century. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Requirements, Assignments, Grading

     ¤ Readings: 

All readings must be completed by the day specified in the syllabus.  Each day I will give you a specific topic or issue to think about as you read the material for the next class.  You will be expected to be able to discuss this topic if called upon in class.  Intermittently the topics will be addressed in written form for a grade (see “memos”). 

     ¤ Memos: 

You will write 5 memos, and I will count the best 4.  Four of the memos (2 pp. typed) will be assigned as a means of addressing significant critical issues in advance of class discussion.  One memo (which will be required of all students) will take the form of revisions to the first paper (see below). Memos will be handed in at the end of the given class period.  Memos are graded on a 20 point scale. Late memos lose 5 points per day late.

     ¤ Essays:

You will write two essays (5 pp.), one at the midpoint and one at the end of the term.  These essays should be typewritten, double-spaced.  I will hand out representative topics when the time comes, but you are free to choose your own topic (clear it with me to be safe).  If you have a legitimate need for an extension, notify me beforehand.   Excuses after the fact usually won’t be accepted.  Papers will be graded on a 100 point scale. Late papers are accepted but will be penalized 10 points per day late. This is a substantial writing component class and requires a graded revision exercise.   This exercise will require selective revisions of your first paper along the lines suggested in my commentary and will count as a memo.  

     ¤ Grades

Four Memos (10% each), 40%; Two Essays (25% each), 50%; participation, 10%.  

Texts

Price, ed., The Restoration and the Eighteenth-Century
Longman Anthology of English Literature: The Romantics
Austen, Sense and Sensibility
Shelley, Frankenstein
online sources

N.B.

Students will have access to the course’s Blackboard site through UT Direct.
Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 603A • Comp And Reading In World Lit

34155 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 CRD 007A
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L. Bertelsen                             Office:  PAR 314
E 603 A; 34155                        Office hours:  TWTh 2-3
CRD 007A                                lberte@uts.cc.utexas.edu
TTh 9:30-11

Composition and Reading in World Literature. Reading of masterpieces of world literature and intensive training in writing and in critical analysis of literature. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Only one of the following may be counted: English 603A, Rhetoric and Writing 306, 306Q, Tutorial Course 603A; only one of the following may be counted: Comparative Literature 315, English 603B, 316K, Tutorial Course 603B. Prerequisite: For 603A, admission to the Plan II Honors Program; for 603B, English 603A.

Requirements and Assignments:

All readings must be completed by the day specified in the syllabus.  Sometimes I will give you a specific topic or issue to think about as you read the material for the next class.  You will be expected to be able to discuss this topic if called upon in class.  Intermittently the topics will be addressed in written form for a grade (see “memos”).  

     Student Teaching:

You will each be assigned to a three-person teaching group. This group will lead class discussion on a section of The Odyssey.  In preparation for teaching, you will need to meet as a group and decide on major issues, questions, and points of debate.  

     Memos:

You will write 5 memos, and I will count the best 4.  Three of the memos (2 pp. typed) will be assigned as a means of addressing significant critical issues in advance of class discussion. Another memo will take the form of a report to the class on the historical basis for a character, place, or event in H.M.S. Surprise.  The final memo will comprise revisions to the first essay. The latter two memos may not be dropped. Memos must be handed in at the end of the given class period. Memos are graded on a 20 point scale. Late memos lose 5 points per day late.

     Essays:

You will write two essays (5 pp.), one at the midpoint and one at the end of the term. The first will be peer edited prior to the final revision. These essays should be typewritten, double-spaced.  I will suggest the general subject area when the time comes, but you are free to choose your own topic (clear it with me to be safe). Papers will be graded on a 100 point scale. Late papers are accepted but will be penalized 10 points per day late.

     Grading Policy

Because participation contributes to the class grade, attendance is strongly encouraged. Plus/minus grades will be given, and determined on the following basis: Four Memos (10% each), 40%; Two Essays (25% each), 50%; Teaching, 10%.  I will add bonus participation points for the students who contribute the most to the class.

Required Texts and Viewings

  • Homer, The Odyssey
  • Shakespeare, The Tempest
  • Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
  • Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels
  • Voltaire, Candide
  • Patrick O’Brian, H.M.S. Surprise
  • Film: Master and Commander  (d. Peter Weir)

N.B.

Students will have access to the course’s Blackboard site through UT Direct.
Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full course syllabus.

UGS 302 • Representing War-W

64745 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 310
show description

L.Bertelsen                   Office: Parlin 314
UGS  302; 64745          Office Hours: TWTh 2-3
Parlin 310                     lberte@uts.cc.utexas.edu
TTH 12:30-2:00

RESTRICTED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS. SEMINAR CLASS FOCUSING ON A CONTEMPORARY ISSUE. DESIGNED TO INTRODUCE UNDERGRADUATES TO SCHOLARLY ANALYSIS FROM AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE. INCLUDES AN INTRODUCTION TO UNIVERSITY RESOURCES, SUCH AS RESEARCH FACILITIES, MUSEUMS, AND ATTENDANCE AT UNIVERSITY LECTURES OR PERFORMANCES AS ASSIGNED. MULTIPLE SECTIONS MAY BE OFFERED IN THE FALL AND SPRING WITH VARIOUS TOPICS AND INSTRUCTORS. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: TUTORIAL COURSE 301, 302, UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 302, 303. CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

SYLLABUS

Representing War: From Agincourt to the Pacific Theater

In this course, we will read various historical and literary works and view various visual media from the last 500 years in an attempt to understand better what happens when human beings try to represent warfare to an audience—or perhaps only to themselves.

Requirements and Assignments 

Memos: You will write 5 memos, and I will count the best 4.  Four of the memos (2 pp. typed) will be assigned as a means of addressing significant critical issues in advance of class discussion.  One memo (which will be required of all students) will take the form of revisions to the first paper (see below). Memos will be handed in at the end of the given class period.  Memos are graded on a 20 point scale. Late memos lose 5 points per day late.

Essays: You will write two essays (5 pp.), one at the midpoint and one at the end of the term.  These essays should be typewritten, double-spaced.  I will hand out representative topics when the time comes, but you are free to choose your own topic (clear it with me to be safe).  If you have a legitimate need for an extension, notify me beforehand.   Excuses after the fact usually won’t be accepted.  Papers will be graded on a 100 point scale. Late papers are accepted but will be penalized 10 points per day late. This is a substantial writing component class and requires a graded revision exercise.   This exercise will be a revision of your first paper along the lines suggested in my commentary.  The revision will count as a memo.

Oral Report:  You will each give a short oral report (2 pp. typed; 10 minutes for delivery and questions) on topics germane to our readings and viewings.

Grading Policy

Because participation contributes to the class grade, attendance is strongly encouraged. Plus/minus grades will be given, and determined on the following basis:  Four memos (10% each), 40%; Two essays (25% each), 50%; Oral report, 10%.  I will add bonus participation points for the students who contribute the most to the class.

 

Required Texts and Viewings

John Keegan, The Face of Battle

William Shakespeare, Henry V

Henry V (film; d. Kenneth Branagh)

Patrick O’Brian, H.M.S. Surprise

Master and Commander (film; d. Peter Weir)

E. M. Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front

Ernst Friedrich, War Against War (PCL reserves)

Selected poems from WWI (packet)

Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Ernie Pyle, “The Death of Captain Waskow” (packet)

The Battle of San Pietro (film; d. John Huston)

Lance Bertelsen, “San Pietro and the ‘Art’ of War”; “Icons on Iwo” (packet)

James Jones, The Thin Red Line

Joe Rosenthal, “Flag Raising, Iwo Jima” (packet)

The Best Years of Our Lives (film; d. William Wyler)

The Americanization of Emily (film; d. Arthur Hiller)

 

N.B.: Packets will be available at Jenn’s. Students will have access to the course’s Blackboard site through UT Direct.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full course syllabus.

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