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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Linda Ferreira-Buckley

Associate Professor Ph. D.

Contact

E 379R • Vic Fic & Condition Of England

36010 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 323
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Instructor:  Ferreira-Buckley, L

Unique #:  36010

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Independent Inquiry; Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This seminar examines how Victorian writers addressed pressing social, political, and aesthetic concerns in their work. Looking closely at a variety of fiction, nonfiction prose, and poetry, we will construct a lively sense of the historical period and its literary productions.

In so doing, we will confront and attempt to answer problematic questions that challenge literary scholars of all periods: How and why do we draw boundaries between periods? What are the benefits and dangers of doing so? How do the Victorians—and how do we—define “literature”? How do we decide what texts are “canonical”? What dangers are involved in generalizing about an author based on a small part of his or her work? How do scholars create a context out of which to understand a work? We should find our investigations a compelling way to be self-reflexive about our own critical theories and practices.

We will become familiar with nineteenth-century British materials housed in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and study the methodologies that scholars use in making use of such resources. Students are encouraged to work with archival materials available on this campus.

By the end of the semester, we should emerge as better writers and critical readers who are conversant with a range of scholarly practices. We should also emerge with an engagement with and appreciation for the literature of the period.

Texts: Carlyle, Past and Present; Dickens, Hard Times; Eliot, Silas Marner; Arnold, “Function of Criticism at the Present Time”; Mary Prince, The History of Mary Prince; Carlyle, The Nigger Question; Pater, Renaissance; Poetry of writers such as Christina Rossetti, Kipling, Barrett Browning.

Requirements & Grading: For the major project, each student will write a senior paper (40%). The writer will work closely with the instructor to settle on a topic that he or she finds engaging and challenging. The writer should be prepared to work through drafts of the paper to develop and sharpen its argument and to refine its style. To build expertise, students will keep a research journal and will compose a preliminary proposal, a finished proposal and a working plan (5%), a book review (10%), a literature review (10%), and an abstract of their argument (5%). Students will also take a midterm (15%) and a final exam (15%).  Attendance required.

E 387R • Writ Outside Acad, 18th-19th C

36275 • Spring 2014
Meets W 600pm-900pm CAL 200
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Rhetoric Outside the Academy in the 18th, 19th, & 20th Centuries

This seminar focuses on the ways that the rhetorical practices of reading, writing, and speaking have been studied outside of traditional classrooms.

The aim is not to map out a chronological or comprehensive history but rather to investigate practices and sites of significance that represent the diversity and complexity of rhetorical education: debating societies, literary circles and salons, speaking societies, libraries, writing groups, and letter writing manuals, etc.

In reading histories of what David Gold terms “competing and complementary rhetorical traditions,” we will examine not only what was studied and practiced and for what end but how each developed to meet the real or imagined needs of particular people. Equally important, we will examine and evaluate the basis for the conclusions each scholar draws.  We will also work through readings in research methodologies, with special attention to working with archival materials.

Although most course readings focus on the nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries, participants are encouraged to design projects that investigate practices in a period and place related to their own research program in rhetoric or literary studies.   Whether their primary interest is in rhetoric and writing, in “literary” studies, in communication studies, in classics, or in education more generally, participants should find our investigations relevant.

For the major project, each seminar member will work with the instructor  to design and complete a scholarly project.  Sequenced exercises and assignments are designed both to familiarize participants with scholarly genres and to develop his or her particular project. Members will complete a book review (10%), a conference proposal (10%), a literature review (20%), and, finally, a paper suitable for submission to a journal or for presentation at a conference (60%).  During the semester, we will look carefully at each of these genres to identify disciplinary conventions.

Readings (not finalized)

McHenry, Forgotten Readers: Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies (2002)

Miller et al,  Rhetorical Women: Roles and Representations (2006), excerpts

Ramsey, Sharer, L’Eplattenier, and Mastrangelo, Working in the Archives (2009)

Ronald and  Ritchie, Teaching Rhetorica: Theory, Pedagogy, Practice (2006), excerpts

Royster and Kirsch, “Re-visioning History, Theory, and Practice” & “Conclusion,” Feminist Rhetorical Practices: New Horizons for Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies (2012)

Royster, Traces Of A Stream: Literacy and Social Change Among African American Women (2002), excerpts

Ulman, Minutes of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society  (1990), excerpts

E 379R • Women In 19th-Cen Brit Novel

36050 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 323
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Instructor:  Ferreira-Buckley, L            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  36050            Flags:  Independent Inquiry; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: How are women depicted in nineteenth-century British novels, and what do those depictions reveal about their authors’ social, political, religious, and aesthetic concerns? By what means do these authors construct gender? What kinds of historical research provide insight into these novels? These and similar questions will ground our work as we construct a lively sense of both the novels we’ll read and of the types of research scholars conduct to open up literary texts.

            As we do so, we will also confront and attempt to answer some of the questions that challenge literary scholars of all periods. How do different theoretical lenses change what readers get from texts? What dangers are involved in over-generalizing about a period’s novels? Our investigations will engage us in a range of scholarly practices and should compel us to be self-reflexive about our own interpretive practices.

            The class will primarily consist of intensive discussions based on our reading and your research projects, but the instructor will occasionally offer brief lectures. Discussions and activities will prepare students to propose, design, conduct, and complete a research project. Students will also participate in ongoing conversations in their small research groups, and each group will make a presentation to the class. Students will of course revise their work several times based on their own reviews and on feedback from their peers and instructor.

            In addition to using resources available in the PCL and online, we will also work with nineteenth-century British materials housed in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center to study the methodologies archival scholars use. Although all students will complete a research exercise there, some students may choose to design their major project around archival materials.

            By the end of the semester, students should emerge with a robust engagement with nineteenth-century British novels; they should also emerge more confident in their ability to read, write, and speak critically about their own and others’ inquiries into the nineteenth-century British novel.

Texts: We will read six of the following novels: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; C. Bronte, Villette; Eliot, Middlemarch; Gaskell, North and South; Gissing, The Odd Women; Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles; Meredith, Amazing Marriage; Stoker, Dracula.

Requirements & Grading: 2-page project proposal & written project updates: 5%; annotated bibliography: 5%; research paper: 70%; research journal: 10%; collaborative presentation: 10%. Research exercises, peer reviews, class attendance & participation are all mandatory to pass course.

E 375L • Victorian Literature

35645 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.102
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Instructor:  MacDuffie, E            Areas:  II / F

Unique #:  35645            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will study a number of major works of prose and poetry from the Victorian era.  We will pay close attention to the scientific background of the period, and discuss the way in which debates about evolutionary biology, prompted by the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species, helped shape the thematic and formal concerns of a number of Victorian writers.

Texts: Authors include George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, Matthew Arnold, Robert Browning, H.G. Wells, and Joseph Conrad.

Requirements & Grading: Class participation and in-class writing assignments, 20%; 4-5-page essay, 20%; 6-7-page essay, 25%; 8-9-page essay, 35%.s

E 379R • Women In 19th-Cen Brit Novel

35560 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 323
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Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: How are women depicted in nineteenth-century British novels, and what do those depictions reveal about their authors’ social, political, religious, and aesthetic concerns? By what means do these authors construct gender? What kinds of historical research provide insight into these novels? These and similar questions will ground our work as we construct a lively sense of both the novels we’ll read and of the types of research scholars conduct to open up literary texts.

            As we do so, we will also confront and attempt to answer some of the questions that challenge literary scholars of all periods. How do different theoretical lenses change what readers get from texts? What dangers are involved in over-generalizing about a period’s novels? Our investigations will engage us in a range of scholarly practices and should compel us to be self-reflexive about our own interpretive practices.

            The class will primarily consist of intensive discussions based on our reading and your research projects, but the instructor will occasionally offer brief lectures. Discussions and activities will prepare students to propose, design, conduct, and complete a research project. Students will also participate in ongoing conversations in their small research groups, and each group will make a presentation to the class. Students will of course revise their work several times based on their own reviews and on feedback from their peers and instructor.

            In addition to using resources available in the PCL and online, we will also work with nineteenth-century British materials housed in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center to study the methodologies archival scholars use. Although all students will complete a research exercise there, some students may choose to design their major project around archival materials.

            By the end of the semester, students should emerge with a robust engagement with nineteenth-century British novels; they should also emerge more confident in their ability to read, write, and speak critically about their own and others’ inquiries into the nineteenth-century British novel. 

Texts: We will read seven of the following novels: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; C. Bronte, The Professor or Villette; Eliot, Middlemarch; Gaskell, Wives and Daughters; Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles; Meredith, Amazing Marriage; M. Shelley, Frankenstein; Stoker, Dracula; Wollstonecraft, Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman.

Requirements & Grading: 2-page project proposal & written project updates: 5%; annotated bibliography: 5%; research paper: 70%; research journal: 10%; collaborative presentation: 10%. Research exercises, peer reviews, class attendance & participation are all mandatory to pass course.

E 375L • Victorian Literature

35773 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 204
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Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: This class will examine how Victorian writers addressed pressing social, political, and aesthetic concerns for specific audiences (which includes considering varying and sometimes conflicting notions of “the public”). Looking closely at a range of fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction prose, we will construct a lively sense of the historical period and its productions.

As we do so, we will also confront and attempt to answer questions that challenge literary scholars of all periods: How do scholars create a context in which to understand a particular text? How do different theoretical lenses change what readers get from texts? How and why do we draw boundaries between historical periods, and what are the benefits and dangers of doing so? How do the Victorians – and how do we – define “literature”? How do we decide what texts are “canonical”? What dangers are involved in generalizing about an author based on a small part of his or her work? Our investigations should compel us to be self-reflexive about our own reading practices.

We will also work with nineteenth-century British materials housed in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and study the methodologies archival scholars use.  Students may choose to design their projects around archival materials.

By the end of the semester, we should emerge with a robust engagement with the literary texts of the Victorian period and as more confident critical readers and writers conversant with a range of scholarly practices and genres.

Texts (tentative): Carlyle, Past and Present (excerpts); Dickens, Hard Times; Eliot, Middlemarch, Silas Marner; Arnold, “Function of Criticism at the Present Time”; Pater, Renaissance (excerpts); Mary Prince, The History of Mary Prince; Carlyle, The Nigger Question; Mill, “The Negro Question”; Nightingale, Cassandra; Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Shaw, Pygmalion; Poetry of Barrett Browning, Browning, C. Rossetti, Tennyson, and others.

Grading: Three papers, all to be revised: 20% each, 60% total; Collaborative project 10%; Midterm exam 15%; Final exam 15%; Exercises, peer reviews, class attendance & participation: mandatory. Plus/Minus grading.

E 375L • Victorian Literature

34875 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 303
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Course Description: This class will examine how Victorian writers addressed pressing social, political, and aesthetic concerns for specific audiences (which includes considering varying and sometimes conflicting notions of “the public”). Looking closely at a range of fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction prose, we will construct a lively sense of the historical period and its productions. As we do so, we will also confront and attempt to answer questions that challenge literary scholars of all periods: How do scholars create a context in which to understand a particular text? How do different theoretical lenses change what readers get from texts? How and why do we draw boundaries between historical periods, and what are the benefits and dangers of doing so? How do the Victorians – and how do we – define “literature”? How do we decide what texts are “canonical”? What dangers are involved in generalizing about an author based on a small part of his or her work? Our investigations should compel us to be self-reflexive about our own reading practices. We will also work with nineteenth-century British materials housed in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and study the methodologies archival scholars use.  Students may choose to design their projects around archival materials. By the end of the semester, we should emerge with a robust engagement with the literary texts of the Victorian period and as more confident critical readers and writers conversant with a range of scholarly practices and genres.

Texts (tentative): Carlyle, Past and Present (excerpts); Dickens, Hard Times; Eliot, Middlemarch, Silas Marner; Arnold, “Function of Criticism at the Present Time”; Pater, Renaissance (excerpts); Mary Prince, The History of Mary Prince; Carlyle, The Nigger Question; Mill, “The Negro Question”; Nightingale, Cassandra; Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Shaw, Pygmalion; Poetry of Barrett Browning, Browning, C. Rossetti, Tennyson, and others.

Grading: Three papers, all to be revised: 20% each, 60% total; Collaborative project 10%; Midterm exam 15%; Final exam 15%; Exercises, peer reviews, class attendance & participation: mandatory. Writing Flag, Plus/Minus grading.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

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