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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Lars Hinrichs

Assistant Professor Ph.D., 2006, University of Freiburg

Lars Hinrichs

Contact

Biography

Lars Hinrichs is a linguist interested in varieties of English. For his dissertation work at the University of Freiburg, he studied the use of English and Creole in online communication by Jamaicans. He has also researched syntactic differences between British and American written English from a statistical perspective. Since joining the UT English department in 2007, he has been directing the Texas English Project, which researches the different kinds of English spoken in Texas.

Interests

Sociolinguistics; anthropological linguistics; corpus linguistics, Pidgins and Creoles; computer-mediated communication.

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83370 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am PAR 301
(also listed as C L S315 )
show description

Instructor:  Hinrichs, L

Unique #:  83370

Semester:  Summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is an introduction to the systematic study of literature. The selections focus on masterworks of literature since the Middle Ages. Students will learn how to read a literary text as an (a) artifact that (b) reflects the historical, social, and cultural circumstances of its production. Consequently, lectures will introduce basic concepts from critical theory and rhetorical analysis, and apply these to the readings. We will also discuss, for each work, its historical background and how our knowledge of a text and its context can inform each other. Discussions and assignments are designed to sharpen critical skills and focus on practical exercises in interpretation.

Texts: Simon, P. (ed.). 2009. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter Second Edition. New York: W.W. Norton. (Paperback edition in 2 volumes, ISBN 978-0-393-93303-1.) Required.

Goethe, J. W. (1774[1970]). The Sufferings of Young Werther. Transl. H. Steinhauer. New York: W.W. Norton. (ISBN 0-393-09880-X.) Required.

Requirements & Grading: The final grade will be composed of the following parts: Midterm exam, 35%; Final exam, 35%; Quizzes, 18%; Classroom participation, 12%.

E 323L • English As A World Language

35860 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 112
(also listed as LIN 323L )
show description

Instructor:  Hinrichs, L

Unique #:  35860

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 323L

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the different 'Englishes' that are spoken around the world: major standard varieties such as British and American English, emerging standard varieties such as those found in many postcolonial societies, and second-language varieties such as those of continental Europe and other parts of the world where English is not a first or official language. The course will begin with a historical overview of the causes of the spread of English throughout the world and its rise to world language status. We will then look at a number of different varieties of English in detail, using real language data and attempting to describe them in terms of their structure and their social context.

Texts: Readings for the course will be made available in a reader, details TBA.

Requirements & Grading: There will be two exams: mid-term (30%) and final (40%). In addition, students will be required to submit one 8-10-page essay about one variety of English (20%). The remaining 10% of the grade will be given for attendance and class participation.

E 324 • Linguistics For Readers

35870 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 350 )
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Instructor:  Hinrichs, L

Unique #:  35870

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: This course offers an introduction to language-based approaches to literature. Taught by a linguist and directed at literature majors and beginning graduate students, its goal is to enhance close reading through skills in the responsible analysis of the material side of literary language.

The semester schedule is divided into seven sections:

(1) Introduction: the materiality of language.

(2) Core linguistics: syntax and phonetics.

(3) Linguistic theories of metaphor.

(4) Speech act theory: the foundations of performativity.

(5) Social variation, individual styles, and heteroglossia.

(6) Prosody and rhetorical tropes.

(7) Linguistic form and the aesthetics of realism.

Texts: Readings will be provided in a reader, available at the Co-op bookstore.

Requirements & Grading: Students who participate will be required to complete reading assignments (literary and theoretical texts) for each class session. Active participation in class discussions and team assignments is required. The total grade consists of the following components: Three essays (between 3 and 6 pp. each), 55%; Final exam, 30%; In-class participation (including occasional quizzes), 15%.

E 388M • Comp-Mediated Discourse: Data

36095 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 419
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Studying Computer-Mediated Discourse: Data, Methods, Applications

The language used in computer-mediated communication -- more compactly referred to as computer-mediated discourse -- has been the object of linguistic and rhetorical study for more than two decades. This course will take stock of the various interests, methods, and uses that have evolved in this (comparatively) new object of study.

Thematic foci of the course include the following: multilingualism, performance and performativity, verbal play, and orthographic variation (all of these in online discourse). Among the analytical methods of particular interest are: statistical analysis of variation in linguistic features, discourse analysis, online ethnography, conversation analysis, and narrative analysis.

In their own, original work for this course, students will trace the full trajectory of a discourse-oriented research project from data compilation and corpus creation via the formulation of an up-to-date research question and the selection of (an) appropriate method(s) to the presentation and write-up of their findings.

While familiarity with computer programming or scripting languages would be useful, it is by no means required. Tutorials in the Python scripting language may be offered if the number of students interested reaches a critical mass.

Readings:

  • Androutsopoulos, Jannis and Michael Beisswenger (eds.) 2008. Data and methods in computer-mediated discourse analysis. Special issue of Language @ Internet. Vol. 5. http://www.languageatinternet.org/articles/2008
  • Thurlow, Crispin & Kristine Mroczek (eds.). 2011. Digital discourse: language in the new media. (Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics). Oxford: Oxford UP.
  • Additional papers provided through the course website.

 

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83513 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm RLM 6.124
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Instructor:  Hinrichs, L            Areas:  --/ B

Unique #:  83513            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is an introduction to the systematic study of literature. The selections focus on masterworks of literature since the Middle Ages. Students will learn how to read a literary text as an (a) artifact that (b) reflects the historical, social, and cultural circumstances of its production. Consequently, lectures will introduce basic concepts from critical theory and rhetorical analysis, and apply these to the readings. We will also discuss, for each work, its historical background and how our knowledge of a text and its context can inform each other. Discussions and assignments are designed to sharpen critical skills and focus on practical exercises in interpretation.

Texts: Simon, P. (ed.). 2009. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter Second Edition. New York: W.W. Norton. (Paperback edition in 2 volumes, ISBN 978-0-393-93303-1.) Required.

Goethe, J. W. (1774[1970]). The Sufferings of Young Werther. Transl. H. Steinhauer. New York: W.W. Norton. (ISBN 0-393-09880-X.) Required.

Requirements & Grading: The final grade will be composed of the following parts: Midterm exam, 35%; Final exam, 35%; Quizzes, 18%; Classroom participation, 12%.

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83720 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BEN 1.122
show description

Instructor:  Hinrichs, L            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  83720            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is an introduction to the systematic study of literature. The selections focus on masterworks of literature since the Middle Ages. Students will learn how to read a literary text as an (a) artifact that (b) reflects the historical, social, and cultural circumstances of its production. Consequently, lectures will introduce basic concepts from critical theory and rhetorical analysis, and apply these to the readings. We will also discuss, for each work, its historical background and how our knowledge of a text and its context can inform each other. Discussions and assignments are designed to sharpen critical skills and focus on practical exercises in interpretation.

Texts: Simon, P. (ed.). 2009. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter Second Edition. New York: W.W. Norton. (Paperback edition in 2 volumes, ISBN 978-0-393-93303-1.) Required.

Goethe, J. W. (1774[1970]). The Sufferings of Young Werther. Transl. H. Steinhauer. New York: W.W. Norton. (ISBN 0-393-09880-X.) Required.

Requirements & Grading: The final grade will be composed of the following parts: Midterm exam, 35%; Final exam, 35%; Quizzes, 18%; Classroom participation, 12%.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

35267 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 214
(also listed as C L 315 )
show description

Instructor:  Hinrichs, L            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35267            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is an introduction to the systematic study of literature. The selections focus on masterworks of literature since the Middle Ages. Students will learn how to read a literary text as an (a) artifact that (b) reflects the historical, social, and cultural circumstances of its production. Consequently, lectures will introduce basic concepts from critical theory and rhetorical analysis, and apply these to the readings. We will also discuss, for each work, its historical background and how our knowledge of a text and its context can inform each other. Discussions and assignments are designed to sharpen critical skills and focus on practical exercises in interpretation.

Texts: Simon, P. (ed.). 2009. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter Second Edition. New York: W.W. Norton. (Paperback edition in 2 volumes, ISBN 978-0-393-93303-1.) Required.

Goethe, J. W. (1774[1970]). The Sufferings of Young Werther. Transl. H. Steinhauer. New York: W.W. Norton. (ISBN 0-393-09880-X.) Required.

Requirements & Grading: The final grade will be composed of the following parts: Midterm exam, 22%; Final exam, 23%; Writing assignments, 25%; Quizzes, 20%; Classroom participation, 10%.

E 323L • English As A World Language

35325 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm JES A209A
(also listed as LIN 323L )
show description

Instructor:  Hinrichs, L            Areas:  IV / G

Unique #:  35325            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LIN 323L            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the different 'Englishes' that are spoken around the world: major standard varieties such as British and American English, emerging standard varieties such as those found in many postcolonial societies, and second-language varieties such as those of continental Europe and other parts of the world where English is not a first or official language. The course will begin with a historical overview of the causes of the spread of English throughout the world and its rise to world language status. We will then look at a number of different varieties of English in detail, using real language data and attempting to describe them in terms of their structure and their social context.

Texts: Readings for the course will be made available in a reader, details TBA.

Requirements & Grading: There will be two exams: mid-term (30%) and final (40%). In addition, students will be required to submit one 8-10-page essay about one variety of English (20%). The remaining 10% of the grade will be given for attendance and class participation.

E 321L • American English

35160 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 105
(also listed as LIN 321L )
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Course Description: We will begin by looking at the development of American English since colonial times. The major part of the course will be devoted to different varieties of English in the U.S. and Canada. We will consider linguistic variation according to factors such as region, social status, and ethnicity, as well as individual speech style. Students will be asked to perform their own case studies of Texas English.

 Texts: The basic text for the course will be Introducing Sociolinguistics by Miriam Meyerhoff (London/New York: Routledge, 2006). Additional readings will be made available electronically.

 Grading: There will be a final exam (30%) and one midterm exam (20%). In addition, students will be asked to present an oral report on their own research and fieldwork on one variety of American English, and to produce a written version of this report of at least six pages (40%). The remaining 10% of the grade will be given for attendance and class participation.

 Computer Instruction?  No

 Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. No exceptions.

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83540 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 210
show description

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

 

Description: This course is an introduction to the systematic study of literature. The selections focus on masterworks of literature since the Middle Ages. Students will learn how to read a literary text as an (a) artifact that (b) reflects the historical, social, and cultural circumstances of its production. Consequently, lectures will introduce basic concepts from critical theory and rhetorical analysis, and apply these to the readings. We will also discuss, for each work, its historical background and how our knowledge of a text and its context can inform each other. Discussions and assignments are designed to sharpen critical skills and focus on practical exercises in interpretation.

 

Texts: Simon, P. (ed.). 2009. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter Second Edition. New York: W.W. Norton. (Paperback edition in 2 volumes, ISBN 978-0-393-93303-1.) Required.

 

Goethe, J. W. (1774[1970]). The Sufferings of Young Werther. Transl. H. Steinhauer. New York: W.W. Norton. (ISBN 0-393-09880-X.) Required.

 

Requirements & Grading: The final grade will be composed of the following parts: Midterm exam, 22%; Final exam, 23%; Writing assignments, 25%; Quizzes, 20%; Classroom participation, 10%.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

83032 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 101
show description

Instructor:  Hinrichs, L
Unique #:  83032
Semester:  Summer 1 2010
Cross-lists:  NA
Areas:  IV
Flags:  NA
Restrictions:  None
Computer Instruction:  Y/N

Prerequisites:  Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including English 603A, Rhetoric and Writing 306, 306Q, or Tutorial Course 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description:  This course is an introduction to the systematic study of literature. The selections focus on masterworks of Western literature since the Middle Ages. Students will learn how to read a literary text as an (a) artifact that (b) reflects the historical, social, and cultural circumstances of its production. Consequently, lectures will introduce basic concepts from critical theory and rhetorical analysis, and apply these to the readings. We will also discuss, for each work, its historical background and how our knowledge of a text and its context can inform each other. Discussions and assignments are designed to sharpen critical skills and focus on practical exercises in interpretation.

Texts: 

  • Simon, P. (ed.). 2009. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter Second Edition. New York: W.W. Norton. (Paperback edition in 2 volumes, ISBN 978-0-393-93303-1.) Required.
  • Goethe, J. W. (1774[1970]). The Sufferings of Young Werther. Transl. H. Steinhauer. New York: W.W. Norton. (ISBN 0-393-09880-X.) Required.

Requirements & Grading:  The final grade will be composed of the following parts:

  • Weekly tests                     30%
  • Final exam                        35%
  • RAPs                                15%
  • Pop quizzes                      10%
  • Classroom participation      10%

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 321L • American English

34675 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 105
show description

Spring 2010, American English, TTH 12:30-2, PAR 105

Course Description

We will begin by looking at the development of American English since colonial times. The major part of the course will be devoted to different varieties of English in the U.S. and Canada. We will consider linguistic variation according to factors such as region, social status, ethnicity, age, and gender. Students will be asked to perform their own case studies of a variety of English spoken in Texas.

Grading Policy

There will be a final exam (30%) and one in-class quiz per week (20%). In addition, students will be asked to present an oral report on their own research and fieldwork on one variety of American English, and to produce a written version of this report of at least six pages (40%). The remaining 10% of the grade will be given for attendance and class participation.

Texts

The basic text for the course will be American English by Wolfram and Schilling-Estes (second edition, Oxford/Malden: Blackwell, 2005). Additional readings will be made available electronically.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

Publications

Bullock, B., Hinrichs, L. and Toribio, A.J. (submitted). "World Englishes, code-switching, and convergence." In M. Filppula, J. Klemola, and D. Sharma (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of World Englishes. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Hinrichs, L. and White-Sustaíta, J. 2011. "Global Englishes and the sociolinguistics of spelling:
A study of Jamaican blog and e-mail writing."
English World-Wide 32:1, 46-73.

Hinrichs, L. and Farquharson, J.T. (eds., 2011) Variation in the Caribbean: From Creole Continua to Individual Agency. Amsterdam: John Benjamins (Creole Language Library, 37).

Hinrichs, L., Smith, N. and Waibel, B. (2010). "A manual of information for the part-of-speech-tagged 'Brown' corpora." ICAME Journal 34, 189-230.

Hinrichs, L. and Szmrecsanyi, B. (2007). "Recent changes in the function and frequency of Standard English genitive constructions: a multivariate analysis of tagged corpora." English Language and Linguistics 11:3, 437-474.

Hinrichs, L. (2006) Codeswitching on the Web: English and Jamaican Creole in E-Mail Communication.  Amsterdam: John Benjamins (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series, 147).

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