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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Mark Garrett Longaker

Associate Professor Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University

Associate Chair, Department of Rhetoric and Writing

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Biography

Mark Longaker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing, and in the English Department and Communication Studies.

E 387M • Marxism In Rhet/Cul & Lit Thry

35050 • Spring 2015
Meets TH 500pm-800pm PAR 104
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Marxian theory and politics have been repeatedly derided as a dead letter, continually consigned to the "dustbin of history." (This is Leon Trotsky's phrase, later repeated by capitalist apologists like Francis Fukuyama and Tom Brokaw, apparently with neither cognizance of nor ironic reference to its author.) Yet Marxism keeps appearing as a ground for various theoretical and political projects, particularly among humanities scholars in rhetorical, cultural, and literary studies. This seminar will explore the persistent themes of Marxian politics and theory as well as the various efforts to build on, utilize, alter, and mobilize the Marxian tradition. We will assume that there is no one Marxism, but rather a lengthy conversation whose beginning happens to coincide with and rely heavily on the writings of one thinker—Karl Marx.  Working from that assumption, we will traipse through several intellectual threads and the writings of many people including but not limited to: Public-Sphere Theory (Jurgen Habermas, Michael Warner, Jodi Dean), Humanism (Herbert Marcuse, Terry Eagleton), Cultural Studies (Antonio Gramsci, Lawrence Grossberg, Michael Berube, Ann Cvetkovich, Simon During), Postcolonial Theory (Edward Said, Etiene Balibar), Posthumanism (Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Antonio Negri, Franco Berardi, Alain Badiou, Slovoj Zizek), and Critical Pedagogy (Paolo Freire, Ira Shor, Henry Giroux).  While engaging the Marxian tradition, we will assume, as Marx did, that the purpose of intellectual labor is political action—not to interpret the world but to change it.  Specifically, we will examine the applicability and effects of Marxism in three disciplinary realms: rhetoric, culture, and literature. We will also examine what Marx would call “praxis,” the pragmatic-political work that one engages by simply being part of a social formation. In rhetorical, cultural, and literary studies, the question of praxis brings us to the methods of analysis—how does Marxism encourage us to look at a variety of texts, and what political work does that (do these) mode(s) of analysis perform in a specific moment of history?

Assignments:

Students will be responsible for writing: A summary of a book, placing the text in conversation with the reading that the rest of the class must complete, and relating the text to the Marxian tradition as a whole.  A summary of an article also placing the text in conversation with the reading that the rest of the class must complete, and relating the text to the Marxian tradition as a whole.  An independent project (such as a conference or seminar paper) that engages or applies Marxism in some fashion.

E 387R • Enlightenment Rhetoric

35790 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 500pm-800pm PAR 104
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Enlightenment Rhetoric

This course will explore the Enlightenment on the Continent as well as in Great Britain with attention to three themes: epistemology, sovereignty, and toleration.  The primary reading in the course will include works by: Francis Bacon, Renee Descartes, David Hume, Giambattista Vico, Thomas Hobbes, Baruch Spinoza, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, James Madison, John Locke, and Anthony Ashley Third Earl of Shaftesbury.  In addition to this primary reading, we will read rhetorical and linguistic theories from the 17th and 18th centuries. Furthermore, we will read contemporary histories of the era and contemporary critical theory that takes up Enlightenment themes.  The philosophical, rhetorical, historical, and contemporary critical work will all be brought to bear on three questions: Was there really a transcontinental Enlightenment or just a series of related and/or concomitant historical events?  Was the Enlightenment hostile and/or friendly towards rhetoric?  (Why) Does the Enlightenment matter to present-day philosophy, rhetoric, and historiography?  Students will be responsible for weekly reading (roughly 100pp. of somewhat dense Enlightenment philosophy).  They will also each read and write summaries of: a "primary" work of philosophy; a work of Enlightenment rhetoric or linguistics; a contemporary history; a selection of contemporary critical theory.   In sum, each student's work will consist of: reading and in-class discussion; participating in a weekly online forum  (leading the online discussion at least once and participating for the remaining weeks); writing four summaries for in-class presentation and other students' use.  Students interested in writing a longer work (such as a seminar paper, conference presentation, or academic article) may do so with instructor guidance, but this will remain optional and largely out-of-class work.  Finally, as is the case in my previous graduate seminars, we will spend sometime each week talking about the workaday and often unmentioned labor of U.S. academia -- such as submitting articles, pacing scholarly output to meet tenure requirements, putting together conference panel proposals, researching and revising scholarly work, preparing for tenure, and any other topic of interest to the particular students in the seminar.

E 398T • Supervised Teaching In English

35140 • Fall 2010
Meets F 1100am-200pm PAR 302
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E 398T is a course in writing theory and pedagogy developed specifically for new instructors of RHE 306. It begins with a three-day workshop in August before classes start and follows with a semester-long colloquium.  Fall 2010 appointment as an Assistant Instructor required.

Requirements

Attendance and satisfactory performance in the August Workshop and colloquium are conditions of employment.

E 398T • Supervised Teaching In English

35145 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 6
show description

E 398T is a course in writing theory and pedagogy developed specifically for new instructors of RHE 306. It begins with a three-day workshop in August before classes start and follows with a semester-long colloquium.  Fall 2010 appointment as an Assistant Instructor required.

Requirements

Attendance and satisfactory performance in the August Workshop and colloquium are conditions of employment.

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