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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Phillip J Barrish

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1991, Cornell University

Phillip J Barrish

Contact

Biography

Phillip Barrish is the author of American Literary Realism, Critical Theory, and Intellectual Prestige, 1880-1995 (Cambridge UP, 2001), White Liberal Identity, Literary Pedagogy, and Classic American Realism (Ohio State UP, 2005), and The Cambridge Introduction to American Literary Realism (Cambridge UP, 2011). His current research explores fictional representations of health-care systems in the United States from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

 

Interests

American literature 1870-1930; medicine and literature; gender studies; "masculinity" as a cultural construction; whiteness studies; relationship between literature and liberalism.

E 316M • American Literature

35405 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 1.146
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Instructor:  Barrish, P

Unique #:  35405

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is designed not only to increase your knowledge and appreciation of American literature but also to improve your skills as an attentively close reader, a critical thinker, and an analytic writer. We will focus on reading literary works in relation to their social and historical contexts, as well as on questions of literary language and form. Students will do a substantial amount of writing at home as well as in class.

Texts: Among others, authors studied will probably include Anne Bradstreet, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Kate Chopin, Ernest Hemingway, and Sandra Cisneros. Students will buy a course packet as well as a few individual editions of longer works.

Note: Students who do not already own an I-Clicker will be required to obtain one.

Requirements & Grading: Four at-home CRIT exercises. (CRIT is an online application that requires students to perform the following five steps in relation to a literary text: Paraphrase, Observe, Contextualize, Analyze, Argue.) Three 2-page critical essays. Two CRIT exercises in class in exam format. Reading quizzes. Participation and small group work in class. Punctual attendance at all lectures and discussion sections. I enforce a strict no-screens policy in class—including phones, tablets, and laptops.

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

83140 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am PAR 201
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Instructor:  Barrish, P

Unique #:  83140

Semester:  Summer 2014, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course is designed not only to increase your knowledge and appreciation of American literature but also to improve your skills as an attentive close reader, a critical thinker, and an analytic writer. We will read literary works in relation to their social and historical contexts and focus closely on language and form. Among others, authors studied will probably include Anne Bradstreet, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Kate Chopin, Ernest Hemingway, and Sandra Cisneros.

Texts: Students will purchase a course packet as well as a few individual editions.

Note: Students who do not already own an I-Clicker will be required to obtain one for the class.

Requirements & Grading: Reading quizzes and brief writing assignments; in which you respond to what you have read; Three in-class examinations; Participation and other in-class activities; Punctual attendance at all lectures and discussions. Please note that I enforce a strict no-screens policy in class—including phones, tablets, and laptops.

E 395M • American Realism

36355 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm CAL 200
show description

American Literary Realism

Literary realism became a salient feature on the U.S. literary scene in the decades following the Civil War (1861-65). From the mid-1880s until the advent of modernism in the initial decades of the twentieth century, realism represented the most culturally prestigious (though not necessarily the best-selling) form of American fiction. Scholar Stanley Corkin has identified this same period with “the birth of the modern United States” – the time when a great many of the economic structures, cultural forms, and social and political and conflicts, as well as modes of everyday life, that we think of as characteristic of modern American life first took shape. Our course will explore realism and works associated with it from historical, formal, cultural, theoretical, and pedagogical perspectives.  Among other axes of meaning and effect, we will pay attention to questions involving gender, race, ethnicity, and class; professionalism and the middle-class identity; speech and “manners”; style and narrative structure; and region and nation.

Primary authors we will almost certainly be reading include (in alphabetical order) Charles Chesnutt, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, William Dean Howells, Henry James, Sarah Orne Jewett, Mark Twain, and Edith Wharton. Possible other primary authors include Abraham Cahan, Sui Sin Far, John W. DeForest, Jacob Riis, and Booker T. Washington.

Likely suspects for secondary sources include, among others, Gail Bederman, Nancy Bentley, Richard Brodhead, Nancy Glazener, Amy Kaplan, Walter Benn Michaels, and Kenneth Warren.

Grading will be based on:

  • A 3-5 page close-reading based paper
  • An in-class presentation that also includes a substantial bibliography
  • A conference-length paper (8-12 pages)
  • Attendance and classroom engagement throughout the semester

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

35225-35270 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm FAC 21
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Instructor:  Barrish, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  35225-35270            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History --

This course is designed not only to increase your knowledge and appreciation of American literature but also to improve your skills as an attentively close reader, a critical thinker, and an analytic writer. We will focus on reading literary works in relation to their social and historical contexts, as well as on questions of literary language and form.

Texts:

1) The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Shorter Eighth Edition. Volumes 1 and 2

2) Kate Chopin, The Awakening, Norton Critical Edition. [Please note: If you purchase the Norton Anthology at the University Coop, you will receive a free copy of The Awakening bundled with it.]

3) E316K Course Packet (Barrish)

4) Note: Students who do not already own an I-Clicker will be required to purchase or rent one.

Requirements & Grading: Reading quizzes and brief writing assignments in which you respond to what you have read; Participation and other in-class activities; One midterm and one final examination; Punctual attendance at all lectures and discussion sections.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34840-34885 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WCH 1.120
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Instructor:  Barrish, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  34840-34845            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A; and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History --

This course surveys nearly four hundred years of American literature. We will concentrate on relating the diverse "voices" of American literature to one another and to the social and historical contexts appropriate to each, as well as on questions of literary form.

Texts:

1) The Pearson Custom Library of American Literature, edited by Phillip J. Barrish

2) Kate Chopin, The Awakening, Dover Thrift Edition (other editions acceptable)

3) Course Packet (Barrish)

4) Note: Students who do not already own an I-Clicker will be required to purchase or rent one.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and brief, informal writing assignments in which you respond to what you have read; Participation and other in-class activities; One midterm and one final examination; Punctual attendance at all lectures and discussion sections.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34895-34940 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 1.402
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Instructor:  Barrish, P            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  34895-34940            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History --

This course surveys nearly four hundred years of American literature. We will concentrate on relating the diverse "voices" of American literature to one another and to the social and historical contexts appropriate to each, as well as on questions of literary form.

Texts: Course packet and selected novels. Students who do not already own clickers will be required to purchase them.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and brief, informal writing assignments in which you respond to what you have read; Participation and other in-class activities; One midterm and one final examination; Punctual attendance at all class meetings, including discussion sections.

E 370W • Amer Literary Masculinities

35435 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 204
(also listed as WGS 345 )
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Instructor:  Barrish, P            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35435            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will explore constructions of masculinity in American literature, taking a generally but not exclusively feminist perspective. Masculinity, as we will discover, has meant very different things at different times in US history, and has also varied in meaning and significance according to such broad categories of identity as social class, race, region, and queerness. Our primary focus will be on the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but we will also cover more recent materials.

Students should be prepared for a significant amount of reading, some of it challenging either in content or in level of difficulty.

Texts: Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of an American Slave, written by himself (1845); Owen Wister, The Virginian (1903); Ernest Hemingway, Assorted short stories; James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room; One (or two) feature-length films suggested by the class; Miscellaneous secondary sources (theoretical, historical, critical) which will be available in a course packet.

Requirements & Grading: An annotated bibliography on some tightly focused topic related to the theme of U.S. masculinities: 10%; Participation in a group presentation on some recent cultural phenomenon or text relevant to the course (e.g., the recent “It Gets Better” youtube project): 20%; 2-page, 3-page, and 8-page essays: 50%; Overall commitment to class (participation, attendance, etc.): 20%.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34735-34751 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WEL 3.502
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Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History --

This course surveys nearly four hundred years of North American literature. Among the many writers we will consider are Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Handsome Lake, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Harriet Jacobs, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Helen María Viramontes, and Li-Young Lee. We will concentrate on literary form, as well as on relating the diverse "voices" of American literature to one another and to the social and historical contexts appropriate to each. 

Texts: Paul Lauter, ed. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Concise Edition; Kate Chopin, The Awakening (Dover Thrift Edition).

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and brief, informal writing assignments in which you respond to what you have read; Two midterm examinations; One final examination; Punctual attendance at all class meetings, including discussion sections.

E 395M • Amer Literary Masculinities

35700 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.104
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Masculinities in U.S. Literature and Culture                  

This course will take as its focus diverse forms of “masculinity” as they have been constructed by U.S-American literary and cultural texts from roughly the end of the Civil War to the beginning of World War II, with some attention also paid to the rest of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. The course will in addition serve as an introduction to the burgeoning field of Masculinity Studies, where our emphasis will be on history, theory, and literary/cultural criticism. As we will discover, masculinity has meant different things at different times in US history, and has also varied in meaning and significance according to such broad categories of identity as race, class, national origin or citizenship status, and sexuality. And of course even synchronous texts within identity categories elaborate a range of different positions regarding standard constructions of masculinity and possible alternatives to or subversions of them.

Virtually any literary or cultural text in which gender plays a role (which essentially means any text ever written) conveys ideas about masculinity to its audience, whether explicitly or implicitly. In addition, the amount of available secondary material on masculinity is already quite large and is rapidly growing larger.  Our course will necessarily take the form of a selective (rather than comprehensive) survey, with all of the weaknesses and strengths that the survey format implies. I might add that although I am familiar with most of the literature we will be reading, masculinity studies is still a relatively new field for me: we will be learning and exploring together.

Here is a preliminary sampling of authors and texts I am so far considering, listed in a somewhat jumbled but not entirely meaningless order. Note that some of these works may not make it to the final syllabus and that other possibilities will almost certainly emerge.

Primary

Henry James, Daisy Miller (1878); Alfred Hitchcock, Vertigo (1958); Owen Wister, The Virginian (1903); Annie Proulx, “Brokeback Mountain” (1997); Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Ida B. Wells, Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases, and A Red Record (1892-94); Ernest Hemingway, In Our Time (1925) or The Sun Also Rises (1926); Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried (1990); Nella Larsen, Passing (1929); and James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room (1956).

Secondary

Michael Kimmel, Manhood in America: A Cultural History (1997); Gail Bederman, Manliness and Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917 (1996); Laura Mulvey, Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975); Kevin Gaines, Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture in the Twentieth Century (1997) and/or Clarence Lang,
Manliness and Its Discontents: The Black Middle Class and the Transformation of Masculinity, 1900-1930 (2005); Eve Sedgwick, Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (1985); Judith Butler, excerpts from Gender Trouble (1993) and Bodies That Matter (1990).

Requirements:

  • A three-page response paper
  • A class presentation on some cultural phenomenon or text relevant to the course, accompanied by an annotated bibliography.
  • A 10-12 page conference paper.

You will have the option of linking these three assignments.

E S370W • Lit/Film: Gend/Rlsm/Gothic-Eng

83825 • Summer 2011
Meets
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Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: Gender, genre, and the gothic in 19th-century British fiction--

Since the eighteenth century, the staples of the gothic genre have remained surprisingly consistent:

 

  • Gothic heroines who find themselves in jeopardy.
  • Gothic heroes haunted by murderous doubles.
  • Gothic villains associated with “deviant” sexualities.
  • Menacing mansions and secret rooms; murder and mayhem; pervading darkness (literal and figurative) and a great deal of dreadful weather.

 

Through the critical lens supplied by gender studies, this course will engage in a series of close textual analyses to illuminate how gothic elements—both narrative and aesthetic—serve to express, reinforce and/or subvert cultural ideas about femininity and masculinity in a selection of nineteenth-century British novels. We will also pay special attention to the intrusion of gothic elements into everyday life—this question will lead us to explore the intersection of literary gothic (usually considered a non-realist genre) with literary realism. Can gothic better express certain realities than realism can? In fact, can reality itself be gothic?

 

Texts: Primary texts so far include Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (written 1789; pub. 1818), which will lead us to visit the resort town of Bath; Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847), which (if all things go according to plan) will result in an overnight trip to the Yorkshire moors and the tiny, dark parsonage in which the Brontë sisters grew up; Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886); and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). Both of the latter texts will involve prowling around dark and scary corners of London, including the famous Victorian burial ground Highgate Cemetery.

 

Requirements & Grading: Grading will be based primarily on short writing assignments, a presentation, and overall engagement with the course (attendance, participation, etc.).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34990-35035 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WCH 1.120
show description

Description:

Literature in History--

This course surveys nearly four hundred years of North American literature.  Among the many writers we will consider are Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Handsome Lake, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Harriet Jacobs, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Helen María Viramontes, and Li-Young Lee.  We will concentrate on literary form, as well as on relating the diverse "voices" of American literature to one another and to the social and historical contexts appropriate to each.

Texts: Paul Lauter, ed. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Concise Edition, Kate Chopin, The Awakening (Dover Thrift Edition)

 Grading Policy: Quizzes and brief, informal writing assignments in which you respond to what you have read, Two midterm examinations, One final examination, Punctual attendance at all class meetings, including discussion sections.

Prerequisites:  Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

E 349S • James And Wharton

34675 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.128
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Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic: James and Wharton), 376L (James/Wharton: Novel of Manners), 379S (embedded topic: James and Wharton: American Novel of Manners).

Course Description: The novels of Henry James and Edith Wharton concentrate on life among the financially “comfortable” classes in late nineteenth and early twentieth century America. We will read as many works by these two authors as time allows. (The list below includes some of the texts that we may read, but I may also make some changes to it.) In exploring these works, we will discuss such issues the social construction of "whiteness" as a racial identity; the development of very fine gradations in social and cultural prestige; the significance of social climbing; and turn-of-the-century sex/gender crises involving masculinity and the New Woman. Students should realize that the novels of James, in particular, are long and written in a rather difficult (but stunning!) style. Be prepared for this if you enroll in the class.

Texts: Henry James: Daisy Miller, The Europeans, The Portrait of a Lady, Washington Square, The Turn of the Screw, What Maisie Knew, The Ambassadors; Edith Wharton: The House of Mirth, The Custom of the Country, The Age of Innocence, Summer, Collected Stories. We will view Martin Scorcese’s film version of The Age of Innocence and Jane Campion's film The Portrait of a Lady.

Grading: Students will write two short papers (2 and 4 pages, respectively) and one longer paper (8-10 pages). Everybody will also have to do one in-class presentation, and several informal one-page "response" papers. There will also be some in-class group work, including at least one-peer editing cycle (and possibly a group presentation). Finally, because it is important to class discussion that everybody keep up with the reading, I will give some "pop" quizzes on it. Strict attendance and punctuality will of course be required. Paper #1 (2 pages): 15%; Paper #2 (3 pages): 20%; Paper #3 (8-10 pages): 30%; Miscellaneous (response papers, group work, quizzes, overall engagement with course): 35%  [Note: the grading for this category will be clarified on the syllabus.]

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 338 • Amer Lit: From 1865 To Pres-W

34785 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 PAR 204
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American Literature 1865-Present
“Constructing and Deconstructing American Identities”

E338 / Unique 34785   Professor Phillip Barrish
Spring 2010   Office Hrs: M 1-3, W 1-2
 

 

(pbarrish@mail.utexas.edu)

Texts (in order we will be reading them)

  • Course packet available at:
  • Henry James, Daisy Miller (1878) [Recommended edition: Oxford World Classics]
  • Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins (1894) [Recommended edition: Norton Critical]
  • Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition (1901) [REQUIRED edition: BedfordCultural]
  • Wister, The Virginian [Recommended Edition: Signet Classics)
  • Ernest Hemingway, The Short Stories (1925-36) [Recommended edition: Scribner’s]
  • Nella Larsen, Passing (1929) [Recommend edition: Norton Critical]
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Love of the Last Tycoon (1941) [Recommended edition: Scribner’s]
  • Alfred Hitchcock (dir), Shadow of a Doubt (1943) (shown in class)
  • Sandra Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories (1991) [Recommended edition: Vintage]
  • Handouts, pdf files, etc. distributed throughout the term and/or available on our BlackBoard site (login at www.courses.utexas.edu).

Class Policies and Requirements, and Grading

This is an upper-division literature class with a substantial writing component. Hence, you should expect to do a lot of reading and writing. I hope that you (and I!) will find the class enjoyable, thought-provoking, and educational.

Please make sure to:

  • Complete every reading assignment before the class session during which it will be discussed. (I may “encourage” you to do this by giving unannounced reading quizzes.)
  • Have a copy of the relevant text on your desk when class begins every day.
  • Contribute to class discussion a minimum of two times per week (this is a guideline—I won’t be keeping strict track of it).
  • Contribute to the online discussion boards as per the syllabus.
  • Read your classmates’ contributions to the discussion boards.
  • _______ (to be filled in by class).

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 372M • American Realism-W

34985 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 900-1000 PAR 204
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AMERICAN LITERARY REALISM (1860-1905)

E372M   Unique #34985   Prof. Phillip Barrish (pbarrish@mail.utexas.edu)
Spring 2010   Office Hrs: M 1-3, W 1-2

Texts (in order we will be reading them)

  • Henry James, Washington Square (1880) [Recommended edition: Penguin Classics]
  • Stephen Crane, Maggie, a Girl of the Streets and Other New York Writings (1893)  [Recommended edition: Modern Library]
  • Kate Chopin, The Awakening (1899) [Recommended Edition: Penguin Classics]
  • Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins (1894) [Recommended edition: Norton Critical]
  • Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition (1901) [REQUIRED edition: Bedford Cultural Edition]
  • Theodore Dreiser, Sister Carrie (1901) [Recommended  Edition: Norton Critical]
  • Wister, The Virginian [Recommended Edition: Signet Classics)
  • Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth (1905) (Recommended Edition: Penguin Classics)
  • Course packet available at:
  • Handouts, pdf files, etc. distributed throughout the term and/or available on our BlackBoard site (login at www.courses.utexas.edu).

Class Policies, Requirements, and Grading

This is an upper-division literature class with a substantial writing component. Hence, you should expect to do a lot of reading and writing. I hope that you (and I!) will find the class enjoyable, thought-provoking, and educational in many ways. My most concrete pedagogical goal this term is to improve your skills at critical analysis, which will serve you well no matter what path you pursue in the future. For these good things to occur, we all have to take seriously our membership in the class’s intellectual community. Although I will do some lecturing (especially when we begin a new text), the preponderance of class time will be devoted to various forms of discussion. Discussion does not achieve its purpose unless everybody contributes—not necessarily during each and every class, but on a regular basis. In sum, you and I share the responsibility of investing enough of ourselves in the class to make it a success.

To that end, please make sure to:

  • Complete every reading assignment before the class session during which it will be discussed. (I may “encourage” you to do this by giving unannounced reading quizzes.)
  • Have a copy of the relevant text on your desk when class begins every day.
  • Contribute to the online discussion boards.
  • Read your classmates’ contributions to the discussion boards.
  • _______ (to be filled in by class).

Academic Honesty:

Any violation of academic honesty, including plagiarism, will result in a major grade reduction for the course and a report being made to Student Judiciary Services.  Plagiarism does not refer merely to copying language directly from an external source (book, article, website, unpublished essay written by somebody else, etc.) without acknowledgment, but also to ideas and insights found in the work of others. Even if you put somebody else’s idea or insight into your own words, you must acknowledge its source.  For further information on academic honesty and how to avoid violating it, please go to http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php.

Academic Accommodations:

Any student with a documented disability (physical or cognitive) who requires academic accommodations should be in touch with the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 (voice) or 471-4641 (TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Please do not hesitate to let me know of any accommodations you require: I will be happy to work with you.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

Publications

The Cambridge Introduction to American Literary Realism (Cambridge University Press, 2011).   

White Liberal Identity, Literary Pedagogy, and Classic American Realism (The Ohio State University Press, 2005).

American Literary Realism, Critical Theory, and Intellectual Prestige 1880-1995 (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

"The Sticky Web of Medical Professionalism: Health Care Reform and Robert Herrick’s The Web of Life, "American Literature (forthcoming).

"James, Realism, Naturalism," in David McWhirter, ed., Henry James in Context, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

"The Secret Joys of Antiracist Pedagogy: Huckleberry Finn in the Classroom," American Imago: Studies in Psychoanalysis and Culture 59:2 (Summer 2002): 117-40.

"Critical Presentism."  Romantic Circles Praxis Series. Special Issue on Romanticism and Contemporary Culture (February 2002, Online): http://www.rc.umd.edu/praxis/.

"The Awakening’s Signifying 'Mexicanist' Presence." Studies in American Fiction 28.1 (Spring 2000): 65-76.       

"The Remarrying Woman as Symptom: Exchange, Male Hysteria, and The Custom of the Country." American Literary Realism 27.2 (Winter 1995): 1-19.

 "'The Genuine Article': Ethnicity, Capital, and The Rise of David Levinsky." American Literary History 5.4 (Winter 1993): 643-62.  

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