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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

John P Rumrich

Professor Ph.D., 1981, University of Virginia

John P Rumrich

Contact

Biography

John Rumrich teaches the works of John Milton in their political and religious setting, seventeenth-century British poetry until the Restoration, and Shakespeare's plays as informed by their cultural and literary contexts. An NEH fellow (1990-91) and editor of Texas Studies in Literature and Language (1992-2007), he has been a visiting professor in China, France, Ireland, and South Africa.  Supported by grants from the Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services (2005-8), he led in the design of a book-based audiotext interface that has become a standard instructional resource. 

E 603A • Composition/Reading World Lit

34975 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 310
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Description:

Origin stories - We will begin with narratives from the Greco-Roman tradition translated by major early modern English poets and selections from Hebrew and Christian scripture.  As a way of defining and assessing the significance of genre in literary accounts of human life, we will also regularly read and discuss selected lyric poems written in English and attend carefully to the varieties of poetic form. 

Texts/Readings:

Homer, The Iliad (Pope's translation)

Vergil, The Aeneid (Dryden's Translation)

Ovid, Pharsalia (Marlowe's translation of Book 1)

Selections from Hebrew and Christian scriptures

Milton, Paradise Lost

Poems by various hands

Assignments:

A reading journal (two entries per week); four short essays (2-3 pages), two of them peer-edited; a final essay (5-7 pages); class presentations.

About the Professor:

John Rumrich regularly teaches Shakespeare's plays, the works of John Milton, and early modern British literary culture. An NEH fellow (1990-91) and editor of Texas Studies in Literature and Language (1992-2007), he was in 2014 named Honored Scholar by the Milton Society of America.  He has taught as a visiting professor in China, France, Ireland, New Zealand, and South Africa.  Supported by grants from the Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services (2005-8), he helped design a book-based audiotext interface that has become a standard instructional resource. 

E 363 • The Poetry Of Milton

35900 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 3.116
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Instructor:  Rumrich, J

Unique #:  35900

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Ethics and Leadership

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course begins with young man Milton on the brink of plunging into the religious controversies of the early 1640s, controversies that rapidly evolved into a tense political crisis followed by Civil War, Regicide, and the regime of Oliver Cromwell, for which Milton was chief spokesman. 

Milton’s neglect of poetry during the prime of his life to enter instead into the rough and tumble of religious and political controversies is the biographical instance of ethics and leadership initially addressed in this course.   During the late 1630s Milton’s sense of a divinely inspired poetic vocation came into conflict with his classically informed belief in a citizen’s ethical obligation to participate in public affairs.  The primary poetic text for this part of the course is Comus, supplemented by brief excerpts from Milton’s anti-clerical prose tracts.  The course then proceeds by setting Milton’s Restoration masterpieces (post-1660)—Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes—in the context of his Civil War and interregnum writings (1640-1660): on the origin and limits of executive power, on marriage as a societal institution subject to state regulation, and most fundamentally on the epistemological basis of individual autonomy and liberty in what Jefferson called “the pursuit of happiness.”  The very nature of the human subject was in contest during Milton’s era and the stakes of this contest appear strikingly in his most celebrated prose work, Areopagitica, which makes a comprehensive case against censorship and champions freedom of inquiry.

Assignments for the course include a series of student led presentations concerning Milton’s historical and poetic enactment of ethical crises in relation to leadership, both as an active instrument of power and as a passive sufferer.  Students will be asked to relate the particulars of Milton’s life and art to ongoing debates over the proper limits of governmental authority, the definition of marriage, freedom of information, and the correspondence of social policy to our understanding of human nature.

Texts: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (Random House, 2007).

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) Midterm and final examinations; unannounced quizzes; memorization assignment.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35820 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J

Unique #:  35820

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read eight plays and various sonnets, concentrating on themes established early in Shakespeare's career, when Elizabeth was on the throne. Aside from seeking insight into Shakespeare’s development as a playwright, we will focus on those moments in his plays that reflect on dramatic or theatrical fiction while nevertheless being a part of such a fiction. Discussions along this line will be pushed toward greater awareness of the historical conditions of Renaissance drama and particularly the conditions under which these plays were performed--during daylight, on a relatively unadorned, thrust stage, with a repertory company of limited size, composed entirely of males. Also of interest are the various dramatic models and idioms with which Shakespeare played, his choices of historical moments to represent on stage, and the pertinence of such play and such choices in the waning years of Elizabeth's reign and the early years of James’s.

Texts: To be announced.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes: There will be at least five or six unannounced quizzes on the reading. There are no makeups. This rule constitutes the de facto attendance policy.

Memorization:  Students will be asked to memorize and recite excerpts from works on the syllabus (as much as 80 lines total).

Midterm and Final: These exams will consist of memorization, formal analysis, identification questions, and short answer essays. The two exams will be the same format and length.

Journal: Make two good entries per week; each should take about 30 minutes to write. This is a pass-fail assignment.

Quizzes 20%; Memorization 20%; Midterm 30%; Final 30%.

E 363 • The Poetry Of Milton

36130 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 306
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J

Unique #:  36130

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read most of Milton's major poetry and selections from his prose. Approximately a third of the course will be devoted to Paradise Lost. The goal of the course is to inform students about John Milton in his historical circumstances, primarily through study of his poetry and certain of his prose works.

Milton believed that in order to write great poetry, the artist must live a "true poem." Taking Milton at his word, we will pay considerable attention to the extraordinary life and times of this obedient son, who was also a regicidal revolutionary, propagandist, divorcer, heretical theologian, historian, linguist, political philosopher, self-proclaimed prophet, and poet. Given the breadth and variety of Milton’s "true poem," it is a struggle to find coherence in either his life or work. Rather than force an agreement among the various versions of Milton proposed by modern scholarship, we will seek simply to ask key questions and recognize possible solutions.

One question we will certainly consider is what moved Milton to write an epic in defense of God's ways after he had suffered blindness, utter political defeat, imprisonment, a close brush with a grisly public execution, widespread ridicule, and domestic turmoil, not to mention the gout.

Texts: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (Random House, 2007).

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) Midterm and final examinations; unannounced quizzes; memorization assignment.

E 363 • The Poetry Of Milton

35905 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 0.128
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / E

Unique #:  35905            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read most of Milton's major poetry and selections from his prose. Approximately a third of the course will be devoted to Paradise Lost. The goal of the course is to inform students about John Milton in his historical circumstances, primarily through study of his poetry and certain of his prose works.

Milton believed that in order to write great poetry, the artist must live a "true poem." Taking Milton at his word, we will pay considerable attention to the extraordinary life and times of this obedient son, who was also a regicidal revolutionary, propagandist, divorcer, heretical theologian, historian, linguist, political philosopher, self-proclaimed prophet, and poet. Given the breadth and variety of Milton’s "true poem," it is a struggle to find coherence in either his life or work. Rather than force an agreement among the various Miltons proposed by modern scholarship, we will seek simply to ask key questions and recognize possible solutions.

One question we will certainly consider is what moved Milton to write an epic in defense of God's ways after he had suffered blindness, utter political defeat, imprisonment, a close brush with a grisly public execution, widespread ridicule, and domestic turmoil, not to mention the gout.

Texts: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (Random House, 2007).

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) Midterm and final examinations; unannounced quizzes; memorization assignment.

E 366K • Shakespeare: Select Tragedies

35920 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / D

Unique #:  35920            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The goal of the course is to inform students regarding Shakespearean tragic drama in its historical circumstances and to introduce the performance and critical history of the scheduled plays.

Texts: Spanish Tragedy [by Thomas Kyd], New Mermaid paperback; Henry VIII, Pelican paperback; Hamlet, Pelican paperback; King Lear, Pelican paperback; Macbeth, Pelican paperback; Coriolanus, Pelican paperback; Tempest, Pelican paperback.Texts will be available at the Co-op.

Grading & Requirements: Midterm (25%); Final (30%). Exams will test students’ ability to analyze verse and their familiarity with course readings and lectures.

(25%) Five or six unannounced quizzes on the reading will be given. Students are expected to have read the assignments attentively. NO MAKEUPS: This rule is in effect the attendance policy. As a concession to unforeseeable circumstances, the lowest quiz score will be dropped. That is the only concession.

(20%) Students will memorize 80 lines of verse (NOT prose) from the plays on the schedule: 40 by midterm; another 40 before the end of classes.

Journals: Two entries per week. Each should take 30 minutes to write and consist of a blend of summary and commentary. The crucial requirement is to write, continuously if possible, for thirty minutes. Performance as a journal writer cannot hurt a student’s course grade unless the student skimps on entries. The point of the assignment is to practice writing and is about day-to-day discipline rather than inspiration.

E F321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

83520 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm SAC 5.102
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  D

Unique #:  83520            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read seven plays composed in the early 1590s as well as Shakespeare’s sonnets in an attempt to identify themes established early in Shakespeare's career, when Elizabeth was entering her final decade on the throne and the triumph over the Spanish Armada was a recent memory. Aside from seeking insight into Shakespeare’s development as a playwright, we will focus on those moments in his plays that reflect on dramatic or theatrical fiction while nevertheless being part of such a fiction. Discussions along this line will be pushed toward greater awareness of the historical conditions of Renaissance drama and particularly the conditions under which these plays were performed--during daylight, on a relatively unadorned, thrust stage, with a repertory company of limited size, composed entirely of males. We will identify the various dramatic models and idioms with which Shakespeare played, his choices of historical moments to represent on stage, and the pertinence of such play and such choices in the waning years of Elizabeth's reign.

Texts: (tentative) Spanish Tragedy [by Thomas Kyd], New Mermaid paperback; Hamlet, Pelican paperback; King Lear, Pelican paperback; Macbeth, Pelican paperback; Coriolanus, Pelican paperback; Tempest, Pelican paperback.  Texts will be available at the Co-op.  We will also be studying Shakespeare’s sonnets.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes: There will be at least five unannounced quizzes on the reading. There are no makeups. This rule constitutes the de facto attendance policy. If a student misses class on the day of a quiz, the student receives a zero for that quiz. The margin for error is small; I will drop only the lowest grade.

Exams: Our two exams will consist of memorization (80 lines total; 40 for each exam), formal analysis, identification questions, and short answer essays. The two exams will be the same format and length.

Journal: One entry per week reviewing performances of plays on the syllabus; each entry should take about an hour to write. The performances you review can be live or videotaped (there are many such available on-line or in the collection held in the Undergraduate Library.

Quizzes 25%; Exams 50%; Journal 25%.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35295 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 303
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / D

Unique #:  35295            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read eight plays and various sonnets, concentrating on themes established early in Shakespeare's career, when Elizabeth was on the throne. Aside from seeking insight into Shakespeare’s development as a playwright, we will focus on those moments in his plays that reflect on dramatic or theatrical fiction while nevertheless being a part of such a fiction. Discussions along this line will be pushed toward greater awareness of the historical conditions of Renaissance drama and particularly the conditions under which these plays were performed--during daylight, on a relatively unadorned, thrust stage, with a repertory company of limited size, composed entirely of males. Also of interest are the various dramatic models and idioms with which Shakespeare played, his choices of historical moments to represent on stage, and the pertinence of such play and such choices in the waning years of Elizabeth's reign and the early years of James’s.

Texts: To be announced.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes: There will be at least five or six unannounced quizzes on the reading. There are no makeups. This rule constitutes the de facto attendance policy. If a student misses class on the day of a quiz, the student receives a zero for that quiz. The margin for error is small; I will drop only the lowest grade.

Midterm and Final: These exams will consist of memorization, formal analysis, identification questions, and short answer essays. The two exams will be the same format and length. The final will not be cumulative with regard to the reading.

Journal: Make two good entries per week; each should take about 30 minutes to write. This is a pass-fail assignment.

Quizzes 20%; Midterm 40%; Final 40%.

E 363 • The Poetry Of Milton

35595 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 306
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / E

Unique #:  35595            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read most of Milton's major poetry and selections from his prose. Approximately a third of the course will be devoted to Paradise Lost. The goal of the course is to inform students about John Milton in his historical circumstances, primarily through study of his poetry and certain of his prose works.

Milton believed that in order to write great poetry, the artist must live a "true poem." Taking Milton at his word, we will pay considerable attention to the extraordinary life and times of this obedient son, who was also a regicidal revolutionary, propagandist, divorcer, heretical theologian, historian, linguist, political philosopher, self-proclaimed prophet, and poet. Given the breadth and variety of Milton’s "true poem," it is a struggle to find coherence in either his life or work. Rather than force an agreement among the various Miltons proposed by modern scholarship, we will seek simply to ask key questions and recognize possible solutions.

One question we will certainly consider is what moved Milton to write an epic in defense of God's ways after he had suffered blindness, utter political defeat, imprisonment, a close brush with a grisly public execution, widespread ridicule, and domestic turmoil, not to mention the gout.

Texts: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (Random House, 2007).

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) Midterm and final examinations; unannounced quizzes; memorization assignment.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35310 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / D

Unique #:  35310            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read eight plays and various sonnets, concentrating on themes established early in Shakespeare's career, when Elizabeth was on the throne. Aside from seeking insight into Shakespeare’s development as a playwright, we will focus on those moments in his plays that reflect on dramatic or theatrical fiction while nevertheless being a part of such a fiction. Discussions along this line will be pushed toward greater awareness of the historical conditions of Renaissance drama and particularly the conditions under which these plays were performed--during daylight, on a relatively unadorned, thrust stage, with a repertory company of limited size, composed entirely of males. Also of interest are the various dramatic models and idioms with which Shakespeare played, his choices of historical moments to represent on stage, and the pertinence of such play and such choices in the waning years of Elizabeth's reign and the early years of James’s.

Texts: To be announced.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes: There will be at least five or six unannounced quizzes on the reading. There are no makeups. This rule constitutes the de facto attendance policy. If a student misses class on the day of a quiz, the student receives a zero for that quiz. The margin for error is small; I will drop only the lowest grade.

Midterm and Final: These exams will consist of memorization, formal analysis, identification questions, and short answer essays. The two exams will be the same format and length. The final will not be cumulative with regard to the reading.

Journal: Make two good entries per week; each should take about 30 minutes to write. This is a pass-fail assignment.

Quizzes 20%; Midterm 40%; Final 40%.

E 363 • The Poetry Of Milton

35565 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / E

Unique #:  35565            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read most of Milton's major poetry and selections from his prose. Approximately a third of the course will be devoted to Paradise Lost. The goal of the course is to inform students about John Milton in his historical circumstances, primarily through study of his poetry and certain of his prose works.

Milton believed that in order to write great poetry, the artist must live a "true poem." Taking Milton at his word, we will pay considerable attention to the extraordinary life and times of this obedient son, who was also a regicidal revolutionary, propagandist, divorcer, heretical theologian, historian, linguist, political philosopher, self-proclaimed prophet, and poet. Given the breadth and variety of Milton’s "true poem," it is a struggle to find coherence in either his life or work. Rather than force an agreement among the various Miltons proposed by modern scholarship, we will seek simply to ask key questions and recognize possible solutions.

One question we will certainly consider is what moved Milton to write an epic in defense of God's ways after he had suffered blindness, utter political defeat, imprisonment, a close brush with a grisly public execution, widespread ridicule, and domestic turmoil, not to mention the gout.

Texts: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (Random House, 2007).

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) Midterm and final examinations; unannounced quizzes; memorization assignment.

E S321 • Shakespeare: Sel Plays-Eng

83840 • Summer 2012
Meets
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Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / D

Unique #:  83840            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions: Oxford Summer Program participants

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

 

E 379M (Topic 3: Shakespeare in Performance) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Shakespeare offers perhaps the most direct and entertaining route to the heart of English culture. This course will afford students a rare opportunity not only to read Shakespeare's works but also to watch them performed on stage by fine professional actors. Our syllabus will correspond to the scheduled performances of Shakespeare's plays in Stratford and London. Discussion and lecture will reflect on these present-day renditions of Shakespeare's plays by detailing the conditions under which renaissance drama was originally presented--during daylight, on a relatively unadorned, thrust stage, by a repertory company of limited size, composed entirely of males. Especially during our visits to the Globe we will attempt to recognize how Shakespeare and his company might turn these apparent liabilities to their advantage. The classic example is Shakespeare's fondness for disguise plots in which young women dress up as young men, encouraging questions about sex roles and the constitution of gender. Every chance to understand the specific conditions of present-day performance such as those at Stratford upon Avon will also be taken.

Texts:  Richard III, Henry V, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, AYLI or Hamlet (to be determined). We will be using the Pelican Shakespeare series of paperback editions.

Requirements & Grading: Students will be asked to keep a reading and performance journal and to review two of the performances in 3-4 page essays (750-1000 words) (40%). There will also be quizzes on the reading (25%) and a memorization assignment, including formal analysis of the verses memorized (35%).

E 363 • The Poetry Of Milton

35395 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 304
show description

Instructor:  Rumrich, J            Areas:  I / E

Unique #:  35395            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read most of Milton's major poetry and selections from his prose. Approximately a third of the course will be devoted to Paradise Lost. The goal of the course is to inform students about John Milton in his historical circumstances, primarily through study of his poetry and certain of his prose works.

Milton believed that in order to write great poetry, the artist must live a "true poem." Taking Milton at his word, we will pay considerable attention to the extraordinary life and times of this obedient son, who was also a regicidal revolutionary, propagandist, divorcer, heretical theologian, historian, linguist, political philosopher, self-proclaimed prophet, and poet. Given the breadth and variety of Milton’s "true poem," it is a struggle to find coherence in either his life or work. Rather than force an agreement among the various Miltons proposed by modern scholarship, we will seek simply to ask key questions and recognize possible solutions.

One question we will certainly consider is what moved Milton to write an epic in defense of God's ways after he had suffered blindness, utter political defeat, imprisonment, a close brush with a grisly public execution, widespread ridicule, and domestic turmoil, not to mention the gout.

Texts: The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (Random House, 2007).

Requirements & Grading: (tentative) Midterm and final examinations; unannounced quizzes; memorization assignment.

E 392M • Milton In Restoratn/18th-Cen

35680 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.104
show description

John Milton in the Restoration and Eighteenth Century

This course will examine Milton’s Restoration writings, primarily his late masterpieces, and certain episodes of his early reception history that bear on his conception and expectation of literary immortality as a psychological incarnation within readers or an invasion of their imaginations:  Bentley’s notorious edition of Paradise Lost, for example; Lauder’s fraudulent accusations of Milton’s plagiarism; the novel approach to Milton taken by Mary Shelley in Frankenstein.

The course tracks my own research currently underway and will be exploratory and wide ranging.  Students will be expected to lead discussion on a given topic at least once during the semester and to submit a seminar paper (15-20 pages in length) composed as if it were the draft of a scholarly article.

E F321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

83555 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 204
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: We will read seven plays composed in the early 1590s as well as Shakespeare’s sonnets in an attempt to identify themes established early in Shakespeare's career, when Elizabeth was entering her final decade on the throne and the triumph over the Spanish Armada was a recent memory. Aside from seeking insight into Shakespeare’s development as a playwright, we will focus on those moments in his plays that reflect on dramatic or theatrical fiction while nevertheless being part of such a fiction. Discussions along this line will be pushed toward greater awareness of the historical conditions of Renaissance drama and particularly the conditions under which these plays were performed--during daylight, on a relatively unadorned, thrust stage, with a repertory company of limited size, composed entirely of males. We will identify the various dramatic models and idioms with which Shakespeare played, his choices of historical moments to represent on stage, and the pertinence of such play and such choices in the waning years of Elizabeth's reign. 

 

Texts: (tentative) 3Henry 6, Richard 3, Comedy of Errors, Taming of the Shrew, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Romeo and Juliet, Richard 2, Shakespeare’s Sonnets.  We will be using the Pelican Shakespeare series of paperback editions.

 

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes: There will be at least five unannounced quizzes on the reading. There are no makeups. This rule constitutes the de facto attendance policy. If a student misses class on the day of a quiz, the student receives a zero for that quiz. The margin for error is small; I will drop only the lowest grade.

 

Exams: Our two exams will consist of memorization (80 lines total; 40 for each exam), formal analysis, identification questions, and short answer essays. The two exams will be the same format and length.

 

Performance Journal: One entry per week reviewing performances of the plays we are studying; each entry should take about an hour to write. The performances you review can be live or videotaped (there are many such available on-line or in the collection held in the Undergraduate Library.

 

Quizzes 25%; Exams 50%; Journal 25%.

E 363 • The Poetry Of Milton

34920 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 201
show description

E363, The Poetry of Milton, Spring 2010

Prof. Rumrich, Par 108.  Office Hours: Available upon Request.

¤ Course Objectives:

The goal of the course is to inform students about the poetry of John Milton in its historical circumstances and to consider the poet’s lasting pertinence.  To this end we will also read certain of his prose works and assess their historical significance.

¤ Texts:

The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (Modern Library, 2007) [hereafter, MLM], available at the Co-op.

¤ Exams: 

Midterm (25%); Final (35%).  Exams will test students’ ability to analyze verse and their familiarity with course readings and lectures. Scheduling of the final exam is done by the University approximately four weeks before the semester ends; please consult the Registrar’s page for details: http://registrar.utexas.edu/students/exams/index.html 

¤ Memorization:

 (20%) Students will memorize 80 lines of verse:  40 by midterm; another 40 before the end of classes.  At least half of the lines must come from Paradise Lost

¤ Quizzes:

(20%) Five or six unannounced quizzes on the reading will be given.  Students are expected to have read the assignments attentively. 

¤ NO MAKEUPS: 

This rule is in effect the attendance policy.  If you miss classes, your quiz average will likely suffer. This consequence is intended.  As a concession to unforeseeable circumstances, your lowest quiz score will be dropped.  That is the only concession.

¤ Journals:

Make two entries per week.  Each should take 30 minutes to write and consist of a blend of summary and commentary, though some meandering is expected.  The crucial requirement is that you write, continuously if possible, for thirty minutes.  When you are stuck, one thing you might do is look up any words, names, places in the reading that you don’t recognize and write out the definitions or explanations in your journal.  You should consult the OED and the classical dictionaries on the library’s electronic reference site.  For instructional purposes, I may refer to specific journal entries in class, but the identities of those responsible for particular comments will be shielded.  Performance as a journal writer cannot hurt your course grade unless you skimp on entries. The point of the assignment is to practice writing and is more about day-to-day discipline than inspiration.

¤ Scholastic Dishonesty:

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty may incur disciplinary penalties including failure of the course and dismissal from the university.

Students with disabilities may seek appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 366K • Shakespeare: Select Tragedies

34935 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm PAR 306
show description

 

E366K, Shakespeare: Select Tragedies

  Prof. Rumrich, Par 108. 
Spring, 2010   Office Hours: Available on request.

¤ Course Objectives:

The goal of the course is to inform students regarding Shakespearean tragic drama in its historical circumstances and to introduce the performance and critical history of the scheduled plays.

¤ Texts:

Revels Student Edition of Tamburlaine the Great, Parts 1 and 2; Norton Critical Editions of Richard III, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, Othello, Lear, and Macbeth.  Texts are on order at the Co-op.

¤ Exams: 

Midterm (20%); Final (30%).  Exams will test students’ ability to analyze verse and their familiarity with course readings and lectures. Scheduling of the final exam is done by the University approximately four weeks before the semester ends; please consult the Registrar’s page for details: http://registrar.utexas.edu/students/exams/index.html 

¤ Quizzes:

(20%) Five or six unannounced quizzes on the reading will be given.  Students are expected to have read the assignments attentively.  NO MAKEUPSThis rule is in effect the attendance policy.  If you miss classes, your quiz average will likely suffer. This consequence is intended.  As a concession to unforeseeable circumstances, your lowest quiz score will be dropped.  That is the only concession.

¤ Memorization:

(15%) Students will memorize 80 lines of verse (NOT prose) from the plays on the schedule:  40 by midterm; another 40 before the end of classes.  

¤ Presentation:

(15%) Students in teams of two will offer short (10-15 minute) class presentations based on the history and criticism included in the Norton Critical Editions.

¤ Journals:

Make two entries per week.  Each should take 30 minutes to write and consist of a blend of summary and commentary, though some meandering is expected.  The crucial requirement is that you write, continuously if possible, for thirty minutes.  When you are stuck, one thing you might do is look up any words, names, places in the reading that you don’t recognize and write out the definitions or explanations in your journal.  You should consult the OED and the classical dictionaries on the library’s electronic reference site.  For instructional purposes, I may refer to specific journal entries in class, but the identities of those responsible for particular comments will be shielded.  Performance as a journal writer cannot hurt your course grade unless you skimp on entries. The point of the assignment is to practice writing and is more about day-to-day discipline than inspiration.

¤ Scholastic Dishonesty:

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty may incur disciplinary penalties including failure of the course and dismissal from the university.

Students with disabilities may seek appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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