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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Helena Woodard

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1991, English, University of North Carolina

Contact

Biography

Associate Professor Helena Woodard received her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina in 1991.  Her recent publications include: "African-British Writers: Champions of Freedom," Equiano: Enslavement, Resistance and Abolition.  Eds. Arthur Torrington et al.  London: The Equiano society and Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery (2007).  "Troubling the Archives: Reconstituting the Slave Subject," Revisiting Slave Narratives / Les avatars contemporains des recits d'esclaves.  Ed. Judith Misrahi-Barak. 'Les carnets du Cerpac', Services des Publications.  Montpellier III, France (2005).  ''Reading The two Marys (Prince and Shelley) on the Textual Meeting Ground of Race, Gender, and Genre,'' Tennessee Studies in Literature (1994).

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Identity, slaveryRace and ethnicity

 

Interests

18th century British literature; ethnic and Third World literature; american literature, critical race theory; women, gender, and literature

E 376M • Writing Slavery

34935 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 310
(also listed as AFR 374F, WGS 340 )
show description

E 376M  l  3-Writing Slavery

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  34935

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F; WGS 340

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discourse. The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals. Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy.

Required Readings (subject to change): Elizabeth Alexander, The Venus Hottentot: Poems; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Classic Slave Narratives; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works; Marlene Nourbise Philip, Zong!; Fred D’Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts; Edward P. Jones, The Known World; Course Pak (Speedway on Dobie).

Requirements & Grading: .75: Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced) and one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer evaluation; see revision instruction handout); .15: Response papers based on course reading (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10: Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 376S • Afr Am Lit Snc Harlm Renais

34950 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm PAR 310
(also listed as AFR 372E )
show description

E 376S  l  African American Literature Since the Harlem Renaissance

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  34950

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Cultural Diversity, Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago? Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others? How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? For example, writers like the late Claudia Tate argue that because of the continuation of racial oppression and “the demand for black literature to identify and militate against it, black literature evolves so as to prove that racism exists in the real world and is not a figment of the black imagination.” Such a view resists psychoanalytical readings that center the individual’s primary nurturing environment, rather than the external circumstances that precondition that environment. Conversely, psychoanalysis readings of racism risk designating race as pathology. Enter Epifano San Juan, who observes that race is “an unstable and decentered complex of social meanings constantly being transformed by political struggle…. It is a framework for articulating identity and difference, a process that governs the political and ideological constitution of subjects/agents in history.” This course engages the eclectic quality of African-American literature since the Harlem Renaissance.

Texts: Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ann Petry, The Street; Toni Morrison, Beloved; August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Harryette Mullen, Sleeping with the Dictionary; John Edgar Wideman, Cattle Killing; Van Jordan, Macnolia: Poems.

Requirements & Grading: .75, Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed; ds)--one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer reading; see revision handout); .15, Response papers (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10, Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA (Modern Language Association Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Grading Scale: A (94-95; A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 314V • African American Lit And Cul

35120 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 304
(also listed as AFR 317F )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  35120

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F

Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is an introduction to selected African-American literature—slave narratives, novels, poetry, and plays—from slavery to the present. The course historicizes issues pertinent to the African-American literary tradition, such as slavery, double consciousness or the struggle for self-identity, as well as class, racism, and sexism. It thematizes these issues through stylistic forms, including the oral vernacular tradition, folk culture, double discourse, and chiasmus.

Primary Texts: Henry Louis Gates, Jr., ed. Classic Slave Narratives (Signet Classics); Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 1974); Gwendolyn Brooks, Maud Martha (New York: Harper, 1953); August Wilson, The Piano Lesson (New York: Penguin, 1990); Harryette Mullen, Sleeping With the Dictionary (Berkeley: U of California Press, 2002); Jesymn Ward, Salvage the Bones (New York: Bloomsbury, 2011).

Requirements & Grading: Three critical essays (six typed pages each, double-spaced) - 70%; Reading quizzes / Class participation / Oral and written (group) presentations, TBA - 30%.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. Upon your fifth absence, you will be notified of your failure of the course, and you need not return to class. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Policies: Absolutely no make-ups for quizzes; however, your lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Please read the entire assignment by the first day of class discussion for that work.

Grading Scale: A (94-95); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 349S • Toni Morrison

35815 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 500pm-630pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 372E, WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  35815

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 345

Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison. The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries. Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises: infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc. Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

Required Reading: The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; Home.

Audio-Visual Aids: Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

Requirements & Grading: .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

ATTENDANCE: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself. I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minues late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence. Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book. No makeup for quizzes is permitted. Course pack articles are required reading.

GRADING SCALE: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 349S • Toni Morrison

36040 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 372E, WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  36040

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 345

Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic 5), 376M (Topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison), 379S (embedded topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison).

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison. The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries. Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises: infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc. Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

Required Reading: The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; Home; COURSE PACK (purchase at Speedway; Dobie).

Audio-Visual Aids: Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

Requirements & Grading: .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

ATTENDANCE: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself. I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minues late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence. Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book. No makeup for quizzes is permitted. Course pack articles are required reading.

GRADING SCALE: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 376M • Writing Slavery

36185 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 500pm-630pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  36185

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F; WGS 340

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discourse. The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals. Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy.

Required Readings (subject to change): Elizabeth Alexander, The Venus Hottentot: Poems; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Classic Slave Narratives; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works; Marlene Nourbise Philip, Zong!; Fred D’Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts; Edward P. Jones, The Known World; Course Pak (Speedway on Dobie).

Requirements & Grading: .75: Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced) and one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer evaluation; see revision instruction handout); .15: Response papers based on course reading (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10: Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 314V • African American Lit And Cul

35045 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.212
(also listed as AFR 317F )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  35045            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is an introduction to selected African-American literature—slave narratives, novels, poetry, and plays—from slavery to the present. The course historicizes issues pertinent to the African-American literary tradition, such as slavery, double consciousness or the struggle for self-identity, as well as class, racism, and sexism. It thematizes these issues through stylistic forms, including the oral vernacular tradition, folk culture, double discourse, and chiasmus.

Primary Texts: Henry Louis Gates, Jr., ed. Classic Slave Narratives (Signet Classics); Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 1974); Gwendolyn Brooks, Maud Martha (New York: Harper, 1953); August Wilson, The Piano Lesson (New York: Penguin, 1990); Harryette Mullen, Sleeping With the Dictionary (Berkeley: U of California Press, 2002); Jesymn Ward, Salvage the Bones (New York: Bloomsbury, 2011).

Requirements & Grading: Three critical essays (six typed pages each, double-spaced) - 70%; Reading quizzes / Class participation / Oral and written (group) presentations, TBA - 30%.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. Upon your fifth absence, you will be notified of your failure of the course, and you need not return to class. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Policies: Absolutely no make-ups for quizzes; however, your lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Please read the entire assignment by the first day of class discussion for that work.

Grading Scale: A (94-95); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 376R • Afr Am Lit Thru Harl Renais

35975 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 372E )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  II / G

Unique #:  35975            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course is an introduction to select African-American literature--slave narratives, poetry, novels, essays—in a tripartite format that extends from slavery to Reconstruction through the Harlem Renaissance. The course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discouse. The course historicizes issues pertinent to the development of an African-American literary tradition, such as critical race theory, double consciousness or the struggle for self-identity, as complicated by issues pertaining to class, race, and gender. These issues are thematized through stylistic forms that include the oral vernacular tradition, blues ideology, and folk culture. In the third and final unit, the course examines an unprecedented flourishing of seminal literature, art, music, and culture produced throughout the Harlem Renaissance.

Required Readings: Classic Slave Narratives, Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; The Poems of Phillis Wheatley, Phillis Wheatley; The Marrow of Tradition, Charles Chesnutt; Passing, Nella Larsen; The New Negro: Voices of the Harlem Renaissance, Alain Locke, ed.; Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, Houston Baker; Course pack, Speedway on Dobie.

 

*Requirements & Grading:

.75   Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced)

         One major critical essay revision; see separate handout.

.15   Response papers, (in-class and out-of-class, based on course readings, 1-2 pages); reading quizzes; class participation

.10   Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report

*The course contains select readings from African American literature from slavery through the Harlem Renaissance. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. The subject of each class meeting may be determined from the assigned reading for the day (see course schedule). The instructor retains the right to vary this syllabus.

ATTENDANCE: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

CLASS POLICIES: Absolutely no make-up for reading quizzes. In exchange, the lowest quize grade will be dropped. Except under extreme emergencies, and then only with the permission of the professor, late assignments will not be accepted. I reserve the right to make these decisions on a case by case basis. You must bring your books to class and complete all reading assignments by the first day of class discussion for that text. Students are expected to turn in all required assignments on the agreed upon due date at the beginning of class. Papers turned in during or after class on the due day will be considered late. Use the MLA (Modern Language Association) Handout for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Special Accommodations for Students with a Disability: Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. Please notify the professor of nyi special accommodations sthat you may need prior to the end of the second week of class.

Policy on Religious Observance: A student who is absent from a class or examinaation due to the observance of a religious holy day may complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence if proper notice has been given. Notice must be given at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dafes the student will be absent. For religious holy days that fall within the first two weeks of the semeser, notice should be given on the first day of the semester.

GRADING SCALE: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E F376S • Afr Am Lit Snc Harlem Renais

83590 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm BEN 1.122
(also listed as AFR F372E )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  II / G

Unique #:  83590            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E            Computer Instruction:  n/a

E 376M (Topic 2: African American Literature, 1940 to Present) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago? Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others? How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? For example, writers like the late Claudia Tate argue that because of the continuation of racial oppression and “the demand for black literature to identify and militate against it, black literature evolves so as to prove that racism exists in the real world and is not a figment of the black imagination.” Such a view resists psychoanalytical readings that center the individual’s primary nurturing environment, rather than the external circumstances that precondition that environment. Conversely, psychoanalysis readings of racism risk designating race as pathology. Enter Epifano San Juan, who observes that race is “an unstable and decentered complex of social meanings constantly being transformed by political struggle…. It is a framework for articulating identity and difference, a process that governs the political and ideological constitution of subjects/agents in history.” This course engages the eclectic quality of African-American literature since the Harlem Renaissance in the context of modernist to postmodernist debate.

Texts: Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ann Petry, The Street; August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Gwendolyn Brooks, Maud Martha; Toni Morrison, Home; Harryette Mullen, Sleeping With the Dictionary: (Poems).

Requirements & Grading: .25 Midterm exam; .25 One critical paper (three to four pages; typed; double-spaced); .25 Reading quizzes; class participation; .25 Final exam.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA (Modern Language Association Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Grading Scale: A (94-95; A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 314V • African American Lit And Cul

34755 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 317F )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34755            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is an introduction to selected African-American literature—slave narratives, novels, poetry, and plays—from slavery to the present. The course historicizes issues pertinent to the African-American literary tradition, such as slavery, double consciousness or the struggle for self-identity, as well as class, racism, and sexism. It thematizes these issues through stylistic forms, including the oral vernacular tradition, folk culture, double discourse, and chiasmus.

Primary Texts: Henry Louis Gates, Jr., ed. Classic Slave Narratives (Signet Classics); Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 1974); Gwendolyn Brooks, Maud Martha (New York: Harper, 1953); August Wilson, The Piano Lesson (New York: Penguin, 1990); Harryette Mullen, Sleeping With the Dictionary (Berkeley: U of California Press, 2002); Jesymn Ward, Salvage the Bones (New York: Bloomsbury, 2011).

Requirements & Grading: Three critical essays (six typed pages each, double-spaced) - 70%; Reading quizzes / Class participation / Oral and written (group) presentations, TBA - 30%.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. Upon your fifth absence, you will be notified of your failure of the course, and you need not return to class. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Policies: Absolutely no make-ups for quizzes; however, your lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Please read the entire assignment by the first day of class discussion for that work.

Grading Scale: A (94-95); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 349S • Toni Morrison

35510 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 500pm-630pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 372E, WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35510            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic 5), 376M (Topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison), 379S (embedded topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison).

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison. The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries. Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises: infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc. Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

Required Reading: The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; Home; COURSE PACK (purchase at Speedway; Dobie).

Audio-Visual Aids: Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

Requirements & Grading: .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

ATTENDANCE: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself. I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minues late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence. Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book. No makeup for quizzes is permitted. Course pack articles are required reading.

GRADING SCALE: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 376M • Writing Slavery

35665 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  35665            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F; WGS 340            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discourse. The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals. Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy.

Required Readings: Elizabeth Alexander, The Venus Hottentot: Poems; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Classic Slave Narratives; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works; Marlene Nourbise Philip, Zong!; Fred D’Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts; Edward P. Jones, The Known World; Course Pak (Speedway on Dobie).

Requirements & Grading: .75: Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced) and one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer evaluation; see revision instruction handout); .15: Response papers based on course reading (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10: Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 376S • Afr Am Lit Since Harlem Renais

35675 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 105
(also listed as AFR 372E )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  II / G

Unique #:  35675            Flags:  Cultural Diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago? Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others? How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? For example, writers like the late Claudia Tate argue that because of the continuation of racial oppression and “the demand for black literature to identify and militate against it, black literature evolves so as to prove that racism exists in the real world and is not a figment of the black imagination.” Such a view resists psychoanalytical readings that center the individual’s primary nurturing environment, rather than the external circumstances that precondition that environment. Conversely, psychoanalysis readings of racism risk designating race as pathology. Enter Epifano San Juan, who observes that race is “an unstable and decentered complex of social meanings constantly being transformed by political struggle…. It is a framework for articulating identity and difference, a process that governs the political and ideological constitution of subjects/agents in history.” This course engages the eclectic quality of African-American literature since the Harlem Renaissance.

Texts: Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ann Petry, The Street; Toni Morrison, Beloved; August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Harryette Mullen, Sleeping with the Dictionary; John Edgar Wideman, Cattle Killing; Van Jordan, Macnolia: Poems.

Requirements & Grading: .75, Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed; ds)--one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer reading; see revision handout); .15, Response papers (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10, Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA (Modern Language Association Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Grading Scale: A (94-95; A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E F349S • Toni Morrison

83665 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm PAR 105
(also listed as AFR F374F, WGS F340 )
show description

This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison. The novels thematize womanism as theory in experiences uniquely shared by women across ethnic, class, and regional boundaries. Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises: infanticide, familial relationships and conflict, cultural survival, etc. Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition. 

Texts: Required Reading

The Bluest Eye, 1970.

Sula, 1973.

Song of Solomon, 1977.

Tar Baby, 1981.

Beloved, 1987.

Jazz, 1992.

A Mercy, 2008. 

E 349S • Toni Morrison

35345 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35345            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F; WGS 340            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic 5), 376M (Topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison), 379S (embedded topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison. The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries. Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises: infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc. Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

Required Reading: The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination; COURSE PACK (purchase at Speedway; Dobie).

Audio-Visual Aids: Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

Requirements & Grading: .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations(TBA)/quizzes/class participation. 

ATTENDANCE: Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself. I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minues late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence. Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book.  No makeup for quizzes is permitted. Course pack articles are required reading.

GRADING SCALE: Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.   This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.

E 376M • Writing Slavery

35480 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Woodard, H            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  35480            Flags:  Writing, Cultural diversity

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F; WGS 340            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discourse. The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals. Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy.

Texts: REQUIRED READINGS: Elizabeth Alexander, The Venus Hottentot: Poems; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Classic Slave Narratives; Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Fred D’Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts; Edward P. Jones, The Known World; Course Pak (Speedway on Dobie).

Requirements & Grading: .75: Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced) and one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer evaluation; see revision instruction handout); .15: Response papers based on course reading (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10: Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59). Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 376M • Writing Slavery

35485 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discouse. The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals. Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy. 

Texts: REQUIRED READINGS: Elizabeth Alexander, The Venus Hottentot: Poems; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Classic Slave Narratives; Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Fred D’Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts; Edward P. Jones, The Known World; Course Pak (Speedway on Dobie).

Requirements & Grading: .75: Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced) and one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer evaluation; see revision instruction handout); .15: Response papers based on course reading (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10: Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59). Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

E 376S • Afr Am Lit Since Harlem Renais

35490 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago? Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others? How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? For example, writers like the late Claudia Tate argue that because of the continuation of racial oppression and “the demand for black literature to identify and militate against it, black literature evolves so as to prove that racism exists in the real world and is not a figment of the black imagination.” Such a view resists psychoanalytical readings that center the individual’s primary nurturing environment, rather than the external circumstances that precondition that environment. Conversely, psychoanalysis readings of racism risk designating race as pathology. Enter Epifano San Juan, who observes that race is “an unstable and decentered complex of social meanings constantly being transformed by political struggle…. It is a framework for articulating identity and difference, a process that governs the political and ideological constitution of subjects/agents in history.” This course engages the eclectic quality of African-American literature since the Harlem Renaissance. 

Texts: Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ann Petry, The Street; August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Van Jordan, Macnolia: Poems; Harryette Mullen, Sleeping with the Dictionary.

Requirements & Grading: .75, Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed; ds)--one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer reading; see revision handout); .15, Response papers (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10, Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA (Modern Language Association Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Grading Scale: A (94-95; A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 349S • Toni Morrison

35595 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 204
show description

Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic: Toni Morrison), 376M (Topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison), 379S (embedded topic: The Novels of Toni Morrison).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines select novels by Nobel Laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison. The novels thematize womanism as a theory that incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women—particularly women of color—across class and regional boundaries. Part of the positional uniqueness that womanism shares with a predominant feminism surfaces in historicized black/white female relations, particularly those rooted in slavery. Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises: infanticide, male-female relations, family, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc. Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

Texts: The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Tar Baby, 1981; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; Paradise, 1998; COURSE PACK (purchase at Speedway; Dobie)

Audio-Visual Aids (Fine Arts Library Reserve): Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers; Imitation of Life (Excerpts); Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); Toni Morrison, readings from Paradise.

Requirements & Grading: .40 Seminar paper (10-12 pages; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (15 pages minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .30 Presentations (TBA)/Reading quizzes/class participation.

ATTENDANCE: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. Upon your fifth absence, you will be notified of your failure in the course, and you need not return to class. If you are more than five minues late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

PAPERS: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip. Read all material assigned before class time.  Participation in class discussion is required.

GRADING SCALE: A 95; A- 92; B+ 88; B 85; B- 82; C+ 78; C 75; C- 72; D+ 68; D 65; D- 62; F (0-60)

E 376S • Afr Am Lit Since Harlem Renais

35790 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago? Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others? How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? For example, writers like the late Claudia Tate argue that because of the continuation of racial oppression and “the demand for black literature to identify and militate against it, black literature evolves so as to prove that racism exists in the real world and is not a figment of the black imagination.” Such a view resists psychoanalytical readings that center the individual’s primary nurturing environment, rather than the external circumstances that precondition that environment. Conversely, psychoanalysis readings of racism risk designating race as pathology.  Enter Epifano San Juan, who observes that race is “an unstable and decentered complex of social meanings constantly being transformed by political struggle…. It is a framework for articulating identity and difference, a process that governs the political and ideological constitution of subjects/agents in history.” This course engages the eclectic quality of African-American literature since the Harlem Renaissance.

Texts: Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ann Petry, The Street; August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Van Jordan, Macnolia: Poems; Saffire, Push.

Grading: .75, Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed; ds)--one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer reading; see revision handout); .15, Response papers (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10, Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report.

Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA (Modern Language Association Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip.

Grading Scale: A (94-95; A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

E 376M • Writing Slavery

34893 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F )
show description

Cross-listed with AFR 374F

 

Course Description: This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discouse. The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals. Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy.

Texts: REQUIRED READINGS: Elizabeth Alexander, The Venus Hottentot: Poems; Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Classic Slave Narratives; Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Fred D’Aguiar, Feeding the Ghosts; Edward P. Jones, The Known World; Course Pak (Speedway on Dobie).

Grading: .75: Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced) and one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer evaluation; see revision instruction handout); .15: Response papers based on course reading (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10: Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report. Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence. A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59). Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade. This is a writing-intensive course. No final exam is given.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 376S • Afr Am Lit Since Harlem Renais

34905 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 374F )
show description

Cross-listed with AFR 374F

Only one of the following may be counted:  AFR 374 (Topic 3: African American Literature since the Harlem Renaissance), E 376M (Topic 2: African American Literature, 1940 to Present), 376S.

Course Description: Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago? Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others? How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? For example, writers like the late Claudia Tate argue that because of the continuation of racial oppression and “the demand for black literature to identify and militate against it, black literature evolves so as to prove that racism exists in the real world and is not a figment of the black imagination.” Such a view resists psychoanalytical readings that center the individual’s primary nurturing environment, rather than the external circumstances that precondition that environment. Conversely, psychoanalysis readings of racism risk designating race as pathology.  Enter Epifano San Juan, who observes that race is “an unstable and decentered complex of social meanings constantly being transformed by political struggle…. It is a framework for articulating identity and difference, a process that governs the political and ideological constitution of subjects/agents in history.” This course engages the eclectic quality of African-American literature since the Harlem Renaissance.

Texts: Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play; Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ann Petry, The Street; August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Van Jordan, Macnolia: Poems; Saffire, Push.

Grading: .75, Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed; ds)--one major rewrite of essay I or II (includes peer reading; see revision handout); .15, Response papers (1-2 pages), reading quizzes, class participation; .10, Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report. Attendance: Regular attendance is required. More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies. If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class. You are responsible for all work covered in your absence. Papers: Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date assigned. Late papers will not be accepted. Do not slide papers under my door. Use the MLA (Modern Language Association Stylebook for all papers. Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only. Bind pages with a paper clip. Grading Scale: A (94-95; A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (61-63); F (0-60).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 376R • Afr Am Lit Thr Harlem Renais-W

35025 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 PAR 304
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Dr. Helena Woodard, Associate Professor
E376R, 35025; Afr 374 1, 35540; African American Literature
Through the Harlem Renaissance-W; 10:00-11:00 a.m. Par 304
Office: 331 Parlin; Office Hours: 11:00-12:00 & By Appointment 
Ph: (512) 471-8703; Email: hwood@mail.utexas.edu

Contains Substantial Writing Component
Cross-listed with AFR 374

¤ COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is an introduction to select African-American literature--slave narratives, poetry, novels, essays—in a tripartite format that extends from slavery to Reconstruction through the Harlem Renaissance.  The course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery.  Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from self-actualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discouse.  The course historicizes issues pertinent to the development of an African-American literary tradition, such as critical race theory, double consciousness or the struggle for self-identity, as complicated by issues pertaining to class, race, and gender.  These issues are thematized through stylistic forms that include the oral vernacular tradition, blues ideology, and folk culture.  In the third and final unit, the course examines an unprecedented flourishing of seminal literature, art, music, and culture produced throughout the Harlem Renaissance.

¤ REQUIRED READINGS:

Classic Slave Narratives, Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
The Poems of Phillis Wheatley, Phillis Wheatley.
The Marrow of Tradition, Charles Chesnutt.
Passing, Nella Larsen.
The New Negro: Voices of the Harlem Renaissance, Alain Locke, ed.
Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, Houston Baker.
Course pack, Speedway on Dobie. 

¤ COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

0.75   Three critical essays (25% each; 4-5 pages per essay, typed, double spaced)
    One major critical essay revision; see separate handout.
0.15   Response papers, (in-class and out-of-class, based on course readings, 1-2 pages);
    reading quizzes; class participation
0.1   Oral group presentations, accompanied by one-page written report

     ♦ PREREQUISITES:

Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents (e.g. T C 603A and 603B), and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing.  No exceptions.

English Major Area:  II.  Literary Period or Survey

*The course contains select readings from African American literature from slavery through the Harlem Renaissance.  Three lecture hours a week for one semester.  The subject of each class meeting may be determined from the assigned reading for the day (see course schedule).  The instructor retains the right to vary this syllabus.

     ♦ ATTENDANCE:

Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.

¤ CLASS POLICIES:

Absolutely no make-up for reading quizzes.  In exchange, the lowest quize grade will be dropped.  Except under extreme emergencies, and then only with the permission of the professor, late assignments will not be accepted.  I reserve the right to make these decisions on a case by case basis.  You must bring your books to class and complete all reading assignments by the first day of class discussion for that text.  Students are expected to turn in all required assignments on the agreed upon due date at the beginning of class.  Papers turned in during or after class on the due day will be considered late.   Use the MLA (Modern Language Association) Handout for all papers.  Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only.  Bind pages with a paper clip.

     ♦ Special Accommodations for Students with a Disability:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.  Please notify the professor of nyi special accommodations sthat you may need prior to the end of the second week of class.

     ♦ Policy on Religious Observance:

A student who is absent from a class or examinaation due to the observance of a religious holy day may complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence if proper notice has been given.  Notice must be given at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dafes the student will be absent.  For religious holy days that fall within the first two weeks of the semeser, notice should be given on the first day of the semester.

¤ GRADING SCALE:

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric.  Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage.  Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999.  The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.   This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 379S • Senior Seminar-W

35170 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm GAR 0.120
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E379S 35170; The Novels of Toni Morrison (Senior Seminar-W)

Dr. H. Woodard, Associate Professor
(Spring 2010); 12:00-1:00pm; MWF (GAR 0.120)
Office: 331 Parlin; Hours: 11:00-12:00am MWF & By Apptmt.
Phone: 471-8703; email hwood@mail.utexas.edu

 Contains Substantial Writing Component

This course examines select novels by Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison.  The novels thematize womanism as a theory that incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries.  Part of the positional uniqueness that womanism shares with a predominant feminism surfaces in historicized black/white female relations, particularly rooted in slavery.  Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises:  infanticide, male-female relations, family, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc.  Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

¤ REQUIRED READING:

The Bluest Eye, 1970.
Sula, 1973.
Song of Solomon, 1977.
Tar Baby, 1979.
Beloved, 1987.
Jazz, 1992.
A Mercy, 2008.
COURSE PACK (purchase at Speedway; Dobie)
*Optional; Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination

¤ AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS:

Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series
Toni Morrison on Beloved
Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance
Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon)
The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary)

¤ COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

.40 Seminar paper (10 pages; typed, ds)
.30 A Reading Notebook (15 page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet)
.30 Presentations (TBA)/quizzes/class participation.

¤ ATTENDANCE:

Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course.  Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself.  I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minues late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.  Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book.  No makeup for quizzes is permitted.  Course pack articles are required reading.

English Major Area:  Senior Seminar

*The course contains select novels from the Toni Morrison literary canon.  Three lecture hours per week for one semester.  The subject of each class meeting may be determined from the assigned reading for the day (see course schedule).  The instructor retains the right to vary this syllabus.

¤ Class Policies:

Absolutely no make-up for reading quizzes.  The lowest quiz grade will be dropped.  Except under extreme emergencies, and then only with the permission of the professor, late assignments will not be accepted.  I reserve the right to make these decisions on a case by case basis.  Students are expected to turn in all required assignments on the agreed upon due date at the beginning of class.  Read all material assigned before class time.  Participation in class discussion is required.  Papers turned in during or after class on the due day will be considered late.  Use the MLA (Modern Language Association) Stylebook for all papers.  Type papers on white, 8.5" x 11" paper, using one side only.  Bind pages with a paper clip.

¤ Special Accommodations for Students with a Disability:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.  Please notify the professor of nyi special accommodations sthat you may need prior to the end of the second week of class.

¤ Policy on Religious Observance:

A student who is absent from a class or examinaation due to the observance of a religious holy day may complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence if proper notice has been given.  Notice must be given at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dafes the student will be absent.  For religious holy days that fall within the first two weeks of the semeser, notice should be given on the first day of the semester.

¤ Grading Scale:

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric.  Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage.  Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999.  The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.   This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 376M • Writing Slavery-W

35245 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 PAR 105
(also listed as AFR 374F )
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E376M, 35245; WRITING SLAVERY-W (Fall 2009)

Dr. Helena Woodard, Associate Professor
(Same as AFR 374F; 35845); 10:00-11:00 a.m. (MWF); PAR 105
Office Hours: 12:00-1:00 p.m. MWF & By Apptmt. Parlin 331
Phone: (512) 471-8703; email: hwood@mail.utexas.edu
Contains Substantial Writing Component
Cross-listed with AFR 374

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course proposes two primary objectives rooted in past and present literary representations of slavery. Thematizing “the trope of the talking book,” (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The Signifying Monkey), the course first examines seminal slave narratives, e.g. the literature of the enslaved as discursive strategies, from selfactualization and resistance to early formations of a black literary discouse. The course then explores how slavery is (re)written, controversially in a presentist context by contemporary authors, particularly in historical fiction or neo-slave narratives that seek to restore agency and reclaim subjectivity for enslaved individuals. Ultimately, the course engages larger issues about the different venues that writings about slavery offer for academic disciplines, literary instruction and/or pedagogy.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 376S • Afr Am Lit Snc Harlem Renais-W

35255 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 PAR 204
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E 376S, 35255; AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE-W

Dr. Helena Woodard, Associate Professor (Fall 2009)
(Same as AFR 374F; 35855); 11:00-12:00 noon, (MWF) PAR 204
Office Hours: 12:00-1:00 p.m. (MWF) & By Appointment; Parlin 331
Phone: (512) 471-8703; email: hwood@mail.utexas.edu
Contains Substantial Writing Component
Cross-listed with AFR 374
E 376M (Topic 2: African American Literature: 1940 to Present) may not also be counted.

 

Description:

Is the problem of the 21st century still the color line—as W.E.B. Du Bois (The Souls of Black Folks) termed it a century ago? Or have we reached a so-called “post racial” or racially transcendent phase or era in which race has significantly
declined—ideas foregrounded in writings by Julius Wilson and Paul Gilroy, among others? How is the color line implicated in a postmodernist framework differently than in a modernist one? Utilizing select, post Harlem Renaissance novels, poetry, and plays by African-American authors, this course engages the increasingly eclectic turn that encompasses or characterizes contemporary African-American literature. The course thematizes the novel as “speakerly text” (Hurston), as naturalism in a gendered context in urban America (Petry), as historical fiction (Morrison), and as speculative fiction (Parks). It further features blues ideology as literary trope (Wilson) and poetry as memoir (Jordan).

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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