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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Department of English Outstanding TA and AI Award Winners

S. Pearl Brilmyer, Bradley Irish, Corinne Lee Greiner, Dusty Hixenbaugh

Posted: July 25, 2011
S. Pearl Brilmyer, Bradley Irish, Corinne Lee Greiner, Dusty Hixenbaugh

S. Pearl Brilmyer, Bradley Irish, Corinne Lee Greiner, Dusty Hixenbaugh

The Department of English congratulates the 2010-2011 Outstanding Teaching Assistant and Assistant Instructor Award winners. Two prizes are awarded in each category.

The applicants are judged by a panel of instructors made up of assistant directors of the lower-division literature program and of previous award winners. Applicants submit a portfolio of teaching material they have generated, at least one set of student evaluations, and a letter from a faculty member who has observed a class session. The judges reported finding this year’s pool of instructors remarkable for the passion, commitment, and creativity that each one brings to his or her teaching. The winners rose to the top of this very strong group.  

 

Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award Winners:

Corinne Lee Greiner is a graduate student in Creative Writing. Her book PYX won the National Poetry Series and was published by Penguin in 2005. Ms. Lee was chosen in 2007 by the Poetry Society of America as one of the top ten emerging poets in the United States. Six of her poems were included in Best American Poetry 2010. Her most recent multimedia book--which contains flash fiction, poetry, photographs, and music--won the Bernadette Mayer Folio award and will be published online later this year. The composer for that work is Eric Chapelle, who is married to English professor Hannah Chapelle Wojciehowski.

 

 

Dusty Hixenbaugh is from Cheyenne, Wyoming, and earned a Bachelor of Arts in English and Spanish from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 2006. After graduating, he joined the Teach For America corps and taught English to high school students in La Joya, Texas, for three years. He continues to work for Teach For America as a "Literacy Specialist,” training incoming teachers. Hixenbaugh graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Master of Arts in Comparative Literature in Spring 2011, and will begin working toward a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature in the fall. He has been awarded a FLAS (Foreign Language Area Studies) fellowship from the US Department of Education to study Portuguese for the next two semesters, and is also co-organizer of UT's 2011 GRACLS conference for graduate students in Comparative Literature.

 

 

Outstanding Assistant Instructor Award Winners:

S. Pearl Brilmyer is a Ph.D. Candidate in Comparative Literature. She is currently at work on a dissertation on vitality, agency and Victorian literature (supervised by Ann Cvetkovich and Tracie Matysik) called "Character Drives: Vitality and the Victorian Novel". Her interests include queer theory, the 19th-century novel and literary sketch, the history of German philosophy and science, and 21st-century digital literacies. 

She won the Outstanding English Department AI Award for her work developing and teaching E314V: Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture: History, Feeling, Form. This course taught students the basics of literary analysis through a cannon of gay and lesbian fiction, nonfiction, poetry, music and performance art. 

 

Bradley Irish is an advanced doctoral candidate, currently completing a dissertation on sixteenth-century literature and history, under the direction of Frank Whigham.  Drawing upon literary analysis, archival research, and cross-disciplinary scholarship in the sciences and humanities, his project "Powerful Feelings: Emotional Structures of the Tudor Court in Early Modern Literary Culture” interrogates the socioliterary operation of emotion in the Tudor courtly sphere. During his graduate career, he has published essays in a variety of venues, including Renaissance Quarterly and Renaissance Drama.

This year, he taught E314L: Reading Literature in Context: Mapping the Early Modern World, a course that considered how literature from the late medieval and early modern periods variously responded to the features of its cultural moment.

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