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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Associate Professor Meta DuEwa Jones publishes 'The Muse is Music: Jazz Poetry From the Harlem Renaissance to Spoken Word'

Posted: September 29, 2011
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Praise for The Muse is Music: Jazz Poetry From the Harlem Renaissance to Spoken Word

"Like Melba Liston stepping to the microphone, trombone in hand, to punctuate one of her own arrangements with a newly improvised statement, Meta DuEwa Jones takes up the changes in the interrelationship between jazz and poetry and turns them out. Even those few readers who have read everything in print on the subject of jazz and verse will find that Jones has both new chapters and new verses, well worth multiple hearings."

Aldon Lynn Nielsen, author of Integral Music: Languages of African-American Innovation

"An extraordinarily original and important book about the musicality of African American poetic performance. Meta DuEwa Jones offers insightful and sophisticated readings and analyses of the relationship between black poetry and jazz. This wide-ranging and ambitious book will make an immediate impact on African American literary and cultural studies as well as performance studies."

Farah Jasmine Griffin, coauthor of Clawing at the Limits of Cool: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and the Greatest Jazz Collaboration Ever

Now available from University of Illinois Press.

 

About the Author

Meta DuEwa Jones is an Assistant Professor in the English Department and a Faculty Affiliate of the Center for African and African-American Studies (CAAAS).  Her primary research interests include Twentieth and Twenty-first Century American Poetry and Poetics, especially in relationship to gender, sexuality and performance studies; African-American Literature, Criticism and Theory, Textual Studies, Jazz, Gender and Sexuality studies, Visual Culture Studies.  She is currently Co-Director of the Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies, 2011-2012.

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