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David Birdsong, Chair 201 W 21ST STREET STOP B7600, HRH 2.114A, AUSTIN, TX 78712 • 512-471-5531

Daniela Bini

Professor Ph.D, University of Texas, Austin

Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature
Daniela Bini

Contact

Biography

Pirandello

A Roman by birth, Daniela Bini received a Laurea Summa Cum Laude in Philosophy at the University of Rome (La Sapienza), and a Ph.D in Comparative Literature at the University of Texas, Austin. She is Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature and was Chair of the French and Italian Department from 2003 to 2011. In her research she has always combined her interest in philosophy with that of literature, focusing, in particular, on the issue of the inadequacy of verbal language as exemplified by her books: A Fragrance from the Desert: Poetry and Philosophy in Giacomo LeopardiCarlo Michelstaedter and the Failure of LanguagePirandello and His Muse: The Plays for Marta Abba, and in some recent essays on musisc, opera and film. She is the author of over fifty essays on artists as different as Ippolito Nievo, Giacomo Leopardi, Giovanni, Verga, Italo Svevo, Pietro Mascagni, Giuseppe Verdi, Luigi Pirandello, Leonardo Sciascia, Giuseppe Tornatore, the Taviani brothers, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Franco Zeffirelli, Marco Bellocchio. She is also the co-author of two Italian textbooks.

At present she is working on a study of the phenomena of Vitellonismo and Familismo in Italian culture and on artistic works that combine different media: popular and classical theater, music, film and poetry.

Daniela received several university fellowships, two National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, and three teaching awards. She was the President of the American Association for Italian Studies (2000-2003), and has been the Vice-president of the International Association of Italian Language and Literature Studies (AISLLI) since 2006. She serves on the editorial board of several scholarly journals. In 2007 The President of the Italian Republic, Giorgio Napolitano bestowed on her the title of Cavaliere (Ordine della Stella della Solidarietà Italiana).

 Her more popular courses are: “The Antihero in XX century Italian Literature,” “Sicily Through Literature and Film,” “Writing Fascism, the War, the Resistance,” “Italian Civilization Through Opera.”

 

 

ITL 329 • Adv Composition And Conversatn

36275 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm HRH 2.112
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SourceURL:file://localhost/Users/danielabini/Desktop/ITL%20329%20(2015).doc

ITL 329                   Advanced Composition and Conversation

 

Description:

The goals of this course are to improve students' skills in writing and speaking in Italian and to expand their knowledge of Italian culture. We will reach these goals by examining literary and visual texts (analyzing them both for their content and linguistic format), studying historical contexts, reviewing grammatical structures, and expanding lexicon. Videos and songs will be used as pedagogical tools for a deeper understanding of the Italian language and culture. The course is conducted entirely in Italian.

 

Students are expected to have read the assignment for every given day and be prepared to discuss it in class in Italian. We are bound to this syllabus, which gives you an overview of the course goals, organization, requirements, and assessment. It also includes a plan of the material covered, but you will find more detailed informationin Blackboard. For this reason, you are required to check Blackboard and your email every day.

 

NOTE: This course carries the Writing Flag

 

Recommended Readings:

Daniela Bartalesi-Graf, L’Italia dal Fascismo ad oggi: Percorsi paralleli nella storia, nella letteratura e nel cinema

 

Other texts will be posted on Blackboard (B).

 

Films:

The following films are mandatory for this course and will be available on Reserve at Fine Arts Library:

Una giornata particolare (Ettore Scola 1977)

La vita è bella (Roberto Benigni, 1997)

Buongiorno Notte (Marco Bellocchio, 2003)

La grande bellezza (Paolo Sorrentino, 2013)

 

Grading

The final grade will be computed as follows:

25% Writing Assignments (4)

20%    Final Paper

15%   Class participation and homework

20%    Mid-Term Exam

20%   Oral Presentations (2)

ITL 375 • Wrtng Fascism: Wrtng Resis

36285 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm HRH 2.112
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SourceURL:file://localhost/Users/danielabini/Desktop/ITL%20375%20Fascismo,%20Resistenza%20(2015).doc

ITL 375                 Writing Fascism, the Resistance, the War

 

                           Instructor:  Daniela Bini;  office HRH 3.112C

 

 

            Italian literature has been a manifestation of a cultural elite with  little or no contact with the masses.  The distance between the learned language, taught in school, and the many dialects, spoken in the various regions has contributed to the problem.  It was precisely against this historical and social phenomenon that Antonio Gramsci waged his battle.  Literature, that is rooted in the history and culture of a country, must maintain this contact with the social-historical forces that have formed it and aim at the improvement of those very forces.  In the narrative production of  the first half of the twentieth century, the literature of the war and of the Resistance, represents the best attempt to achieve such goal:  writing in order to remember, to tell of a past experience made of mistakes and suffering, not only in order to exorcise it, but also in order to learn from it.

            Placing them in their historical context, we will read some novels and short stories dealing with the experience of the war, fascism and the resistance:              

 

            Ignazio Silone:  Fontamara

            Cesare Pavese: La casa in collina

            Giorgio Bassani:  Il giardino dei Finzi-Contini

            Renata Viganò:  L'Agnese va a morire

            Beppe Fenoglio:  Una questione privata

            Primo Levi:  Se questo è un uomo

            Leonardo Sciascia:  "L'antimonio" (at Speedway)

 

Advised Readings:                   Roberto Battaglia: Breve storia della Resistenza italiana

                                                 Giuseppe Mammarella:  Italy After Fascism

                                                 Giorgio Bocca:  L'Italia fascista

 

Films on Reserve in Fine Arts:  Roberto Rossellini:  Roma città aperta

                                                  Vittorio de Sica:  Il Giardino dei Finzi-Contini

                                                   Bernardo Bertolucci:  Il conformista

                                                  P. e V. Taviani:  La notte di San Lorenzo

                                                  Ettore Scola: Una giornata particolare

 

The course will be taught in Italian, and the grades will be computed as follows:  two papers:  40%, two exams: 40%, class participation and short quizzes: 20%.

ITL 381 • G Leopardi Poet/Philosopher

37238 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm HRH 2.106C
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Giacomo Leopardi has long been considered one of the greatest poets of all time.  Yet the importance of his philosophical thought, which was almost ignored until the Fifties, is still at the center of the critical debate.  The recent translation of the entire Zibaldone (2013) is a sign that times have changed and his philosophical prose is beginning to receive proper scrutiny. The complexity and modernity of Leopardi's ideas, his asystematic and negative nature, have led throughout the years his critics in opposite directions.  If Benedetto Croce's definition of his thought as "un ingorgo sentimentale"was superseed by  Cesare Luporini's "socially progressive and materialistic" one, today Leopardi is seen by one of Italy leading philosophers, Emanuele Severino, as the thinker who opened the road to contemporary thought.  Misunderstood by his contemporaries, admired by Schopenhauer, Wagner and Nietzsche, Leopardi finds in our postmodern time, his ideally suited environment. Emanuele Severino

In the seminar we will examine both his poetry and his prose, in order to show the complementarity of their discourses and to debunk the old assumption that opposes poetry and philosophy, "one of those seductive simple schematizations," as Paul Valéry called it, "so beloved of the human mind ad so conveniently crystallized by language." We will also examine some classical interpretations of Leopardi, concentrating on the recent contribution of scholars such as Antonio Prete, Antonio Negri, Giorgio Agamben, Alessandro Carrera and Emanuele Severino. The seminar will be conducted in Italian.

GRADE  COMPUTATION: 20% class participation; 20% oral report; 60% final paper (15-20 pages)

PRIMARY TEXTS:  Giacomo Leopardi:  CANTI

                                                  OPERETTE MORALI

                                                  PENSIERI

                                                  ZIBALDONE  (a selection)

SECONDARY TEXTS:  on Reserve at PCL and on Blackboard

ITC F349 • Rome: Words/Images/Music-Ita

84155 • Summer 2014
Meets
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ROME STUDY PROGRAM

 

ITC F349 – Rome

Rome in Words, Images and Music

 

Instructor: Daniela Bini

 

 

Course Description:

 

The course will briefly sketch the rich life of the Eternal City through literary texts, architecture, painting, sculpture, lyric opera and cinema. Choosing some pivotal periods in its history, we will learn of ancient Rome from Livy, Ovid and Virgil, but also from the Forum and the Ara Pacis.  Michelangelo and Raphael will take us into the magnificence of Renaissance Rome, and with Borromini and Bernini will enter its sumptuous Baroque palaces and churches.  Giacomo Puccini’s opera Tosca will lead us into the Risorgimento movement, the revolts against the Pope and its temporal power. Fascism will be examined with Moravia’s novel The Conformist, and Roberto Rossellini’s Open City. We will conclude with Federico Fellini’s films La dolce vita and Roma that well demonstrate the director’s ambivalent feelings for this unique city where decadence and beauty coexist.

 

Textbooks:

 

Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased in Austin)

Alberto Moravia, The Conformist (in English, to be purchased on amazon.com)

Additional reading material will be announced

 

Grading:

 

30%    Short quizzes

50%    Two exams

10%    Oral Reports

10%    Participation

 

ITL 375 • Images Of Women In Mod Itl Cul

37555 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm HRH 2.112
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    Images of Women in Modern Italian Culture

 

From the angel woman of “Dolce Stil Nuovo” and Beatrice, Dante’s guide to Paradise, woman has been at the center of much of Italian artistic production.  The power of the Catholic Church, made stronger by the presence of the Vatican, has created through the centuries an ambiguous image of woman in which maternity and eroticism have had difficulty coexisting. After the Counter Reformation the cult of he Virgin Mary contributed to the idealization of the Mother Madonna figure and to the denigration of the erotic female.  The ideal woman, thus, was the good mother and wife.  At the end of the 19th century Cesare Lombroso and Paolo Mantegazza tried to give scientific basis to the belief of woman’s inferiority and Fascism gave a social and political foundation to the celebration of the maternal role. The economic “boom” of the 60s, feminism of the 70s, and the globalization and immigration of today have transformed the image of women and made it much more complex.

The course will examine images of woman in different artistic and cultural genres: literature, visual arts, opera and film and trace their evolution up to contemporary times.

 

TEXTS

 

Verga, Giovanni.“La lupa,” “Cavalleria rusticana”

Pirandello Luigi. “Il viaggio,” “L’altro figlio”

Verdi, Giuseppe. La traviata

Puccini, Giacomo, Tosca

Pasolini, Pier Paolo. Poetry, Mamma Roma

Moravia, Alberto. Short stories

Morante, Elsa. “Il soldato siciliano”

Sciascia Leonardo. A ciascuno il suo

Ginzburg, Natalia. La città e la casa.

Maraini, Dacia. “Donne mie” and Short Stories

Pietrangeli, Antonio. Io la conoscevo bene  & La visita

Scego, Igiaba. “Salsicce”

 

GRADING:

 

Mid-term Exam: 25%

Final Exam: 30%

Three written assignments 30%

Participation in class discussion and Presentation: 15:00

ITL 381 • Pirandello: Narr & Dram Discrs

37565 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm HRH 2.112
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ITL 381                Narrative/Dramatic Discourse in Pirandello           Spring 2014

                                                           

It was certainly his plays that brought Luigi Pirandello world fame and the Nobel Prize in 1934. George Bernard Shaw considered him the most original playwright of the time, and his revolutionary theatrical ideas influenced not only European authors such as Ionesco, Artaud, Beckett, Brecht and Durrenmatt, but reverberated on the other side of the Atlantic in the works of writers like Eugene O'Neill and Thornton Wilder. Already during his life, Pirandello's plays were being translated and performed successfully on Broadway. Yet his personal relation with the theatre was for decades greatly troubled. Already as a child he was attracted to the theatre where he went evening after evening. At the same time, however, he considered theatre an art form inferior to narrative, as he repeated in various theoretical essays and interviews. Actors and stage directors were the culprits, because they necessarily betrayed the world of the artist. Even after his famous Six Characters in Search of an Author and Henry IV made Pirandello the world's most original, though controversial, playwright, his feelings about theatre as a second-rate art form still remained. It took the work of some of the leading stage directors of the time, like the French Pitoeff and the German Reinhardt, but above all the momentous encounter with his muse, the actress Marta Abba, to make Pirandello revise his ideas on theatre.

            We will read from his theoretical essays, narrative and plays to uncover a more profound and basic issue that lay at the bottom of Pirandello's change — a philosophical issue: the paradox that theatre, precisely because of its constant change through various performances and different productions, was the art form closest to life, which Pirandello had defined as "constant flux." Dramatic art was thus capable of escaping the fossilization of the written word to which narrative instead was doomed.

            The class will be taught in Italian.

            Grading Policy

The final grade will be determined by class participation and discussion, short response questions (25%); one oral report (15%); and one final paper of 15 to 20 pages (60%).

            Texts

Selection from Pirandello's theoretical essays and short stories (Packet of xeroxed copies). 
Novels: Il fu Mattia Pascal; Suo marito, Quaderni di Serafino Gubbio operatore; Uno, nessuno e centomila.
Plays: La patente; Il berretto a sonagli; Il gioco delle parti; Così è (se vi pare); Sei personaggi in cerca d'autore; Enrico IV; Ciascuno a suo modo; Questa sera si recita a soggetto; Come tu mi vuoi; Trovarsi; Non si sa come.
Molti testi di Pirandello sono on line: http://www.liberliber.it/biblioteca/p/pirandello/index.htm

                                                            

ITL 321 • Intro To Italian Literature

37440 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm HRH 2.112
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ITL 321                         INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LITERATURE    

                                                     

 

The course will introduce students to different literary genres and periods of Italian literature.  Selections of poetry, prose and drama from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Romanticism, and the Twentieth century will be examined in class from the language as well as the literary perspectives.  We will try to point out basic characteristics and changes in language, themes, and style throughout the centuries.  Given the fact that most of the literature we know from the past was written by male writers, we will focus on the representations of woman, beginning with the idealized woman-angel of the Middle Ages, and, whenever possible, confront it with those made by women writers.  Authors represented in this course include: Dante Alighieri, Francesco Petrarca, Giovanni Boccaccio, Gaspara Stampa, Giacomo Leopardi, Luigi Pirandello, Sibilla Aleramo, Elsa Morante, Anna Maria Ortese, Natalia Ginzburg, Dacia Maraini, Italo Calvino, Eugenio Montale.

 

Required Texts:

 

Letteratura Italiana per Stranieri by Paolo E. Balboni & Anna Biguzzi (at Co-op or Amazon)

Natalia Ginzburg, La città e la casa(at Co-op)

ITC F349 • Rome: Words/Images/Music-Ita

84472 • Summer 2013
Meets
show description

ROME STUDY PROGRAM

 

ITC F349 – Rome

Rome in Words, Images and Music

 

Instructor: Daniela Bini

 

 

Course Description:

 

The course will briefly sketch the rich life of the Eternal City through literary texts, architecture, painting, sculpture, lyric opera and cinema. Choosing some pivotal periods in its history, we will learn of ancient Rome from Livy, Ovid and Virgil, but also from the Forum and the Ara Pacis.  Michelangelo and Raphael will take us into the magnificence of Renaissance Rome, and with Borromini and Bernini will enter its sumptuous Baroque palaces and churches.  Giacomo Puccini’s opera Tosca will lead us into the Risorgimento movement, the revolts against the Pope and its temporal power. Fascism will be examined with Moravia’s novel The Conformist, and Roberto Rossellini’s Open City. We will conclude with Federico Fellini’s films La dolce vita and Roma that well demonstrate the director’s ambivalent feelings for this unique city where decadence and beauty coexist.

 

Textbooks:

 

Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased in Austin)

Alberto Moravia, The Conformist (in English, to be purchased on amazon.com)

Additional reading material will be announced

 

Grading:

 

30%    Short quizzes

50%    Two exams

10%    Oral Reports

10%    Participation

 

ITC F349 • Rome: Words/Images/Music-Ita

84625 • Summer 2012
Meets
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ROME STUDY PROGRAM

 

ITC F349 – Rome

Rome in Words, Images and Music

 

Instructor: Daniela Bini

 

 

Course Description:

 

The course will briefly sketch the rich life of the Eternal City through literary texts, architecture, painting, sculpture, lyric opera and cinema. Choosing some pivotal periods in its history, we will learn of ancient Rome from Livy, Ovid and Virgil, but also from the Forum and the Ara Pacis.  Michelangelo and Raphael will take us into the magnificence of Renaissance Rome, and with Borromini and Bernini will enter its sumptuous Baroque palaces and churches.  Giacomo Puccini’s opera Tosca will lead us into the Risorgimento movement, the revolts against the Pope and its temporal power. Fascism will be examined with Moravia’s novel The Conformist, and Roberto Rossellini’s Open City. We will conclude with Federico Fellini’s films La dolce vita and Roma that well demonstrate the director’s ambivalent feelings for this unique city where decadence and beauty coexist.

 

Textbooks:

 

Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased in Austin)

Alberto Moravia, The Conformist (in English, to be purchased on amazon.com)

Additional reading material will be announced

 

Grading:

 

30%    Short quizzes

50%    Two exams

10%    Oral Reports

10%    Participation

 

ITL 375 • Sicily In Literature And Film

37035 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm HRH 2.112
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ITL 375. Sicily Through Literature and Cinema

INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Daniela Bini

 

This course will be taught in Italian.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

Sicily with its rich history and culture, but also with her serious problems can be considered, as Leonardo Sciascia noted, a microcosm of Italy, where the problems that affect the country are magnified on the island. The course will examine the richness and complexity of the island culture through the works of some major Sicilian writers, such as Leonardo Sciascia, Luigi Pirandello, Giovanni Verga, Elio Vittorini and Vitaliano Brancati. We will compare the picture that these Sicilian writers give us of the island with that created by non Sicilian filmmakers (Luchino Visconti, Gianni Amelio, Pietro Germi, Marco Tullio Giordana, the Taviani brothers) who have been drawn to the island as a space for cinematic experimentation and artistic self-discovery.

 The course will involve close analysis of selected novels, short stories, and films with specific focus on such issues as unification history, the Mafia, and social/sexual mores. Attendance at the screenings is required.

 There will be few short response papers to be written in Italian, pop quizzes, and two exams.  Since the course will be conducted as a seminar, a great deal of emphasis will be placed on active class participation.

 The final grade will be computed as follows:

    Papers: 40%;

    Quizzes and Exams: 45%;

    Class Participation: 15%

ITL 326L • Intro Itl Lit II: 18th C-Pres

36950 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm HRH 2.112
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The course will begin with an introduction to the Italian Enlightnment, and in particular, the figure of the iterant intellectual, such as Carlo Goldoni and Lorenzo Da Ponte. We will then follow the intellectual as the participant in the construction of national identity during the cultural movement of Risorgimento.  We will read from the works of Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni and listen to selections of Bellini’s and Verdi’s operas. After Italy’s unification the discrepancy between north and south became more apparent. We will concentrate on the south by reading from the works of Giovanni Verga, Luigi Pirandello and Carlo Levi. The impact of two world wars and Fascism on Italian culture and literature, in particular, that brings the intellectual to a crisis, will be discussed through the works of writers as different as Morante, Ginzburg, Ungaretti, Montale. We will conclude with a few short stories by Italo Calvino. Several films will be shown to reinforce some of the themes discussed.

 

Required Texts:

Course packet (Speedway in Dobie Mall)

Carlo Goldoni, La locandiera,

Luigi Pirandello, Così è (se vi pare),

Carlo Levi, Cristo si è fermato a Eboli

Natalia Ginzburg, La città e la casa--            Books at Co-op on Guadalupe

ITL 390L • Writing And Filming Sicily

36995 • Fall 2011
Meets T 400pm-700pm HRH 2.112
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COURSE  DESCRIPTION

 

Sicily has always occupied a priviledged place in the Italian literary and cinematic imagination.  While such writers as Pirandello, Sciascia, and Verga have created what can legitimately be called a distinctly Sicilian category of Italian literature, such filmmakers as Visconti, Rosi, Tornatore have been drawn to the island as a space for cinematic experimentation and artistic self-discovery.  From Visconti's 1948 neorealist masterpiece La terra trema to Tornatore's 1988 Oscar-winning Cinema Paradiso, from Verga's late nineteenth century short stories to Sciascia's Mafia-based thrillers, Sicily has become both a mythic space of the mind, as well as a signifier, in extremis for its own, and the rest of Italy's, social, political, and historical problems. Recently the development of Mediterranean studies and Franco Cassano’s Il pensiero meridiano have began a revaluation of the south and of the contributions that it can offer to a western culture too much concerned with production, velocity, progress. The course will involve close analysis of selected novels, short stories, and films with specific focus on such issues as unification history, the Mafia, and social/sexual mores.  Attendance at the screenings is required.  This course will be taught in Italian.

 TESTI  

Elio Vittorini, Conversazione in Sicilia

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, Il Gattopardo

Vitaliano Brancati, Il Bell'Antonio

Leonardo Sciascia, A ciascuno il suo

Marcelle Padovani, La Sicilia come metafora (reserved at PCL in English)

Luigi Pirandello, selezione da Novelle per un anno:

http://www.filosofico.net/pirandellonovelle/pirandello_novelle.htm

Giovanni Verga, selezione da Novelle rusticane e Vita dei campi:

http://www.liberliber.it/biblioteca/v/verga/tutte_le_novelle/html/index.htm

Giuseppe Fava, alcuni saggi nel pacchetto a Speedway.

Franco Cassano, Il pensiero meridiano

Vincenzo Consolo, Di qua dal faro

Gesualdo Bufalino, La luce e il lutto

 

 FILM

Gianni Amelio, Ladro di bambini                                    Optional: Mauro Bolognini, Bell’Antonio

Luchino Visconti, Il Gattopardo                                                    Francis Ford Coppola, Godfather 2

Franco Zeffirelli, Cavalleria rusticana                                            Giuseppe Tornatore, Cinema Paradiso

Vittorio e Paolo Taviani, Kaos                                                      Elio Petri, A ciascuno il suo

Pietro Germi, Divorzio all’italiana                                                  P. Germi, Sedotta e abbandonata

Marco Tullio Giordana, I cento passi

Giuseppe Tornatore, L’uomo delle stelle

ITL 390L • Questn Of Italian Romanticism

36790 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm HRH 2.106C
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ITL 390L The Question of Italian Romanticism: Foscolo, Manzoni,

                                             Leopardi

Instructor: Daniela Bini; Office: HRH 2.122; Office Hours: Mon. 10-12 and by appointment

 

                                    The course will centered on the so called three Crowns of Italian Romanticism, in order to show how ambiguous and unreliable these categories are. Not only Romanticism is a difficult category to define, but the Italian version of it is even more arduous as the study of these three writers with their diversity will prove. They will be studied in their own right, but through their diversity we will explore the complex issue of Italian Romanticism in order to try to understand the absence in European and American criticism of a discourse on Italian Romanticism. We will thus touch upon the discourses of national identity, neo-classicism and the construction of the myth of Italy by foreign writers.

                                    We will briefly discuss the major role played by Madame De Stael’s view of Italy in her famous novel Corinne, some manifestos of Italian Romanticism, and the ideas expressed in F. Schiller's Naive and Sentimental Poetry, in order to understand the long debate between Classicists and Romantics, 'ancients' and  'moderns.'  These discussions will be propaedeutic to the reading of our authors, Ugo Foscolo, Giacomo Leopardi and Alessandro Manzoni.  The social aspect of Italian Romanticism will also be discussed in the light of the historical movement Risorgimento. We will watch Visconti’s film Senso, some of Vincenzo Bellini’s and Giuseppe Verdi’s operas, and read some sonnets by Milanese writer Carlo Porta, and Roman writer Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli.

 

GRADING POLICY

The final grade will be determined by class participation-discussion, short response essays, one oral report (40%) and one final paper of 15 to 20 pages (60%).

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259, http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

Academic dishonesty: Plagiarism, the use of others’ ideas and words without appropriate acknowledgement, will not be tolerated.

Religious Holidays. By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day.  If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, you will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

TESTI PRIMARI (at Coop and a packet at IT Copy, 512 West  MLK Blvd. Phone: 476-6662):

Ugo Foscolo, Le ultime lettere di Jacopo Ortis, “Dei sepolcri,” alcuni sonetti

Giacomo Leopardi, Operette morali,  Canti, Pensieri, Zibaldone (a selection)

Alessandro Manzoni, I promessi sposi, Lettera sul Romanticism, few examples of poetry.

Bellini, Vincenzo, Norma

Verdi, Giuseppe, Aida, Excerpts from other operas.

Some sonnets by Carlo Porta and Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli

 

TESTI SECONDARI (on reserve at PCL):

E. Raimondi, Romanticismo italiano e romanticismo europeo; A. Ascoli & K.C. Von Henneberg, Making and Remaking

Italy: The cultivation of National Identity around the Risorgimento; M. Praz, "Romantic Sensibility " in The Romantic

Agony; H. Honour, Romanticism, "Introduction"; M.H. Abrams, The Mirror and the Lamp and Natural Supernaturalism;

 H. Bloom ed., Romanticism and Consciousness; J. Luzzi, Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy; M. Puppo, Il Romanticismo Z. Baranski & R. West. The Cambridge Companion to Modern Italian Culture

 

 

                     SYLLABUS

26 agosto      Introduzione al corso

31 agosto               Luzzi: Introduzione: “Italy Ambivalent Modernity”

Discorsi e lettere sul Romanticismo: De Stael, Leopardi, Di Breme, Manzoni

http://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Sulla_maniera_e_utilità_delle_traduzioni

http://www.classicitaliani.it/ottocent/dibreme02.htm

http://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Lettera_sul_romanticismo_a_Cesare_D'Azeglio

1 settembre   lezione di Alex Wettlaufer su Corinne di Germaine De Stael.

 

7 settembre   Luzzi: I capitolo; Foscolo: alcune lettere d’amore.

9 settembre   Le ultime lettere di Jacopo Ortis

 

14 settembre   Foscolo, Dei sepolcri

16 settembre   Foscolo, sonetti

 

21 settembre     Giacomo Leopardi: selezione da Zibaldone ed Epistolario

23 settembre Leopardi, Canti: All’Italia, “L’ultimo canto di Saffo,”Il primo amore,“Il passero solitario”

 

28 settembre   Leopardi, Canti: “L’infinito,” “La sera del dì di festa,” “Alla luna”

30 settembre   Leopardi, Canti: “La vita solitaria,” “Alla sua donna,” “A Silvia,”

 

5 ottobre             Leopardi, Canti: “Le ricordanze,” “Il canto notturno,”

7 ottobre             Leopardi, Canti: “La quiete dopo la tempesta,” “Il sabato del villaggio”

 “A se stesso,” “Aspasia,”        

 

12 ottobre       “Il tramonto della luna,” “La ginestra”

14 ottobre   Leopardi, dalle Operette morali

 

19 ottobre       Leopardi, dalle Operette Morali

21 ottobre       Leopardi: dalle Operette morali

 

26 ottobre       Alessandro Manzoni: qualche poesia; I promessi sposi

28 ottobre       I promessi sposi

 

2 novembre   I promessi sposi

4 novembre   I promessi sposi

 

9 novembre   Vincenzo Bellini: Norma; some excerpts fromVerdi’s operas

11 novembre   Verdi’s Aida

  

16 novembre   Camillo Boito’s “Senso” and Luchino Visconti: Senso

 

18 novembre   Sonetti di Carlo Porta e di Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli

23 novembre   Oral reports

 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

 

30 novembre   Oral reports

2 dicembre   Oral reports

 

 

 

                                    

 

                                                                        

ITL 375 • Antihero In 20th-Cen Itl Novel

37060 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm HRH 2.106C
(also listed as EUS 347 )
show description

see attachment

ITL 381 • Pirandello: Narr & Dram Discrs

37380 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm HRH 2.112
show description

see attachment

CV

DANIELA BINI

Department of French and Italian

University of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX 78712

Tel.(512)471-5531(office)

e-mail: bini@mail.utexas.edu

_________________________________________________________________________

EDUCATION:

Ph.D. in Comparative Literature (Italian, French, Latin), University of Texas, 1978.

Laurea in Philosophy, summa cum laude, University of Rome, Italy, 1967.

WORKING EXPERIENCE

-Chair French and Italian Department, The University of Texas at Austin 2003-2011

-Professor in Italian, Department of French and Italian, The University of Texas at Austin, 1998-

-Associate Professor in Italian, Department of French and Italian, The University of Texas at Austin, 1992 -

1998.

-Assistant Professor in Italian, Department of French and Italian, The University of Texas, Austin, 1987-1992.

-Lecturer in Italian, Department of French and Italian, University of Texas, Austin, 1981-1987.

-Instructor in Italian, University of Texas at Austin, Summer 1978.

-Teaching Assistant in Italian, University of Texas at Austin, 1973-1975.

-Instructor in Italian, University of Texas at Austin, 1970-73.

-Teacher of Humanities at Liceo G. B. Vico, Rome, Italy, 1968-69.

-University Assistant in Greek philosophy, University of Rome, Italy, 1967-68.

FELLOWSHIPS, GRANTS AND AWARDS:

Liberal Arts Council Teaching Award (2009)

Cavaliere (Ordine della Stella della Solidarietà Italiana) conferred by the President of the Italian Republic,

Giorgio Napolitano, June 4, 2007.

Dean’s Fellow (Spring 2003)

Harry H. Ransom Teaching Award (Spring 2002)

University Special Research Grant (Fall 1996).

Nominated for the Centennial Friar Teaching Fellowship (1996, 2002, 2008)

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship (Fall 1995-Spring 1996).

2

President’s Associates Teaching Excellence Award (1994-95).

University Research Institute, The University of Texas (Spring 1995).

University Research Institute, The University of Texas (Summer 1989).

National Endowment for the Humanities, 1979-80 (with Martha L. King) Research Grant, Translation Program.

University Fellowship, The University of Texas at Austin (1976-77, 1977-78).

3

OFFICES IN PROFESSIONAL AND HONOR SOCIETIES

-Member of the Scientific Board of Quaderni del Novecento (2011-13)

-Elected Vice President of the Associazione Internazionale di Lingua e Letteratura Italiana (2006-)

-Elected to the Modern Language Association Executive Committee of the Division on the 20th Century Italian

Literature for the years 2006-2011.

-Member of the Editorial Board of The Pirandello Society of America (2005-)

-President of the American Association for Italian Studies (2000-2003)

-Member of the Editorial Board for the North Carolina Series in Romance Languages and Literatures (1998-

2000).

-Member of the Editorial Board of Italica (1998--).

-Advisor to the Encyclopedia of Italian Literature (Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers).

-Member of the Board of Directors and the Editorial Board of the Pirandello Society of America (1999-2001).

-Chapter Academic Advisor for the Gamma Kappa Alpha National Italian Honor Society (1995-2001).

-Elected to the Modern Language Association Executive Committee of the Division on 17th-, 18th- and 19th-

Century Italian Literature for the years 1996-2000.

-Elected to the Nominating Committee of the American Association for Italian Studies for the election of the

new officers (1996-1999).

-Regional Representative for the American Association for Italian Studies(1993-95; 1995-1998).-Nominating

Board of the American Association for Italian Studies, 1990.

SYMPOSIUM:

Co-organizer with Millicent Marcus of the Thirteenth American Association of Italian Studies Conference at The

University of Texas at Austin, April, 1993.

WORK IN PROGRESS:

Research on the Italian Opera and in particular the relationship between words and sounds; and on music in film.

Working on a book study of the vitellonismo phenomenon in Italian cinema and literature.

PUBLICATIONS:

BOOKS:

-Pirandello and His Muse: The Plays for Marta Abba. Gainsville: University Press of Florida; 1998. Reviewed

in Annali d’Italianistica, 16, 1998, South Central Review, Summer 1999, Drama Review, Summer 2000;

Pirandello Studies, 20 (2000); Italica, 78, 2 (Summer 2001); Italian Culture 19,1 (2001); Forum Italicum,

Spring 2002.

-Carlo Michelstaedter and the Failure of Language, Gainesville: University Press of Florida , 1992. Reviewed

in: Annali d’Italianistica, 71, 21 (Summer 94); Quaderni d’italianistica, 1, 2 (1992); Forum Italicum,

28,1 (Spring ‘94); Italica, 71, 21 (Summer ‘94); Italian Studies in South Africa,7,2 (1994); Canadian

Journal of Italian Studies, 13, 2 (1995); Italian Culture, 12, 1994, Differentia: Review of Italian Thought,

Spring/Autumn (1999).

-Giacomo Leopardi. Zibaldone. A Selection, transl. with an Introduction by Martha King and Daniela Bini, New

York: Peter Lang, 1992.

-Fragrance from the Desert: Poetry and Philosophy in Giacomo Leopardi, Stanford French-Italian Studies,

Anma Libri, 1983.

The Introduction, “A Synthesis for Leopardi,” pp.1-21, was reprinted in Nineteenth Century Literature

Criticism, Vol. 129; Gale Publisher, 2003.

TEXTBOOKS:

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-Italiano in diretta. An Introductory Course, with Antonella Pease, New York: 2nd edition, New York:

McGraw Hill, 1993. (First edition: 1989).

-Workbook for Italiano in diretta, with A. Pease (first and second edition).

-Vivere all’italiana. An Italian Reader with Antonella Pease, New York: Random House, 1985.

EDITED VOLUMES:

- Italian Culture, co-editor with Millicent Marcus, vol. XII, 1994

-The Romantic Movement. A Selective Critical Bibliography (Italian Section) Locust Hill Press, 1987, 1988.

PUBLISHED ARTICLES AND ESSAYS IN BOOKS:

61. “High and Low Art, Inadequacy of Words, Self-referentiality in Pasolini’s Che cosa sono le

nuvole?” Italica, 90, 2, Summer 2013. Pp. 227-244.

60. “Operatic Appearances in Marco Bellocchio” Esperienze Letterarie, 3, XXXVII, 2012. Pp. 42-54.

59. “Marco Tutino’s La lupa: A Neo-romantic, Postmodern Opera” in D. Brancato & M. Ruccolo La terra di

Babele: Saggi sul plurilinguismo nella cultura italiana (NY and Canada: Legas, 2011). Pp. 31-42.

58. “Leonardo Sciascia’s A ciascuno il suo: The Failure of the Intellectual” in Dana Renga ed. Mafia Movies:

A Reader (Toronto UP, 2011). Pp. 243-52.

57. “ The Legacy of Pirandello’s Humor in Italian Film Comedy” Esperienze Letterarie, 2, XXXV, 2010. Pp.

45-58.

56. “Giuseppe Tornatore, ovvero lo sguardo” in Daniela De Pau and Simone Dubrovic, eds. Zoom

"d'oltreoceano": istantanee sui registi italiani e sull'Italia (Rome: Vecchiarelli, 2010). Pp. 145-160.

55. “Un antieroe nella Sicilia del Risorgimento” in Giovanni Capecchi ed. Mezzo secolo del “Gattopardo.”

Studi e interpretazioni (Florence: Le Cáriti Editore, 2010). Pp.109-121

54. “Intersezioni culturali: Pasolini tra cinema e sceneggiata, tragedia classica e teatro dei pupi, Modugno e

Pirandello” Civiltà italiana e geografie d’Europa, Atti del XIX Convegno dell’Associazione

Internazionale di Lingua e Letteratura Italiana (Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2009). Pp.199-206.

53. “Fifty Years of Vtellonismo: Fellini, Monicelli e Muccino,” Rivista di studi italiani, June 2006 (came out

in Dec. 2008). Pp. 128-149.

52. “Der Last van de waarheid. De actualiteit van Carlo Michelstaedter” in Europees humanism in

fragmenten, Nexus, 50, 2008. Pp. 243-56 (translated from English in Dutch by Asker Pelgrom).

51. “Giacomo Leopardi” Encyclopedia of Italian Literature. New York and London: Routledge, 2007. Pp

1018-28.

50. “Reticence, a Rhetorical Strategy in Othello/Otello: Shakespeare, Verdi-Boito, Zeffirelli,” Italica

(Summer 2006). Pp.238-255.

49. “Art Versus Life in Three Plays by Ibsen, D’Annunzio and Pirandello” Il Castello di Elsinore, XIII (51,

2005). Pp.97-110.

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48. “Why Il fu Mattia Pascal? A Question for Mario Monicelli” PSA, The Journal of Pirandello Society of

America,17, 2004. Pp. 91-104. Rewritten in Italian as:

“Perché Le due vite di Mattia Pascal? Una domanda a Mario Monicelli” E. Lauretta, editor, Il fu Mattia

Pascal. Romanzo, Teatro, Film. Agrigento: Centro Nazionale Studi Pirandelliani, 2005. Pp. 203-14.

47. “Da Tuda a Ilse: Marta, ovvero la rinuncia dell’eros” in E. Lauretta, ed. I giganti della montagna.

Progetto per un film; Agrigento: Centro Nazionali Studi Pirandelliani, 2004. Pp. 221-32.

46. “Umorismo e tradimento in Tu ridi dei Taviani” in L’angelo di fuoco, Torino: Edizioni DAMS, (4/2003).

Pp. 101-19.

45. “Pirandello e la musica del Kaos” in E. Lauretta, ed. Il cinema e Pirandello. Agrigento: Centro Nazionale

Studi Pirandelliani, 2003. Pp. 243-55.

44. “Women of the South and the Art of Carlo Levi” in Forum Italicum, Spring 2003. Pp 103-20.

43. “Luigi Pirandello” in Dictionary of Literary Biography, Italian Novelists, 1900-1945, Bruccoli Clark

Layman, Inc. 2002. Pp. 251-71.

42. “La voce del mare: da Oceano mare di Baricco a La leggenda del pianista sull’oceano di Tornatore,”

Italica. (Spring 2002) Pp. 59-76. http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.lib.utexas.edu/stable/3655971

41. “Cavalleria rusticana from Verga and Mascagni to Zeffirelli,” in Forum Italicum, 33,1 (1999), pp. 95-106.

40. “Pirandello, Michelstaedter e l’ Espressionismo” in E. Lauretta ed. Pirandello e le Avanguardie,

Agrigento: Edizioni Centro Nazionale Studi Pirandelliani, 1999. Pp. 173-182.

39. “Woman as One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand in Pirandello,” in G.P. Biasin and M. Gieri

eds.New Perspectives on Pirandello, University of Toronto Press 1999. Pp. 163-188.

38. “«Il tramonto della luna»: Leopardi’s Last Song,” in Rivista di Studi Italiani (Univ. of Toronto), XVI, 2,

December 1998, pp.41-57.

-

37. “Carlo Michelstaedter tra parola e immagine” in M. Ciccuto, A. Zingone eds. I segni incrociati.

Letteratura italiana del ‘900 e arte figurativa (Lucca: Mauro Baroni, 1998). Pp. 165-179.

36. “«Candelora» e «Sgombero»: Dal silenzio alla parola, dalla narrativa al teatro, dalla gabbia al volo” in

Pirandello e la narrativa siciliana ed. E. Lauretta. Palermo: Palumbo, 1998.Pp. 141-48.

35. “Epistolario e Teatro: scrittura dell’assenza e sublimazione dell’erotismo,” in La Scrittura e l’assenza:

le lettere di Pirandello a Marta Abba in Il castello di Elsinore (quadrimestrale di teatro), year xi, 33,

1998, pp.32- 46.

34. “Woman as Creator: Pirandello’s L’innesto,” in Pirandello Studies (University College, London),17,

1997, pp. 34-45.

33. “L’attrice, ovvero il paradosso dell’esistenza autentica” in E. Lauretta, ed. Pirandello e il Teatro, Palermo:

Palumbo (1997), pp.153-160.

32. “Giacomo Leopardi’s ‘Ultrafilosofia’.” Italica (Spring 1997), pp.52-66.

31. “The Destabilizing Force of Female Language in Pirandello’s Theater”, in Rena A. Siska-Lamparska, ed.

Ars dramatica. Studi sulla poetica di Luigi Pirandello. New York: Peter Lang, 1996, pp.159-174.

30. “Il pensiero femminile italiano negli Stati Uniti.” Il Contributo (1996), pp.77-90.

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29. “Pirandello, Nietzsche and the Good Mask.” Pirandello in Germany, Pirandello Society of America, 11

(1995), pp. 5-16.

28. “Il carteggio Luigi Pirandello-Marta Abba” Review Article, Italica, 72,3 (1995), pp. 356-366.

27. “Pirandello nell’opera lirica al di là dell’Atlantico,” in E. Lauretta, ed. Pirandello: Teatro e Musica.

Palermo: Palumbo, 1995, pp.213-224.

26. “La lingua del femminile in Pirandello” in Pirandello e la Lingua, edited by E. Lauretta. Milan: Mursia,

1994, pp.133-142.

25. “Enrico IV tra Pirandello e Bellocchio.” Quaderni d’italianistica, 14, 2 (1993), pp.1-11.

24. “Mia musa, mia sposa.” in Pirandello e il Teatro, edited by E. Lauretta. Milan: Mursia, 1993, pp.203-220.

23. “L’ultimo teatro di Pirandello come sublimazione dell’erotismo.” Italica (Spring,1993), pp. 46-59.

22. “Procreation Versus Artistic Creation in Pirandello.” Selected Proceedings of the Pennsylvania Foreign

Language Conference, vols. 1988-1990. Duquesne University: Pittsburgh, 1993, pp. 46-53.

21. Special Contribution: Introductory Essay “The Authenticity of Drawing” (in English & Italian) for

Catalogue “L’Immagine irraggiungibile. Dipinti e disegni di Carlo Michelstaedter, Gorizia: Edizioni

della Laguna, 1992, pp. 15-64.

20. “La storia come maschera” in Pirandello e la politica, ed.E. Lauretta. Milan: Mursia, 1992, pp. 199-207.

19. “La creazione estetica come sconfitta della morte” in Pirandello e l’ Oltre, ed. E. Lauretta. Milan:

Mursia, 1991, pp. 233-243.

18. “Pirandello’s Philosophy and Philosophers” in A Companion to Pirandello’s Studies, ed. by J.-L.,

DiGaetani, New York: Greenwood Press, May 1991, pp. 17-46.

17. “Michelstaedter, Pirandello and Folly” in Italian Culture VIII, 1990, pp. 363-376.

16. Il pozzo e il pendolo. The Precarious Balance Between Life and Thought” in Romance Languages Annual

Purdue: Research Foundation, West Lafayette, 1990, pp. 87-93.

15. “Carlo Michelstaedter: The Tragedy of Thought” in Differentia. Review of Italian Thought, 2, (Spring

1988), pp. 185-94.

14. “Il Leopardi di Toni Negri” (Review Article) in Annali d’Italianistica, 6, 1988, pp. 329-335.

13. “Fu Leopardi ‘umorista’?” in Italian Quarterly, (Summer-Fall 1987), pp. 59-64.

12. “Leopardi e Michelstaedter tra autenticità e inautenticità” in Italiana ( December 1986), pp. 219-227.

11. “Carlo Michelstaedter tra ‘Persuasione’ e ‘Rettorica’, in Italica (Winter, 1986), pp. 346-360.

10. “...Ma quale ‘commedia è finita’? A Pirandellian Reading of Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci”, in Canadian

Journal of Italian Studies, vo. 8 (1985), no. 31, pp. 173-184.

9. “Angelo di bontà e la trasformazione del romanzo storico in Italia” Italian Quarterly, (June,1983), pp. 5-15.

8. “Giacomo Leopardi and French Materialism” in Comparative Literature Studies (June, 1983), pp. 154-167.

7. “Kairos and Chronos in Svevo’s Confession of Zeno” in Canadian Journal of Italian Studies, Vol. 3, No. 2

(1980), pp. 102-107.

6. “Senilità e salute, ragione e istinto, scrittura e vita in un ‘buon vecchio’ e in una ‘bella fanciulla’“ in Forum

Italicum, vol. 12, no. 3 (1978), pp. 351-368.

5. “Il problema dei Messicani minoranza silenziosa” in Concretezza ( Rizzoli), XVII, No. 5 (March 1, 1971),

pp. 22-26.

4. “In piena rivoluzione le donne americane” in Concretezza (Rizzoli), XVI, No. 22 (November 16, 1970), pp.

23-37.

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3. “La questione cambogiana: il ‘profondo sud non ha dubbi” in Concretezza (Rizzoli), XVI, No. 14 (July 16,

1970), pp. 28-30.

2. “La TV americana vi toglie il respiro” in Concretezza (Rizzoli), XVI, No. 8 (June 16, 1970), pp. 23-24.

1. “Abbandono degli studi dopo le elementari in una borgata romana” in Scuola e Città, XVIII(August, 1965),

pp. 523-526, with Grazia Lacovara, Paolo Carpignagno and Mario Sabatini.

ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES:

“Pirandello’s Humor” in SAGE Encyclopedia of Humor Studies, editor Salvatore Accardo (forthcoming).

REVIEWS:

-Dominique Budor. Mattia Pascal tra parola e imagine. Dal romanzo di Pirandello a Dylan Dog. Inversità

degli Studi Torino: Carocci Editore, 2004. PSA. The Journal of the Pirandello Society of America. 17,

2004, pp. 139-142.

-Thomas Harrison. 1910: The Emancipation of Dissonance. Berkeley University Press, 1996. Italica, (Winter

1999), pp.544-547

-Maggie Gunsberg. Patriarchal Representations. Gender and Discourse in Pirandello’s Theater.

Oxford/Providence: Berg Publisher, 1994. Italica (Spring 1997), pp.108-111.

-Pirandello’s Major Plays. English Version by Eric Bentley. Evanston: Northwestern University Press,

1991.Italica. (Summer ‘93), pp. 207-209.

Contribution to Romantic Movement (1981-1987):

-Seventeen reviews on books and articles on Leopardi and Manzoni for Romantic Movement. Locust Hill Press,

1987, pp. 421-428; 430.

-Twenty-one reviews on books and articles on Leopardi for Romantic Movement (New York: Garland

Publishing Co.), 1986, pp. 492-500.

-Giovanna Wedel Anderson. La Poesia neobarocca di Bartolo Cattafi (Sciascia, 1985) in Italica (Winter

1986), pp. 396-398.

-Sixteen reviews on books and articles on Leopardi for Romantic Movement (New York: Garland Publishing

Co.), 1985, pp. 423-427.

-Valentino Belfiglio. The Italian Experience in Texas (Austin: Eaking Press, 1983) in The Texas Humanist, vol.

6, n. 3, Jan.-Feb. 1984.

-Sixteen reviews on books and articles on Leopardi for Romantic Movement (New York: Garland Publishing

Co.), 1984, pp. 360-372.

-Eighteen reviews on books and articles on Leopardi for Romantic Movement (New York: Garland Publishing

Co.), 1983, pp. 360-372.

-Fifteen reviews of books and articles on Leopardi for Romantic Movement (New York: Garland Publishing

Co.), 1982, pp. 353-363.

-Charles C. Russell. Italo Svevo. The Writer from Trieste. Reflections on His Background and His Work in

Forum Italicum, Vo. 14, No. 1 (Spring 1980), pp. 121-123.

-Fifteen reviews of books and articles on Leopardi for Romantic Movement (New York: garland Publishing

Co.), 1981, pp. 350-361.

Translation of the essay by Mario Perniola “Beyond postmodernism: ‘Michelstaedter, Strong Feeling, The

Present’“ in Differentia: Review of Italian Thought 3-4, 1989, pp. 39-49.

INVITED PAPERS / LECTURES / SEMINARS

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“Pier Paolo Pasolini and Marco Tullio Giordana: A Dialogue Through Poetry” keynote address at the XXI

international conference of the Associazione Internazionale di Studi di Lingua e Letteratura Italiane at

University of Pennsylvania, April 5, 2013.

“Carlo Michelstaedter and Today’s Abuse of Rhetoric” at The University of Pennsylvania, April 12, 2012.

Mini-seminar on “The Representation of Woman in Sicilian Culture,” Yale University, April 2-4, 2012

“Verdi, Woman and Nation” Connie De Marco Lecture at Florida Atlantic University, February 2, 2011;

keynote lecture at the symposium “Una d’arme di lingua, d’altare? Italy @150” at Georgetown University,

October 14 ; and keynote lecture at the symposium “Italy Then and Now: 150th Anniversary” at Duquesne

University, Pittsburgh, October 17, 2011.

“ Pulcinella: un pensiero meridiano” keynote address at the XX international conference of the Associazione

Internazionale di Studi di Lingua e Letteratura Italiane at University of Pennsylvania, December 4, 2009.

“The Legacy of Fellini’s vitelloni in Italian cinema” at the Western Pennsylvania Symposium of World

Literatures, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, April 16, 2009.

“An Antihero in the Sicily of the Risorgimento” at UCLA “Symposium on The Leopard: 1958-2008,” October

31, 2008.

I Vitelloni Yesterday and Today,” at Middlebury College, October 21, 2008.

“Carlo Michelstaedter Today: The Burden of Truth and the Proliferation of Rhetoric” at the International Nexus

Conference, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, June 14th 2008.

“The Legacy of Pirandello’s Humor in Italian Film Comedy,” keynote address at the Conference on Italian Film

Comedy at Yale University, April 26, 2008.

“Leopardi and Music” at the Symposium in honor of Giuseppe Mazzotta “Tra amici,” The University of Mary

Washington, March 29th, 2008.

“I vitelloni: Yesterday and Today” at Texas Tech, November 12, 2007, given also with the title:

“Fellini, Muccino, and the Vitelloni: Italy of Yesterday, Italy of Today” at Texas A&M, March 7th, 2007.

“Cultural Intersections in Pasolini” at the Coccia Conference, University of Pennsylvania, December 2, 2006.

“Intersezioni e geografie culturali: Pasolini tra cinema e sceneggiata, tragedia classica e teatro dei pupi,

Modugno e Pirandello.” Keynote address at the Associazione Internazionale di Studi di Lingua e Letteratura

Italiane, University of Padua, Italy, September 23, 2006.

Introduction to Fellini’s film I vitelloni at Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, September 2006.

“Perché Le due vite del fu Mattia Pascal?: Una domanda a Mario Monicelli” at the International Pirandello

Conference. Agrigento, December 7, 2005.

“Mysterious Women in Pirandello’s Drama” at Dartmouth College, August 9, 2005.

“Marco Tutino’s La Lupa: A Post-modern, Neo-romantic Opera” guest speaker at the Conference on

Plurilinguism at the university of Toronto, April 29-30, 2005.

“Reticence: A Rhetorical Strategy in Othello/Otello: Shakespeare, Verdi-Boito, Zeffirelli” Crisafulli Lecture at

the the Catholic Univerity of America, Washington, DC, April 13th, 2005.

9

“Da Tuda a Ilse: Marta, ovvero la rinuncia dell’eros,”at the International Pirandello Conference, Agrigento,

December 7, 2004.

“Monicelli e Mattia Pascal,” at the Casa Italiana, NYU, November 2004.

“Pirandello, i Taviani e la musica” at the International Pirandello Conference” in Agrigento, Sicily, December

6, 2003.

“Art Versus Life in Three Plays by Ibsen, D’Annunzio and Pirandello,” at the 10th International Ibsen

Conference, Long Island University, Brooklyn, N.Y. June 2003.

“Women of Italian South” at The University of Wisconsin, Madison, April 22, 2002; and at the University of

California at Berkeley, February 28, 2002.

“My Muse, My Bride: Pirandello’s Plays for Marta Abba” at the University of Notre Dame, February 2001.

“Othello: from Shakespeare to Verdi to Zeffirelli” keynote lecture at The Western Pennsylvania Symposium of

World Literatures: Shakespeare and Verdi: Literature in Performance; April 17, 2000.

“Pirandello, Michelstaedter e l’Espressionismo” at the International Conference on Pirandello e le

Avanguardie” in Agrigento, Italy, December 1998.

“La voce della luna” at The Rutgers University Italian Literature Conference on “Leopardi and Modern

Aesthetics”, October 17th, 1998.

- “«Candelora» e «Sgombero»: dal silenzio alla parola; dalla narrativa al teatro” at the International

Conference on Pirandello e la Narrativa Siciliana, in Agrigento, Italy, December 1997.

- “Epistolario e Teatro: scrittura dell’assenza e sublimazione dell’erotismo” University of Turin (Italy), May 7,

1997.

- “L’attrice, ovvero il paradosso dell’esistenza autentica” at the International Conference on Pirandello and His

Work, in Agrigento, Italy, December 1996.

- “Pirandello nell’opera lirica al di là dell’Atlantico” at the International Conference on Pirandello in Agrigento,

Italy, December 1994.

- “The Destabilizing Force of Female Language in Pirandello’s Theatre” at the International Symposium on

Pirandello’s Theatre, at Boston College, October 1994.

- “La donna nel teatro di Pirandello” at the Academy of Fine Arts, Rome, Italy, December ‘93.

- “Il linguaggio del femminile in Pirandello” at the International Conference on Pirandello, Agrigento, Italy,

December 1993. (This paper is the developement of the one given in Pittsburgh in September and in Austin

in October. See following category).

- Introductory Lecture for the opening of the Exhibition L’immagine irraggiungibile. Dipinti e disegni di Carlo

Michelstaedter, May 8, 1992, in the Castle of Gorizia, Italy.

- Presentation of my book, Carlo Michelstaedter and the Failure of Language, sponsored by the City of Gorizia

at the Antonini Bookshop in Gorizia, May 1992.

- “Mia musa, mia sposa” at the International Conference on Pirandello, Agrigento, Italy, December 1992.

- “La storia come maschera” at the International Conference on Pirandello, Agrigento, Italy, December 1991.

Also presented at the American Association of Italian Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel

Hill, April, 1992.

- “La creazione artistica come sconfitta della morte” at the International Conference on Pirandello, Agrigento,

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December 1990.

PAPERS AT CONFERENCES:

“<Cesare a’ da murì> or Cesare deve morire in Neapolitan Dialect at the fourth Symposium on Italian Cinema,

at Indiana University, April 18, 2013.

“ Women Triumphant: Marco Bellocchio’s Sorelle Mai at the annual American Association for Italian Studies,

College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, May 2012.

“Pulcinella, un pensiero meridiano” at Echioltremare Conference” Rome, June 17, 2011.

“Verdi, Woman, and Nation” at the University of Texas, Austin, April 20, 2011.

“Operatic Appearances in the Cinema of Marco Bellocchio” at the annual American Association for Italian

Studies” at the University of Pittsburgh, April 2011, and at the Symposium on Italian Modern and

Contemporary Cinema, Indiana University, Bloomington, April 2011.

“Pulcinella in Paris” at the Modern Language Association annual conference in Los Angeles, January 2011;

already given as:

“Pulcinella dans les Banlieues” at the Symposium on Italian Modern and Contemporary Cinema, at Indiana

University, Bloomington, April 2010.

“Leonardo Sciascia’s Aciascuno il suo: The Failure of the Intellectual” at the annual conference of the

American Association for Italian Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, April 2010.

“Pirandello’s On Humor and Italian Film Comedy” at the Modern Language Association annual conference in

San Francisco, Dec.27, 2008.

“Cinquant’anni di vitellonismo” at the annual conference of the American Association for Italian Studies at

Colorado College, Colorado Springs, May 2007.

“Il Pirandello nascosto in Che cosa sono le nuvole di Pier Paolo Pasolini” at the annual conference of the

American Association for Italian Studies and the American Association of Teachers of Italian, Genoa, May

2006.

“The Status of Italian Graduate Studies in the US,” at the annual conference of the American Association for

Italian Studies and the American Association of Teachers of Italian in Genoa, May 2006.

“ Teaching the Ottocento Through Opera” at the MLA in Washington, December 28th, 2005.

“The Hidden Authorship in Pier Paolo Pasolini’s “Che cosa sono le nuvole” at the Authorship Conference, at

the University of Texas, Austin, October 2005.

“The Impotent Italian Intellectual” at The American Association for Italian Studies, at the University of North

Carolina, Chapel Hill, April 2005.

“Reticence in Othello/Otello: Shakespeare, Verid-Boito, Zeffirelli” at the American Association for Italian

Studies, University of Ottawa, April 2004.

“Pirandello, i Taviani e la musica” at the American Association for Italian Studies Conference, Georgetown

University, Washington, DC, March 2003.

“Verdi, Women and War” at the Modern Language Association Conference in New York, December 2002.

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“Witches of the South: Giovanni Verga’s Gna’ Pina, and Carlo levi’s Giulia Venere” at the South Central

Modern Language Association in Austin, November 2002.

“Sicily as a Woman” at the American Association for Italian Studies Conference, University of Missouri-

Columbia, April 2002.

“Pirandello’s De-sexualization of Woman: The Theater for Marta Abba” at the Modern Language Association

Conference in New Orleans, December 2001.

“La voce del mare: da Oceano Mare a La leggenda del pianista sull’oceano at the annual meeting of the

American Association for Italian Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, April 2001.

“La donna in Giovanni Verga and Carlo Levi” at the annual meeting of the American Association for Italian

Studies in New York, April 15, 2000.

Cavalleria rusticana: from Verga to Mascagni and Zeffirelli” at the Romance Language Conference, Purdue

University, October 1998, at the Modern Language Association in San Francisco, December 1998, and at

the American Association for Italian Studies, Eugene, Oregon, April 1999.

“Giacomo Leopardi’s “Il tramonto della luna” at the annual meeting of the American Association for Italian

Studies” at Loyola University, Chicago, April, 1998.

“The Un-clamping of the Vise: Pirandello’s Play The Grafting”at the annual meeting of the American

Association for Italian Studies at Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C. February 1997.

“Narrative versus Dramatic Discourse in Pirandello” at the Modern Language Association Conference,

Washington, D.C., December 1996.

“My Muse, My Bride. Pirandello’s Theater for Marta Abba” at the annual meeting of the American

Association for Italian Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, April 1996.

“Woman as One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand: The Actress in Pirandello” at the annual Modern

Language Conference in Chicago, December 1995.

“Pirandello e l’opera” at the American Association for Italian Studies University of Arizona, Tempe, April

1995.

“Pirandello, Nietzsche and the Good Mask” at the Modern Language Association Convention in San Diego,

December 1994.

“Leopardi’s Ultrafilosofia” at the International Association of Philosophy and Literature Convention at the

University of Alberta, in Edmonton, May 1994 and at the Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference,

Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, September 1994.

“Italian Philosophical Feminism: The Unheeded Voice” at the American Association for Italian Studies at the

University of Wisconsin at Madison, April 1994.

“La lingua femminile in Luigi Pirandello” at the Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference, Duquesne

University, Pittsburgh, September 1993 and at the South Central Modern Language Association in Austin,

Texas, October 1993.

“Carlo Michelstaedter between Word and Image” at the Seventeenth Annual Meeting of the International

Association for Philosophy and Literature, Duquesne University, May, 1993.

“Henry IV between Flux and Stasis, Theater and Cinema,” at the South Central Modern Language Association,

Memphis, October, 1992.

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“La storia come maschera” at the American Association of Italian Studies at the University of North Carolina at

Chapel Hill, April, 1992.

“C. Michelstaedter: la parola e l’immagine” at the American Association of Italian Studies, University of

Michigan, Ann Arbor, April 1991.

“Pirandello’s Antifeminism” at the Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference at Duquesne University,

September, 1990.

“Copulation, Procreation and Artistic Creation in Pirandello” at the American Association for Italian Studies,

Charlottesville, VA, April, 1990 and at the Romance Language Conference at Purdue University, West

Lafayette, October 1990.

“Il pozzo e il pendolo. The precarious balance between Life and Thought at the Romance Language

Conference, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, October, 1989.

“Pirandello, Michelstaedter and Folly” at the American Association for Italian Studies, Lowell, Mass., April

1989.

“Il Leopardi di Toni Negri” at the American Association for Italian Studies, Provo, Utah, April, 1988.

“Carlo Michelstaedter: A Victim of ‘weak thought’?”, at the American Association for Italian Studies,

Pittsburgh, PA, April, 1987.

“Leopardi e Michelstaedter tra persuasione e retorica” at the American Association of Teachers of Italian, New

York, December, 1986.

“Carlo Michelstaedter tra ‘Persuasione’ e ‘Rettorica’“ at the American Association of Teachers of Italian, New

York, November, 1985.

“Fu Leopardi ‘umorista’?” at the American Association for Italian Studies in Tampa, Fla., April, 1985.

“Giacomo Leopardi and French Materialism,” South Central MLA, San Antonio, TX, October, 1982.

“Leo Spitzer and Leopardi’s Infinito.” South Central MLA, Hot Spring, Arkansas, Fall 1977.

“Kairos and Chronos in Svevo’s Confessions of Zeno. Conference on Twentieth-Century Literature at

Louisville, KY, Spring 1977.

CHAIRED/ORGANIZED SESSIONS:

Chair session of “Italian Cinema in the Present Tense” at the annual conference of the American Association for

Italian Studies, University of Pittsburgh, April 2011.

Organized and chaired two sessions of “Opera as Literature and Literature as Opera” at the Conference of the

American Association for Italian Studies and American Association of Teachers of Italian in Genoa, May

2006.

Organized and chaired the sessions “Literature and Music” and “The Italian Intellectuals and Politcis” at the

American Association for Italian Studies, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, April 2005.

Organized and Chaired to sessions on “Music and Literature” at the American Association for Italian Studies,

University of Ottawa, April 2004.

Organized and chaired the session “Images of the South” at the American Association for Italian Studies at

Georgetown University, March 2003.

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Organized and chaired the session “Real and Imaginary Cities” at the Modern Language Association conference

in New York (December 2002).

Organizer of the session “Benigni e la commedia all’italiana” and organizer and chair of session “Visions of the

Apocalypse” at the Modern Language Association in Washington (December 2000).

Organizer and Chair of a session on Italian Literature and Opera at the Modern Language Association in

Chicago (December 1999).

Chair and organizer of sessions “Text and Music: Italian Opera” and “Sicily through Literature, Cinema and

Music” at the American Association for Italian Studies at the University of Oregon (Eugene), April 1999.

Chair and organizer of the two sessions on “Pirandello and Translation,” sponsored by the Pirandello Society of

America, Modern Language Association, San Francisco, December 1998.

Chair and organizer of “Leopardi and the New Millennium” at the American Association for Italian Studies at

Loyola University, Chicago, April 1998 and at the Modern Language Association in Toronto, December

1997.

-Organizer and Chair of a session for the Pirandello Society of America at the MLA (December 95)

-Chair of the Italian Literature section of the SCMLA (1992)

-Secretary of the Italian Section of the South Central MLA (1991).

MEMBERSHIPS IN LEARNED SOCIETIES:

-Modern Language Association

-South Central Modern Language Association

-American Association of Teachers of Italian

-American Association for Italian Studies

- International Association of Philosophy and Literature

-Pirandello Society of America

-Associazione Internazionale di Lingua e Letteratura Italiane

ACADEMIC SERVICE:

-Chair of the Department of French and Italian (2003-2011)

-Executive Committee of Center for European Studies (2005-2007)

-Faculty Council (2002-2004)

-International Programs and Studies Committee (2002-2203)

-Committee for Promotion and Tenure (1998, 1999, 2000)

-Academic Advisor of the Gamma Kappa Alpha National Italian Honor Society (1996-1999)

Honors Advisor in Italian

-Italian Undergraduate Advisor, (1989-1994; 1996-2003)

-Member of the Graduate Studies Committee, Department of French & Italian

-Member of the Undergraduate Studies Committee, Department of French & Italian (1989-1994)

-Supervisor of all second-year Italian courses (1989-1993)

-Member, Committee on Awards and Prizes, Department of French & Italian

-Faculty Member, Comparative Literature Program

-Admission Committee, Comparative Literature

-Member of the Executive Committee (1991-94, 1996-2003).

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-UT Explore (2001, 2003, 2005).

Academic Service Outside UT:

- Member of the jury for the literary Premio Napoli (fall 2009; fall 2010)

-External Reviewer of the Romance Language Department and Graduate Program in Comparative Literature

at the University of Pennsylvania (January 2000); Modern Language Department, Duquesne University

Pittsburgh, October 2007, the French and Italian Department at Emory University (March 2008).

-Reviewer of book manuscript for the Duke University Press (summer 1999), book manuscript for Yale

University Press (spring 2002) and essay manuscript for Comparative Literature (fall 2003), book for

University of Toronto Press (2008).

-Reviewer of a grant proposal for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (three

times); and for Barnard College (2011).

-Referee for promotion to the levels of associate professor and professor for: Nazareth College of

Rochester(1998), Dickinson College, (PA) (1999), Princeton University (2001), University of Oregon

(2001), University of Notre Dame (2001), Georgetown University, Washington D.C. (2002), University

of California at Los Angeles (2002), Indiana University (2003), Notre Dame University, Catholic

University of America, St. Johns University (2005), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2006);

Purdue University (2007), Bard College (2207), Mount Holyoke College (2008), Bucknell University

(2009), Texas A&M (2009), Dickinson College (2010), Wayne State University (2011), Ohio State

University (2013), Louisiana State University (2013).

-Evaluator of essays for Italica, Forum Italicum (latest 2012), Quaderni d’Italialianistica (latest 2012)

Pirandello Society of America.

-Participated to the National Italian American Foundation Conference in Washington D.C. October 2002.

Received a NIAF $5,000 scholarship for one of our students.

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