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David Birdsong, Chair 201 W 21ST STREET STOP B7600, HRH 2.114A, AUSTIN, TX 78712 • 512-471-5531

Cinzia Russi

Associate Professor PhD Linguistics 2003, University of Washington

Cinzia Russi

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-7024
  • Office: HRH 3.110B
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014 T-Th 2-3:30 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Interests

Historical linguistics, Grammaticalization, Aspectualizers, Morphosyntax, Morphology, Italian Dialects, Comparative Romance Linguistics, Cognitive Grammar, Pragmatics, Lexical Semantics

FR 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

37045 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as ITL 396K, LIN 383, POR 396K, SPN 396K )
show description

See syllabus

ITL 330K • Change/Var Contemp Italian

37220 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am HRH 2.112
show description

Please see Syllabus

ITL 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

37260 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as FR 396K, LIN 383, POR 396K, SPN 396K )
show description

See syllabus

FR 396K • Romance Morphosyntax

37220 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm HRH 2.106C
(also listed as LIN 383 )
show description

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37445 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BEN 1.108
show description

FR 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

36870 • Fall 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm HRH 2.106C
(also listed as LIN 383, POR 396K, SPN 396K )
show description

FR/ITL 396K – Introduction to Romance Linguistics

T 3:30-6:30 HRH 2.106C

 

Instructor:       Cinzia Russi

Office:             HRH 3.110B

Office hours:   T 10-11 and by appointment (please, feel free to contact me via email any time)

Email:              russi@mail.utexas.edu (preferred form of contact)

Phone:                        (512) 471 7024

 

I.       Course Objectives 

The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the Romance languages, both as a set of closely related linguistic systems that share a common ancestor and as a major historical and cultural phenomenon.

After a brief introduction and classification of the Romance languages currently spoken, we will continue with sketching their historical background, starting with an overview of their common ancestor, Latin. We will then move to the diachronic analysis of the major Romance languages.

Detailed linguistic analysis of (extracts of) texts from different historical periods will serve as a tool to assess our learning, and will give it an empirical, concrete dimension.

By the end of this course, students will have:

  1. Developed or strengthened the analytical skills necessary for reading scholarly articles; have become familiar with the most important scholars in the field.
  2. Mastered how to write abstracts for conference presentations and articles and how to deliver a paper to a peer audience.
  3. Improved the skill required to conduct research and write scholarly articles

 

II.      Format and Procedures

The course will include lecture sessions and in-class discussion sessions.

  1. In the lecture sessions, I will present linguistic structures and data, which will be summarized in handouts. It will be the students’ responsibility to go over the material presented in class and, whenever needed, integrate it through further independent reading.
  2. During the in-class discussion sessions I expect active participation, in the form of giving concrete and lively input to the discussion, from all the students. Therefore, the students a required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus .
  1. I assume that all the students are familiar with the fundamental notion of the main areas of linguistics (i.e., phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics). I also assume that students will seek my assistance whenever they deem necessary.

 

III.    Course Requirements

Graduate standing is required. Consent of Graduate Adviser must be obtained.

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37020 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 206
show description

Course Description

Objectives The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture.

We will reach these goals by:

a.   Reading short stories and passages from novels, and reviewing the grammatical structures they exhibit

b.   Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos/short movies

« The course is conducted exclusively in Italian.

Participation Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, and so on.

M This policy will be strictly enforced.

Students will be asked to come to class well prepared on the readings, to complete all the grammar exercises assigned, and to be ready to participate to class discussions.

Compositions Proper use of grammar as well as content will both greatly affect the composition grade. In order to get full credit, students must turn in compositions on the days indicated on the syllabus.

Oral presentations Students will give one oral presentations in class. This will be a group presentation. Each group will comprise three students and each presentation is expected to be 20-25 minutes long No reading allowed! You may use index cards if extremely necessary, but please, be prepared to act out your “role” as much as possible without reading.

You are free to choose the “genre” of your presentation: a satire, a comedy, a drama, an interview, a movie, etc. (if you choose to videotape your presentation, remember that you must have at least a “live” introduction in class). The subject must be based upon the material we have studied in the course; you can focus on one reading/author/film or two, or combine all of them together.

*** Evaluation criteria: pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, creativity, fluency of expression.

Texts Folder of Xerox-copied material

Dizionario Harper Collins Sansoni, standard edition (or equivalent dictionary)

Useful sites         Garzanti Linguistica http://www.garzantilinguistica.it

Eulogos http://www.eulogos.it

Grade policy The final grade will be computed as follows:

Class participation                  10%

Compositions                          20%

Quizzes                                  15%

Two exams                             20 % each

Oral performance                    15%

ITL 380L • Hist Of The Italian Language

37045 • Spring 2012
Meets W 100pm-400pm HRH 2.106C
show description

FR/ITL 396K – History of the Italian Language

(Unique 37045)

W 1:00–4:00pm HRH 2.106C

Instructor:                  Cinzia Russi, HRH 3.110B, russi@mail.utexas.edu

Office hours:              T & TH 9:00-10:30, and by appointment

Survey of the development of Italian from spoken Latin to the present day.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The objective of this course is to trace the development of the Italian language from its origins (spoken Latin) to the present day from a language internal perspective (i.e., reviewing and analyzing the main diachronic changes at the phonological, morphological, syntactic and lexical levels) as well as from a language external point of view (i.e., examining social, political and cultural changes). The most important linguistic changes that characterize the evolution of the language will be traced through the analysis of various texts from different stages. Special attention will be given to the linguistic diversity of Italy.

The course will be taught in Italian.

Grading policy:

  • Active class discussion (and critique) of reading assignments (15%)
  • Textual analyses (15%)
  • Research paper proposal with annotated bibliography (15%)
  • Presentation of term paper (15%)
  • Final research paper (40%)

Reading assignments

Students are required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus; even when they are not presenting, they are expected to come to class well prepared in order to be able to participate actively to the class discussion.

Term Paper

Students will write a 20/25-page research paper on an aspect of the history of Italian of their choice. The paper will be due on the day scheduled for the final examination. Students are essentially free in the choice of the topic; however, they are strongly encouraged to discuss the topic they choose with the instructor before they start their research.

Texts

  • Marazzini, Claudio. 2002. La lingua italiana. Profilo storico. Bologna: Il Mulino.
  • Patota, Giuseppe. 2007. Nuovi lineamenti di grammatica storica dell’italiano. Bologna: Il Mulino.

FR 396K • Grammaticalizatn In Rom Langs

36730 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 200pm-330pm HRH 2.106C
(also listed as ITL 396K, LIN 383, SPN 396K )
show description

FR/ITL 396K –Grammaticalization processes in Romance languages

M W 2:00-3:30pm HRH 2.106C

Instructor:    Cinzia Russi, HRH 3.110B, russi@mail.utexas.edu 

Office hours:            M & W 9:00-10:30, and by appointment

After an introductory discussion on grammaticalization (a general diachronic process of morphosyntactic change by which linguistic forms undergo a more or less substantial loss of syntactic independence accompanied by increase of their grammatical function), this course will examine specific grammaticalization processes pertaining to the following categories: (a) verbs, (b) demonstratives, (c) pronouns, (d) adverbs

We will then go on to discuss the nature of the relationship between grammaticalization and lexicalization. Next, we will examine how grammaticalization stands with respect to and is viewed within traditional (generative based) diachronic linguistics, focusing on two strictly interrelated issues, which have raised controversy mostly, although not exclusively, among grammaticalization ‘opponents’: (a) the unidirectionality of grammaticalization processes, (b) the reality/possibility of ‘degrammaticalization’

Grading policy:

  • Active class discussion (and critique) of reading assignments (15%)
  • Two oral presentations (30%)
  • Research paper proposal with annotated bibliography (15%)
  • Final research paper (40%) 

Reading assignments

Students are required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus; even when they are not presenting, they are expected to come to class well prepared in order to be able to participate actively to the class discussion.

Term Paper

Students will write a 20/25-page research paper on a grammaticalization process of their choice, or on theoretical aspects of grammaticalization that have particularly raised their interest. The paper will be due on the day scheduled for the final examination. Students are essentially free in the choice of the topic; however, they are strongly encouraged to discuss the topic they choose with the instructor before they start their research.

Texts

  • Readings packet. (Required)
  • Heine, Bernd, Ulrike Claudi and Friederike Hünnemeyer. 1991. Grammaticalization: A conceptual framework. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (On reserve)
  • Hopper, Paul, & Elizabeth C. Traugott. 2003. Grammaticalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (On reserve)

 

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

36955 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BEN 1.108
show description

ITL 328 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (Unique 36955)

Fall 2011

M, W & F 1:00-2:00

BEN 1.108

 

Instructor: Cinzia Russi

Office: HRH 3.110B

Phone: 471 6390

E-mail: russi@mail.utexas.edu

Office hours: M & W 10-12, and by appointment

Descrizione del corso

Objectives                The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture. We will reach these goals by:

  1. a.    Reading short stories and passages from novels, and reviewing the grammatical structures they exhibit
  2. b.    Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos/short movies

« The course is conducted exclusively in Italian.

Participation           Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, and so on.

M This policy will be strictly enforced.

Students will be asked to come to class well prepared on the readings, to complete all the grammar exercises assigned, and to be ready to participate to class discussions.

Compositions         Proper use of grammar as well as content will both greatly affect the composition grade. In order to get full credit, students must turn in compositions on the days indicated on the syllabus.

Oral presentations          Students will give one oral presentations in class. This will be a group presentation. Each group will comprise three students and each presentation is expected to be 20-25 minutes long No reading allowed! You may use index cards if extremely necessary, but please, be prepared to act out your “role” as much as possible without reading.

You are free to choose the “genre” of your presentation: a satire, a comedy, a drama, an interview, a movie, etc. (if you choose to videotape your presentation, remember that you must have at least a “live” introduction in class). The subject must be based upon the material we have studied in the course; you can focus on one reading/author/film or two, or combine all of them together.

*** Evaluation criteria: pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, creativity, fluency of expression.

Texts           Patota, Giuseppe. 2003. Grammatica di riferimento della lingua italiana per stranieri. Firenze: Le Monnier.

Folder of Xerox-copied material 

Useful sites            Garzanti Linguistica      http://www.garzantilinguistica.it

                          Eulogos http://www.eulogos.it

 

Grade policy                                    The final grade will be computed as follows:

Class participation             10%

Compositions                    20%                

Quizzes                            15%

Two exams                       20 % each

Oral performance               15%                            

Grading system       Starting in the Fall of 2009, the University will use a plus/minus system for grading. The following table illustrates the correspondences between letter grade, GPA points and percentage grade.

Letter Grade

GPA Points

Percentage Grade

A

4.0

93%-100%

A-

3.67

90%-92%

B+

3.33

87%-89%

B

3.0

83%-86%

B-

2.67

80%-82%

C+

2.33

77%-79%

C

2.0

73%-76%

C-

1.67

70%-72%

D+

1.33

67%-69%

D

1.0

63%-66%

D-

0.67

60%-62%

F

0

Less than 60

Class and University Policies

Religious holidays              By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Use of Blackboard                        In this class, I use Blackboard, a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu, to distribute some course materials. You can find support in using Blackboard at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

Academic Integrity

University of Texas Honor Code                   The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. Each student in this course is expected to abide by the University of Texas Honor Code.

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty                     Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

For further information, visit the Student Judicial Services web site http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs/. This site offers excellent resources on how to cite sources and paraphrase. Copying materials from other people or from sources on the Internet, for example, or having your work edited by somebody else, constitutes a fraudulent submission. Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student’s own work and will acknowledge others’ work as appropriate (e.g., citing sources).

Other University Notices and Policies

Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students   It is the student’s responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at

 http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html.

Documented Disability Statement                   The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. If you require special accommodations, you must obtain a letter that documents your disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to me at the beginning of the semester so we can discuss the accommodations you need. No later than five business days before an exam, you should remind me of any testing accommodations you will need. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)                   If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

Emergency Evacuation Policy              Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made. Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:

  • Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building.
  • Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.
  • If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week of class.
  • In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors.
  • Do not re-enter a building unless you are given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT-Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office.

Critical Dates          Please note the following critical dates for class administration:

  • August 29: Monday Last day of the official add/drop period; after this date, changes in registration require the approval of the department chair and usually the student’s dean. (See General Information, chapter 4, for details.)
  • Last day undergraduate students may register and pay tuition without the approval of the registrar.
  • Last day an undergraduate student may add a class except for rare and extenuating circumstances.
  • Payment for added classes (add bill) due by 5:00 pm.
  • Last day to drop a class for a possible refund. (See General Information, chapter 4, for details.)
  • Last day a student may change registration in a class to or from the pass/fail or credit/no credit basis.
  • September 9: Friday Twelfth class day; this is the date the official enrollment count is taken.
  • November 1: Tuesday Last day an undergraduate student may, with the dean’s approval, withdraw from the University or drop a class except for urgent and substantiated, nonacademic reasons.

 

ITL 396K • Grammaticalizatn In Rom Langs

37000 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 200pm-330pm HRH 2.106C
(also listed as FR 396K, LIN 383, SPN 396K )
show description

FR/ITL 396K –Grammaticalization processes in Romance languages

M W 2:00-3:30pm HRH 2.106C

Instructor:    Cinzia Russi, HRH 3.110B, russi@mail.utexas.edu 

Office hours:            M & W 9:00-10:30, and by appointment

After an introductory discussion on grammaticalization (a general diachronic process of morphosyntactic change by which linguistic forms undergo a more or less substantial loss of syntactic independence accompanied by increase of their grammatical function), this course will examine specific grammaticalization processes pertaining to the following categories: (a) verbs, (b) demonstratives, (c) pronouns, (d) adverbs

We will then go on to discuss the nature of the relationship between grammaticalization and lexicalization. Next, we will examine how grammaticalization stands with respect to and is viewed within traditional (generative based) diachronic linguistics, focusing on two strictly interrelated issues, which have raised controversy mostly, although not exclusively, among grammaticalization ‘opponents’: (a) the unidirectionality of grammaticalization processes, (b) the reality/possibility of ‘degrammaticalization’

Grading policy:

  • Active class discussion (and critique) of reading assignments (15%)
  • Two oral presentations (30%)
  • Research paper proposal with annotated bibliography (15%)
  • Final research paper (40%) 

Reading assignments

Students are required to complete the reading assignments as listed in the syllabus; even when they are not presenting, they are expected to come to class well prepared in order to be able to participate actively to the class discussion.

Term Paper

Students will write a 20/25-page research paper on a grammaticalization process of their choice, or on theoretical aspects of grammaticalization that have particularly raised their interest. The paper will be due on the day scheduled for the final examination. Students are essentially free in the choice of the topic; however, they are strongly encouraged to discuss the topic they choose with the instructor before they start their research.

Texts

  • Readings packet. (Required)
  • Heine, Bernd, Ulrike Claudi and Friederike Hünnemeyer. 1991. Grammaticalization: A conceptual framework. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (On reserve)
  • Hopper, Paul, & Elizabeth C. Traugott. 2003. Grammaticalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (On reserve)

 

FR 383M • Struc Of Fr: Syntax And Semant

36950 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 300pm-430pm BEN 1.106
show description

 

 Objectives of the course

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the linguistic analysis of modern French syntax and semantics. Particular emphasis will be given to acquiring the skills needed to conduct syntactic analysis. A second goal of the course is to become acquainted with the fundamental principles and methods of modern linguistic research.

Although no previous knowledge of linguistics is presumed, students are expected to have a basic knowledge of traditional grammatical terminology.

The course will be fast-paced and cover a vast amount of material, rather than deal with selected topics in detail. A large number of theoretical concepts and problems will be discussed in relatively short time. Therefore, regular attendance and class preparation are crucial.

Among the topics to be covered are: the notion of grammar; grammar and the lexicon; linguistic categories; verb system; tense and aspect; grammatical functions; valence; the pronominal system; phrase and sentence structure.

The course will be taught in English.

 

Computation of grade

Written homework assignments: 25%

Two midterms: 20% each

Final exam: 35%

 

Required course material

Reading packet

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37245 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BEN 1.106
show description

F C 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

36520 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.106
(also listed as ITL 396K, LIN 383 )
show description

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing in language and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser. 

Same as FR 396K, LIN 383, POR 396K, SPN 396K

Course Description:  The main objective of this course is to introduce the students to the Romance languages, both as a set of closely related linguistic systems that share a common ancestor and as a major historical and cultural phenomenon.

After a brief introduction and classification of the Romance languages currently spoken, we will continue with sketching their historical background, starting with an overview of their common ancestor, Latin. We will then move to the diachronic analysis of the major Romance languages.

Detailed linguistic analysis of (extracts of) texts from different historical periods will serve as a tool to assess our learning, and will give it an empirical, concrete dimension.

We will conclude with a brief general overview of ‘neo’-Romance languages.

Course packet (required)

Course Requirements

Graduate standing required. Consent of Graduate Adviser must be obtained.

 

Grading Policy

Assignments and class discussion 25%

Assignments 15%

Class discussion 10%

One written exam 25%

One preliminary paper 10%

Final paper and oral presentation 40%

Final paper 30%

Oral presentation 10%

 

ITL 330K • Change/Var In Contemp Italian

36770 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 304
show description

COURSE TITLE: The Italian of the third millennium: change and variation in contemporary Italian

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The objective of this course is to identify and examine some important evolutionary trends that are at work in present-day Italian (both spoken and written), focusing in particular on the consequence that these trends may have for the reduction/disappearance of the dichotomy between Standard language vs. non-standard varieties. The study of these novel developments will be conducted through a review of the relevant linguistic literature but also by way of direct analysis of raw empirical data.

The course will be divided into two main parts. The first part will start with an outline the essential features of italiano standard, italiano popolare (as well as the most vital sub/nonstandard varieties of the language) and a brief discussion of the current status of the dialects; then, we will examine the most significant changes and patterns of variation observed with respect to the areas of the language such as:

  • The pronominal system
  • The verb system:

§       status and vitality of the subjunctive mood

§       modal values of the future tense

  • The lexicon:

§       influence of English and other foreign languages (e.g., languages of immigration)

 

During the second part, we will look at how the innovative features identified in the first part of the course characterize some specific language varieties, namely:

  • The language of television and cinema
  • The language of newspapers
  • The language of the youth

 

Grading Policy

Written assignments and class discussion 40%

Assignments 25%

Class discussion 15%

Two written exams 30% each

 

Textbook: course packet (required)

ITL 396K • Intro To Romance Linguistics

36800 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.106
(also listed as F C 396K, LIN 383 )
show description

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing in language and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser. 

Same as FR 396K, LIN 383, POR 396K, SPN 396K

Course Description:  The main objective of this course is to introduce the students to the Romance languages, both as a set of closely related linguistic systems that share a common ancestor and as a major historical and cultural phenomenon.

After a brief introduction and classification of the Romance languages currently spoken, we will continue with sketching their historical background, starting with an overview of their common ancestor, Latin. We will then move to the diachronic analysis of the major Romance languages.

Detailed linguistic analysis of (extracts of) texts from different historical periods will serve as a tool to assess our learning, and will give it an empirical, concrete dimension.

We will conclude with a brief general overview of ‘neo’-Romance languages.

Course packet (required)

Course Requirements

Graduate standing required. Consent of Graduate Adviser must be obtained.

 

Grading Policy

Assignments and class discussion 25%

Assignments 15%

Class discussion 10%

One written exam 25%

One preliminary paper 10%

Final paper and oral presentation 40%

Final paper 30%

Oral presentation 10%

 

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37360 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WRW 113
show description
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