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David Birdsong, Chair 201 W 21ST STREET STOP B7600, HRH 2.114A, AUSTIN, TX 78712 • 512-471-5531

Guy P Raffa

Associate Professor Ph.D., Indiana University

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-5492
  • Office: HRH 3.104A
  • Office Hours: TBA
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Biography

Guy Raffa has taught at the University of Texas at Austin since 1991. He holds a B.S. in mathematics and computer science from Duke University and a Ph.D. in Italian Literature from Indiana University. His primary scholarly field is medieval Italian literature--Dante above all--with a secondary interest in modern Italian authors, particularly Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco. In addition to articles, book-essays, and reviews, he has published three books: Divine Dialectic: Dante's Incarnational Poetry (Toronto, 2000), Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Inferno" (Chicago, 2007), and The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Chicago, 2009). He won a gold award for innovative instructional technology with his Danteworlds Web site and has received a number of other awards and fellowships, including a President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award and a Raymond Dickson Centennial Endowed Teaching Fellowship. For work-in-progress on Dante's graveyard history, he won a Humanities Research Award from the University of Texas and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has been interviewed for articles in Investor's Business DailySlate, and The Atlantic, and has written for The Chronicle of Higher Education.

DanteWorlds    Inferno  Divine Dialectic 

 

Interests

Dante Studies, medieval Italian literature and culture, digital humanities, history and philosophy of science, Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco

ITL 390L • Crtv Chaos: Galileo To Calvino

37245 • Fall 2014
Meets W 1230pm-330pm HRH 2.106C
show description

Creative Chaos from Galileo to Calvino

Note: While the language of instruction is English, students are expected to read the primary Italian texts in the original language.

"One could sketch a history of civilizations," writes Italian critic Cesare Segre, "according to the various ways in which they represent order and chaos to themselves.” Italy itself has been a catalyst and cauldron for evolving theories and practices of chaos and order in literature, art, science, philosophy, and politics. This course examines selected works across time and disciplines—from Galileo's reflections on heavenly bodies to Primo Levi's responses to Nazi-Fascism and the Shoah—that attest to the imagining of chaotic and order-driven values and their relation to one another in Italian cultural production. Throughout the semester we will work inductively—at times abductively—to identify, develop, and refine models of chaos and order that arise from the works under consideration, to place these models into dialogue with contemporary theoretical ideas, and to assess their implications and significance.

The course is divided into two parts. In most of the semester, weeks 1-10, the class will work together on a sequence of five interrelated units: 1) "Classical and Medieval Catalysts" (weeks one and two) identifies paradigms of chaos and order in foundational texts by Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius, Cicero, Augustine, Boethius, and Bernardus Silvestris; 2) "Ordering Heaven and Hell" (week three) looks at how Dante and Galileo complicate the traditional privileging of order over chaos in their otherworldly visions; 3) we leap several centuries in "A Semiotics of Chaos and Order" (weeks four through six) but maintain (postmodern) contact with the Middle Ages through a close reading of Umberto Eco's Il nome della rosa; 4) Primo Levi's Il sistema periodico, on the other hand, combines scientific elements to create the "Ethics of Chaos and Order" that we discuss in weeks seven and eight; 5) Italo Calvino's Le città invisibili (weeks nine and ten) perhaps best embodies the "Dialectic of Chaos and Order" at the heart of this course, including the postmodern reconsideration of such traditionally chaotic notions as dissonance, imperfection, turbulence, and unpredictability.
Course texts for the final five weeks will be determined and provided by students based on the direction of their research for the final paper. Individual research may explore in greater depth material introduced in first part of the course or it may focus on other works, traditions, or disciplines that illuminate the imagining of chaos and order in Italian studies.

Required Texts: Umberto Eco, Il nome della rosa (Bompiani; I grandi tascabili; 2013); Primo Levi, Il sistema periodico (Einaudi tascabili; 2005); Italo Calvino, Le città invisibili (Mondadori; 1996). Selections (on Canvas) from Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius, Cicero, Augustine, Boethius, Bernardus Silvestris, Dante, and Galileo.

Critical and Theoretical Works (on Canvas) include selections from N. Katherine Hayles, Chaos Bound: Orderly Disorder in Contemporary Literature and Science; Penelope Reed Doob, The Idea of the Labyrinth from Classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages; Ilya Prigogine and Isabelle Stengers, Order out of Chaos; Edward Lorenz, The Essence of Chaos; Benoit Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature; and essays by Umberto Eco ("Abduction in Uqbar"), Michel Serres (“Lucretius: Science and Religion”), Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari ("Rhizome"), Rita Levi Montalcini (from Elogio dell'imperfezione), Victor Turner ("Passages, Margins, and Poverty: Religious Symbols of Communitas"), and Luisa Muraro and Adriana Cavarero (from Diotima: Il pensiero della differenza sessuale).

Assignments
Classwork and participation (including weekly Discussion Forum entries on Canvas): 20%
Short essay (3-5 pages) on a theoretical or critical text in dialogue with a primary work: 15%
Discussion leader for a lesson on texts for your research paper: 15%
Research paper of 15-20 pages with full documentation (the basis for a scholarly article): 50%

Course Objectives

1) Mastery of the course content through close analysis of a wide range of primary, critical, and theoretical works across temporal and disciplinary boundaries.

2) Systematic, targeted attention to research, writing, and oral communication skills to produce scholarly work fit for presentation at an academic conference and, with reasonable revision, for inclusion in a dissertation or for publication in a reputable scholarly venue.

3) To advance the reciprocity of scholarly and teaching excellence, we will explore pedagogical strategies to inform a potential undergraduate course on chaos and order with knowledge of the material studied and researched this semester.

ITC 349 • Dante

37360 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.118
(also listed as CTI 345, E 322, EUS 347 )
show description

Dante: Fall 2014

ITC 349 (37360) and E 322 (35700), cross-listed with EUS 347 and CTI 345

TTH 11-12:15 in MEZ 1.118

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

Office Hours: TTH 1:30-2:30 and by appointment in HRH 3.104A; phone: 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and carries the writing flag and the global cultures flag.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this material in discussion postings (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will revise and expand based on feedback, will assess your ability to engage scholarly research and support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poem with detailed textual analysis. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. You are expected to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class meetings.

Required Texts: Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum); Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds). Please note: you must use these translations.

Optional Text: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

5%: Five times during the semester you will post an entry to a discussion forum on Canvas. Entries may include answers to study questions, but other responses to Dante's poem are welcome as well. Each submitted entry must contain at least 200 of your own words. Entries, worth 1 point each, will receive full credit for successful, on-time completion.

15%: 1000-word essay on the Inferno

25%: Significant revision and expansion of this essay (based on teacher feedback) that incorporates material from Purgatorio and / or Paradiso and scholarly research. 1500-2000 words. 

5% Peer-editing (full credit for successful, on-time completion)

30%: Two short-answer examinations (15% each)

20%: Classwork and participation. You are expected to read the assigned material before class meetings and to participate—through attentive listening and informed contributions—in class activities and discussion.

Attendance Policy: Your attendance, which obviously influences your classwork and participation grade, is required at all class meetings. You are expected to arrive on time and to stay for the entire lesson. Repeated late arrivals to—or early departures from—will count as absences. For every class that you miss (for whatever reason) after the fourth absence, your final course grade (on a 100-point scale) will be reduced by 3 points up to a maximum of 15 points.

Late Work: There are no make-up exams—and other graded assignments will lose a full letter grade for each day they are late—except in the case of documented emergencies (e.g., illness, death in the family), religious holidays, or university-sponsored events (with prior notification).

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations, grades, and a discussion forum. You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas. For help with Canvas, consult the student tutorials (http://edutech.ctl.utexas.edu/students/) or contact support staff (https://utexas.instructure.com/courses/633028).

Writing Flag: Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline—in this case, literary criticism and humanities research. You will write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will have the opportunity to revise and expand an essay, and you will read and discuss your peers’ work. A substantial portion of your grade will therefore come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Global Cultures Flag: Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present—in this case Europe (Italy in particular) in the late Middle Ages as represented in Dante's Divine Comedy.

Grading: All assignments will be graded on a 100 point scale and converted to letter grades consistent with university policy:

A (94-100) = 4.0, A- (90-93) = 3.67, B+ (88-89) = 3.3, B (84-87) = 3.0, B- (80-83) = 2.67, C+ (78-79) = 2.3, C (74-77) = 2.0, C- (70-73) = 1.67, D+ (68-69) = 1.3, D (64-67) = 1.0, D- (60-63) = 0.67, F (below 60) = 0.0

Plagiarism, intentional or not, will result in an automatic F on the assignment as well as possible disciplinary action. For the definition of plagiarism and the University's policy on it, see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

Dante Web Sites

Danteworlds (the course Web site): http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu

Dante Today (Dante in contemporary culture): http://learn.bowdoin.edu/italian/dante

Dartmouth Dante Project (commentaries on the Commedia): http://dante.dartmouth.edu

World of Dante: http://www.worldofdante.org

Princeton Dante Project: http://etcweb.princeton.edu/dante/index.html

Digital Dante: http://dante.ilt.columbia.edu

 

ITL 390K • Dante II

37580 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BEN 1.106
show description

Spring 2014                                       Dante II

 

ITL 390K (37580), crosslisted with MDV 392M (41745): TTH 2-3:30 in BEN 1.106

Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian, HRH 3.104A; 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

 

Course Conducted in English; Reading Knowledge of Italian Required

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence focused on Dante’s Commedia and his other works. This semester we will read the second half of the Purgatorio (cantos 18-33), the Paradiso, books 2 and 4 of the Convivio, the De vulgari eloquentia, and the Eclogues. Placing our close reading of these texts within a series of literary, intellectual, and historical contexts, we will attend to Dante's engagement with works by classical authors (Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, Cicero) and other medieval poets, philosophers, and theologians. The Danteworlds commentary and the complementary Web site (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu) will provide much of this background material and help guide your reading of the Commedia. Since a goal of the course is to become familiar with major voices in Dante Studies, our discussion of Dante's works will be informed by selected works of criticism (available on Canvas).

Twice during the semester you are required to write a short response essay—both descriptive and analytical—to one of these critical works. For your final research paper (25-30 pages, with full documentation) you are encouraged to revise and expand your paper from Dante I. You are expected to attend class regularly, to be well prepared, and to participate actively in class discussion.

Required Texts: Purgatorio (Garzanti, 2008); Paradiso (Garzanti, 2006); Convivio (Garzanti, 2005); De vulgari eloquentia (Cambridge, 1996).

Optional: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009)

Assignments and Computation of Grade

Two 750-1000 word critical responses (10% each): 20%

Research project (paper and presentation): 50%

Class preparation and participation: 30%

 

 

ITL 390K • Dante I

37480 • Fall 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm BEN 1.108
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Dante I (Fall 2013)

ITL 390K, crosslisted with MDV 392M: T 330-630 in BEN 1.108

Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian, HRH 3.104A; 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

Course Conducted in English; Reading Knowledge of Italian Required

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence focused on Dante’s Commedia and his other works. This semester we will read the Inferno, the Vita nuova, two books of the Convivio (1 and 3), the Monarchia, and the first half of Purgatorio. Placing our close reading of these texts within a series of literary, intellectual, and historical contexts, we will attend to Dante's engagement with works by classical authors (Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, Cicero) and medieval poets, philosophers, and theologians. The Danteworlds commentary and the complementary Web site (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu) will provide much of this background material and help guide your reading of the Commedia

Since a goal of the course is to become familiar with major voices in Dante Studies, our discussion of Dante's works will be informed by selected works of criticism (available on Blackboard or in a course packet). Twice during the semester you are required to write a brief response—both descriptive and analytical—to one of these critical works. Other graded assignments include a take-home exam and a substantial research project consisting of a paper and a formal presentation to the class. For the paper, you are required to write a significant draft (15+ pages, with full documentation) that you will likely expand and revise in the spring semester. You are expected to attend class regularly, to be well prepared, and to participate actively in class discussion.

Required Texts: Inferno (Garzanti, 2008); Purgatorio (Garzanti, 2008); Vita nuova (Garzanti, 2009); Convivio (Garzanti, 2005); Monarchy (Cambridge, 1996)

 Optional: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009)

Assignments and Computation of Grade

Two 500-1000 word critical responses (10% each): 20%

Take-Home Exam: 20%

Research project (paper and presentation): 30%

Class preparation and participation: 30%

ITC 349 • Dante

37585 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 201
(also listed as E 322 )
show description

Dante: Fall 2013

ITC 349 (37585), Same as E 322 (35687)

TTH 12:30-1:45 in Parlin 201

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

Office Hours: TTH 1:45-3:15 in HRH 3.104A; phone: 232-5492

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in two exams. Take-home essays will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

Two in-class examinations (30% each): 60%

Two take-home essays (15% each): 30%

Class work (including journal entries and / or quizzes): 10%

Regular attendance is required: No student who misses more than 6 classes (3 weeks) for any reason can complete the course with a passing grade.

REQUIRED TEXTS: Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

OPTIONAL TEXT: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Grading and Plagiarism: All assignments will be graded on a 100 point scale and converted to letter grades consistent with university policy:

A (94-100) = 4.0, A- (90-93) = 3.67, B+ (88-89) = 3.3, B (84-87) = 3.0, B- (80-83) = 2.67, C+ (78-79) = 2.3, C (74-77) = 2.0, C- (70-73) = 1.67, D+ (68-69) = 1.3, D (64-67) = 1.0, D- (60-63) = 0.67, F (below 60) = 0.0

Plagiarism, intentional or not, will result in an automatic F on the assignment as well as possible disciplinary action. For the definition of plagiarism and the University's policy on it, see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

ITL 390K • Dante's Afterlives

37165 • Spring 2013
Meets W 1200pm-300pm MEZ 1.208
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Dante's Afterlives (Spring 2013)

Course Conducted in English; Reading Knowledge of Italian Required

     Summarizing Dante's popularity in Italy in the early twentieth century, one critic amusingly observed that the medieval poet "was cooked in every sauce, served hot and cold, grilled and in gelatin, whole and ground, alone or with sides, with critical mayonnaise and historical croutons: there was something for all tastes, for strong stomachs and for dyspeptic ones, for women and for men, for kindergartners and for doddering academics." In this course we will seek intellectual nourishment at the banquet of Dante's legacy by closely examining a broad range of responses to the poet—the man and his works—from Giovanni Boccaccio's biography in the late Middle Ages to Roberto Benigni's recent performances of TuttoDante. Between the Dante-inspired works of Boccaccio and Benigni, we will study various, often conflicting, versions of "Dante" in literature, art, film, politics, history, and popular culture. After establishing a foundation for Dante's influence by discussing his political treatise (Monarchia) and selected cantos of his Commedia (most from Inferno), we will embark on an interpretive journey tracing Dante's evolution from a regional to a national (then nationalist) figure before he attained the global status he enjoys today. Giuseppe Mazzini famously called Dante—Ugo Foscolo's "Ghibelline fugitive"—the "Prophet of the Italian Nation": we will accordingly examine appeals to Dante's authority in promoting the liberation and unification of Italy, but we will also consider his role as a beacon of liberty in the United States. Among other areas of inquiry, we will discuss Catholic interpretations of Dante as a neo-Guelph advocate of papal political power, nationalist appropriations of the poet for territorial expansion and military interventions, and recent representations of Dante as an icon of Italian culture on the world stage.

Touchstone texts in our tour of Dante's legacy across time, space, discipline, and culture will include: writings by Alfieri, Foscolo, Mazzini, Byron, Leopardi, Carducci, Cordelia Ray, Longfellow, D'Annunzio, Marinetti, T. S. Eliot, Samuel Beckett, Mussolini, Primo Levi, Matthew Pearl, Karen Russell, and others; artwork by Botticelli, Blake, Flaxman, Dorè, and Suloni Robertson; and films (and clips) by FrancescoBertolini(1911), Harry Lachman (1935), Spencer Williams (1944), Peter Greenaway and Raúl Ruiz (1989), Woody Allen (1997), Vincent Ward (1998), Sandow Birk (2008), and Michael Patrick King (2008).

Required Texts (at COOP): Dante, Inferno (Garzanti, 2008) and Monarchy (Cambridge, 1996)

Optional: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy (Chicago, 2009)

[Other sources and critical works will be posted on Blackboard or gathered in a packet.]

Assignments and Computation of Grade

Class preparation and participation: 25%

Three 500-1000 word critical response essays: 15%

Oral research presentation (the basis for a conference presentation): 10%

Term paper of 15-25 pages with full documentation (the basis for a scholarly article): 50%

ITL 326K • Intro Itl Lit: Mid Ages-18th C

37240 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm HRH 2.112
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Introduction to Italian Literature (Middle Ages - 18th Century): Spring 2011

 

ITL 326K: TTH 2-3:15 in HRH 2.112

Prof. Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

Office Hours: TTH 10-11 in HRH 3.104A; phone: 471-6390

E-mail: guyr@uts.cc.utexas.edu; Home Page: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr

 

In this course we will read and discuss selected works from the Middle Ages and early modern period. All reading, writing and discussion will be in Italian. Since love is a central, unifying theme of many course texts, we shall consider several of its nuances and representations: spiritual love; adult sexual and emotional intimacy; family relationships; friendships; group solidarity; and love of one's homeland. In addition to selections from Dante's Inferno and Boccaccio's Decameron, we will read and discuss works by Francesco d'Assisi, Angela da Foligno, Caterina da Siena, Giacomo da Lentini, Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Cecco Angiolieri, Compiuta Donzella, Francesco Petrarca, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Vittoria Colonna, Niccolò Machiavelli, Gaspara Stampa, Galileo and Virginia Galilei. We will strategically use materials from contemporary Italian culture—including popular music (Ferro, Nek, Giorgia, Alexia, Jovanotti) and Pasolini’s film adaptation of the Decameron—to put these works of early Italian literature into dialogue with more recent representations and issues.

 

Grading Policy

Two exams: 50%

Two essays: 25%

Preparation and participation (including quizzes): 25%

Regular attendance is required: No student who misses more than 6 classes (3 weeks) for any reason can complete the course with a passing grade.

Required Texts

Dante Alighieri, Inferno (Garzanti, 2008)

Francesco Petrarca, Poesie (Bonacci, 1996)

Course packet (I.T. Copy, 512 W. MLK Blvd; phone: 476-6662)

 

ITL 390L • Umberto Eco And Italo Calvino

36795 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 0.120
show description

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing is required.

Calvino and Eco:  Fiction, Theory, and Criticism

The responses of Umberto Eco and Italo Calvino to the interrelations of author, reader, and text, and the future of literature and literary studies show that in a cultural moment favorable toward multi-disciplinarity at least two general directions coexist: an encounter with multiple discourses of knowledge in order to mark more clearly their boundaries, and a belief that new epistemological configurations arise from the interplay--and even contamination--of different lines of inquiry.  We shall explore the important contribution of these two Italian writers to contemporary literary and intellectual debate by examining selected creative, critical, and theoretical texts.  Not satisfied only to show how their theory and fiction "reflect" one another, we shall also attend to the ideological assumptions and implications of Eco’s and Calvino’s works.  

In addition to the texts in the bookstores, there will be a number of works on reserve in the PCL, including secondary sources essential for your research paper of substantial proportions (15-25 pp. with full documentation).  This paper will account for 60% of your grade, with the remaining 40% evenly divided between class participation and two short response essays (2-4 pp.).  Although class discussion will be in English, texts will be available in both Italian and English.      

 

Required Texts

Calvino: Lezioni americane (Mondadori, ISBN = 9788804485995), Tutte le cosmicomiche (Mondadori,  ISBN = 9788804520467), Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore (Mondadori, ISBN =  9788804482000), Visconte dimezzato (Mondadori, ISBN = 9788804370871)

Eco: Nome della rosa (Bompiani, ISBN = 9788845246340), Isola del giorno prima (Bompiani, ISBN = 9788845246449), Interpretation and Overinterpretation (Cambridge, ISBN = 9780521425544), Six Walks in the Fictional Woods (Harvard, ISBN = 9780674810518)

On Reserve / Blackboard: selections from Uses of Literature, Limits of Interpretation, Role of the Reader, Semiotics and the Philosophy of Language

 

ITC 349 • Dante

36900 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 203
(also listed as E 322, EUS 347 )
show description

Instructor: Raffa

ITL 326K • Intro Itl Lit: Mid Ages-18th C

37040 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 2.122
(also listed as EUS 347 )
show description

ITL 326K (attached)

ITL 390K • Dante II

37080 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ 2.122
(also listed as MDV 392M )
show description

ITL 390K (attached)

Digital Humanities

Danteworlds Web Site

Welcome to Danteworlds

A multimedia journey--combining textual commentary, artistic images, and audio recordings--through the three realms (Inferno, Purgatory, Paradise) of Dante's Divine Comedy. This site contains, in addition to an abridged version of the original commentary in The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy and Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Inferno, Italian recordings of selected verses and a vast gallery of images depicting characters and scenes from the Divine Comedy. Like the books, the Danteworlds Web site is structured around a geographic representation of Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise--the three worlds of Dante's Divine Comedy.

Danteworlds is "an invaluable resource for specialists and novices alike," writes E. S. Hierl (Harvard University) in Choice Reviews Online, "the sort of multimedia experience that those in the digital humanities strive for" (August, 2010). The subject of an interview on the home page of the University of Texas at Austin, Danteworlds was selected for inclusion on EDSITEment in 2008 as "one of the best online resources for education in the humanities," and was featured in the literary blogs of the New Yorker (Jan. 8, 2009) and the Los Angeles Times (Jan. 14, 2009).

Publications

"Calvino's Scientific Humanism," in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Italo Calvino, ed. Franco Ricci. New York: MLA, 2013. 37-41.

"A Beautiful Friendship: Dante and Vergil in the Commedia." MLN 127.1 (Supplement) (2012): 72-80.

"Eco's Scientific Imagination," in New Essays on Umberto Eco, ed. Peter Bondanella. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. 34-49.

The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy." Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Inferno." Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

"'Io amo New York': Calvino's Creatively Chaotic City," in Science and Literature in Italian Culture from Dante to Calvino, ed. Pierpaolo Antonello and Simon A. Gilson. Oxford: Legenda, 2004. 276-91.

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