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David Birdsong, Chair 201 W 21ST STREET STOP B7600, HRH 2.114A, AUSTIN, TX 78712 • 512-471-5531

Karen A Pagani

Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Chicago

Karen A Pagani

Contact

Biography

Karen Pagani began working at The University of Texas in 2008.  She received both her M.A. and Ph.D from the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago. She recently finished a manuscript entitled, "Forgiving Men and Citizens: Anger, Forgiveness, and Authenticity in Rousseau" (forthcoming Penn State Press, April 2015)

Her current book project, "Accounting for Forgiveness in the Age of Reason: Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, and Butler" explores what was a discursive crisis in understanding the concept of forgiveness in purely secular terms during the late seventeenth, eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.  Discursive crisis denotes in this context a peculiar situation in which a concept proved to be incompatible with a specific communicative system’s historicallydeterminedvocabulary but could not be abandoned for both ideological and practical reasons. Through an historical analysis of the aforementioned thinkers, this project will provide a nuanced understanding as to why forgiveness was so difficult to speak about during this period and, in the conclusion, how these difficulties may still influence our understanding of the concept today.  Much of the impetus behind this study stems from the observation that there is a historicity to the concept forgiveness. The project thus poses a challenge to more contemporary accounts of forgiveness that advocate a transcendent, universalizing notion of the concept. One of the questions implicit within this historical study, and to which the conclusion shall be devoted, may be stated as follows: how can we relate more recent accounts of forgiveness that pretend to universality to an otherwise predominant tendency to historicize the concept of forgiveness? 

Interests

Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century moral theory (British, French, German); Seventeenth and eighteenth-century French novel; Diderot and d’Alembert’s Encyclopédie; Historical semantics; Secularization.

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

36045 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.120
show description

Course Description:

In this course we will read a number of literary masterpieces from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the genre evolved during this period.  We will examine how shifts in the basic frameworks of understanding the passions and the emotions necessitated changes in the ways that the personal experiences of fictional characters were both narrated and evaluated.  The course will also examine poetry and artwork from the period.

 

Students are expected to read all texts in the original French.  Class discussion will be carried out predominantly in French. Texts to be read include but are not limited to: Balzac, Sarrazine; Camus, L’Etranger; Chateaubriand, Atala; Duras, L’Amant; Zola, Thérèse Raquin, along with a selection of poems by Baudelaire (to be posted to Blackboard).

 

Grading Rubric:

Class participation:                                          25%

Journal entries:                                                35%

Final papers:                                                    40%

FR 390L • The Passions And The Virtues

36100 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm HRH 2.106C
show description

 Course Description

The overarching aim of this course is to examine the sources and consequences of what was an overwhelming tendency within French Enlightenment literature and thought to posit that selfishness is the motivating force behind all moral action. As such, it will relate the revalorization of amour-propre by thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Holbach, Diderot, Voltaire and Condillac to both earlier and contemporaneous attacks on all forms of self-interest, such as those leveled by Pascal, Fénelon, Racine and Rousseau. Throughout the course we will be elucidating the precise stakes and claims of discussions concerning self-interest in Enlightenment moral discourse through an analysis of both literary and philosophical texts. In the process we will consider the extent to which such discussions may be read as both a response and a challenge to the decidedly religious tenor of prevailing seventeenth-century discussions of morality. The course concludes with works by Madame de Staël, Benjamin Constant, Kant and Nietzsche. These texts will enable us to specify how later thinkers in both France and Germany continued the debate regarding the relation of self-interest to human moral impulse.

     Goals

Students will come away from the course with: comprehensive knowledge as to the central themes and issues within eighteenth-century moral discourse, with an emphasis on the French Enlightenment; familiarity with most of the major French Enlightenment thinkers who addressed morality in their writings, as well as with many of these thinkers’ immediate intellectual precursors and successors; an understanding of the effects of secularization on moral discourse during this period, as well as knowledge as to many of the prevailing religious discourses that influenced—either positively or negatively—Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment moral discourse (i.e. Jansenism, the Jesuits, Protestantism, Quietism, Deism); a good idea as to how the interplay between philosophy and literature during this period contributed to prevailing visions of morality; the successes and failures of the Enlightenment project in re-defining morality.

 

II. Pre-requisites: reading knowledge of French is required.  Prior knowledge of eighteenth-century thought is not a requirement for this course.

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

36970 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BEN 1.108
show description

Course Description:

In this course we will read a number of literary masterpieces from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the genre evolved during this period.  We will examine how shifts in the basic frameworks of understanding the passions and the emotions necessitated changes in the ways that the personal experiences of fictional characters were both narrated and evaluated.  The course will also examine poetry and artwork from the period.

 

Students are expected to read all texts in the original French.  Class discussion will be carried out predominantly in French. Texts to be read include but are not limited to: Balzac, Sarrazine; Camus, L’Etranger; Chateaubriand, Atala; Duras, L’Amant; Zola, Thérèse Raquin, along with a selection of poems by Baudelaire (to be posted to Blackboard).

 

Grading Rubric:

Class participation:                                          25%

Journal entries:                                                35%

Final papers:                                                    40%

FR 356 • 18th-Century French Novel

36980 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm HRH 2.112
show description

18th-century French Novel

 

In this course we will read a number of literary masterpieces from the eighteenth century, as well as some critical works.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the genre evolved during this period.  We will examine the ways in which shifts in the basic frameworks of understanding the passions and the emotions necessitated changes in the ways that the personal experiences of fictional characters were both narrated and evaluated.  The course concludes with readings by French Enlightenment writers.  Our focus here will be on the degree to which political concerns and the desire to utilize literature as a vehicle for social and political change resulted in a dramatic re-evaluation of the genre.  Primary texts to be studied in the course include but are not limited to: Montesquieu, Les Lettres persanes; Voltaire, Zadig; Diderot, La Religieuse; Laclos, Les Liaisons dangereuses; Bernadin de Saint-Pierre, Paul et Virginie.

 

Assignments: students will be expected to keep a journal on their readings, which will be collected periodically throughout the semester; one seminar paper (10-12 pages in length).

 

Evaluation: Final paper 40%; journal 35%; class participation 25%.

 

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

37295 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

37130 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.122
show description

Course Description:

In this course we will read a number of literary masterpieces from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the genre evolved during this period.  We will examine how shifts in the basic frameworks of understanding the passions and the emotions necessitated changes in the ways that the personal experiences of fictional characters were both narrated and evaluated.  The course will also examine poetry and artwork from the period.

 

Students are expected to read all texts in the original French.  Class discussion will be carried out predominantly in French. Texts to be read include but are not limited to: Balzac, Sarrazine; Camus, L’Etranger; Chateaubriand, Atala; Duras, L’Amant; Zola, Thérèse Raquin, along with a selection of poems by Baudelaire (to be posted to Blackboard).

 

Grading Rubric:

Class participation:                                          25%

Journal entries:                                                35%

Final papers:                                                    40%

FR 390L • French Novel In Long 18th Cent

37205 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm HRH 2.106C
show description

In this course we will read a number of literary masterpieces from the eighteenth century, as well as some critical works.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the genre evolved during this period.  We will examine the ways in which shifts in the basic frameworks of understanding the passions and the emotions necessitated changes in the ways that the personal experiences of fictional characters were both narrated and evaluated.  The course concludes with readings by French Enlightenment writers.  Our focus here will be on the degree to which political concerns and the desire to utilize literature as a vehicle for social and political change resulted in a dramatic re-evaluation of the genre.  Primary texts to be studied in the course include: ; Laclos, Les Liaisons dangereuses; Marivaux, La Vie de Marianne; Prévost, Le Philosophe Anglais, ou Histoire du Monsieur Cleveland; Retif de La Bretonne, Les Nuits de Paris Rousseau; La Nouvelle Héloïse;. Students are asked to read Mme de Lafayette’s La Princesse Clèves early in the term if they have not already.

Goals:

Students will come away from the course with: comprehensive knowledge as to the central themes and issues within eighteenth-century moral and aesthetic discourse and how those played out in literature of the period; familiarity with the major figures in eighteenth-century fiction, as well as some knowledge as to how secularization and the Enlightenment project affected the genre of the novel.

Grading:

Grading Rubric:

Class participation:                                         25%

Journal entries:                                              35%

Final papers:                                                  40%

 

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36820 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

36845 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm HRH 2.112
show description

Course Description:

In this course we will read a number of literary masterpieces from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which the genre evolved during this period.  We will examine how shifts in the basic frameworks of understanding the passions and the emotions necessitated changes in the ways that the personal experiences of fictional characters were both narrated and evaluated.  The course will also examine poetry and artwork from the period.

 

Students are expected to read all texts in the original French.  Class discussion will be carried out predominantly in French. Texts to be read include but are not limited to: Balzac, Sarrazine; Camus, L’Etranger; Chateaubriand, Atala; Duras, L’Amant; Zola, Thérèse Raquin, along with a selection of poems by Baudelaire (to be posted to Blackboard).

 

Grading Rubric:

Class participation:                                          25%

Journal entries:                                                35%

Final papers:                                                    40%

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36755 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am HRH 2.112
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 326L • Intro Fr Lit II: Fr Rev-Pres

36785 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.212
show description

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the reading and analysis of representative texts from the eighteenth century to the present.  Particular attention will be paid to the historical and cultural background from which these texts emerged.  The seminar will be conducted entirely in French.  The students will be required to keep a journal and write a final seminar paper (8-10 pages in length).  Texts to be studied include:

Voltaire, L'Ingenu; Chateaubriad, Rene; Flaubert, Un Coeur simple; Camus, L'Etranger; Balzac, Sarrasine; Beckett, En Attendant Godot; and Sartre, Huis clos.  Students will also be required to purchase a course packet with a selection of poetry by Baudelaire, Aragon, Follain and others.

Prerequisite: French 320E.

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36670 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BEN 1.108
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 356 • 18th-Century French Novel

36720 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.208
show description

In this course we will read a number of literary masterpieces from the
eighteenth century, as well as some critical works.  Particular attention
will be paid to the ways in which the genre of the novel evolved during this period.  We
will examine the degree to which shifts in the basic frameworks of
understanding the passions and the emotions necessitated changes in the ways
that the personal experiences of fictional characters were both narrated and
evaluated.  The course concludes with readings by French Enlightenment
writers.  Our focus here will be on the degree to which political concerns
and the desire to utilize literature as a vehicle for social and political
change resulted in a dramatic re-evaluation of the genre.  Primary texts to
be studied in the course include: Prevost, Manon Lescaut; Montesquieu, Les
Lettres persanes; Voltaire, Zadig; Rousseau, Les Solitaires and Diderot, La
Religieuse; Laclos, Les Liaisons dangereuses.
Assignments: students will be expected to keep a journal on their readings,
which will be collected periodically throughout the semester; 3 short essays
(3-5 pages in length).

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36605 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 210
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 390L • The Passions And The Virtues

36715 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 200pm-330pm PAR 214
show description

 Overview: The overarching aim of this course is to examine the sources and consequences of what was an overwhelming tendency within French Enlightenment literature and thought to posit that selfishness is the motivating force behind all moral action. As such, it will relate the revalorization of amour-propre by thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Holbach, Diderot, Voltaire and Condillac to both earlier and contemporaneous attacks on all forms of self-interest, such as those leveled by Pascal, Fénelon, Racine and Rousseau. Throughout the course we will be elucidating the precise stakes and claims of discussions concerning self-interest in Enlightenment moral discourse through an analysis of both literary and philosophical texts. In the process we will consider the extent to which such discussions may be read as both a response and a challenge to the decidedly religious tenor of prevailing seventeenth-century discussions of morality. The course concludes with works by Madame de Staël, Benjamin Constant, Kant and Nietzsche. These texts will enable us to specify how later thinkers in both France and Germany continued the debate regarding the relation of self-interest to human moral impulse.

Goals: Students will come away from the course with: comprehensive knowledge as to the central themes and issues within eighteenth-century moral discourse, with an emphasis on the French Enlightenment; familiarity with most of the major French Enlightenment thinkers who addressed morality in their writings, as well as with many of these thinkers’ immediate intellectual precursors and successors; an understanding of the effects of secularization on moral discourse during this period, as well as knowledge as to many of the prevailing religious discourses that influenced—either positively or negatively—Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment moral discourse (i.e. Jansenism, the Jesuits, Protestantism, Quietism, Deism); a good idea as to how the interplay between philosophy and literature during this period contributed to prevailing visions of morality; the successes, failures and limitations of the Enlightenment project's efforts to re-define morality.

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36870 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 2.122
show description

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FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2006. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 1-4130-0449-0; workbook 1-4130-6837-5): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 0-658-01799-5: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 0-19-861071-8: Recommended

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36875 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BEN 1.106
show description

@font-face { font-family: "Geneva"; }@font-face { font-family: "Verdana"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2006. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 1-4130-0449-0; workbook 1-4130-6837-5): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 0-658-01799-5: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 0-19-861071-8: Recommended

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36635 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 BEN 1.106
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 320E • Advanced French I

36905 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 BEN 1.106
show description

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 320E • Advanced French I

36920 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ B0.302
show description

Description of FR320E

 

FR 320E • Advanced French I

Prerequisites

FR 612, 312L, 312M, 312N, or the equivalent.

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%

Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 322E • Adv French II: Oral Emphasis

36030 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 BEN 1.106
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 322E • Adv French II: Oral Emphasis

36035 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ 2.122
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Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

Publications

“Judging Oswald within the Limits of Reason Alone in Madame de Staël’s Corinne.”  The        European Romantic Review, volume 23.2 (February, 2012): pp. 141-56.

“The Uses and Abuses of Joseph Butler’s Account of Forgiveness:  Between the Passions and the        Interests.” The South Central Review, volume 27.3(Fall, 2010): pp. 12-33.

Forgiving Men and Citizens: Anger and Subjectivity in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (forthcoming with University of Toronto Press)

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