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David Birdsong, Chair 201 W 21ST STREET STOP B7600, HRH 2.114A, AUSTIN, TX 78712 • 512-471-5531

Antonella D Del Fattore-Olson

Senior Lecturer Laurea (Master Degree in Comparative Literature), L'Università degli Studi La Sapienza. Rome, Italy

Distinguished Sr. Lecturer
Antonella D Del Fattore-Olson

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-5531/5706
  • Office: HRH 2.106B
  • Office Hours: M 1:00-2:00, W 12:30-2:00 and by app.; Tavola Italiana F 3:00-4:00 at Catus Cafe
  • Campus Mail Code: B7600

Biography

Antonella Del Fattore-Olson is from Rome, Italy. She received her Laurea in Comparative Literature and Theater with a specialization in Modern American Literature from the University of Rome (L’Università degli Studi La Sapienza).
Antonella is a Distinguished Senior Lecturer in the Department of French and Italian at the University of Texas at Austin (UT), where she has been working since 1984. She teaches Italian language and culture in lower- and upper-division courses. Every other year at UT, she offers a course on play production, the Italian Drama Workshop, in which students perform in Italian plays written by major Italian plawrights.
Antonella is the coordinator of lower-division Italian, have been supervisor of first-year Italian for many years, and is now supervisor of intensive second-year Italian, adviser and organizer of the Italian Club and advisor of study abroad programs in Italy. She is the founder and director of the Rome Study Program in Rome, Italy, sponsored by the Italian Department at UT.
She collaborated in the writing of first-year Workbook and Laboratory Manual to accompany "Italiano in diretta" and the Workbook to accompany "Insieme: An Intermediate Italian Course"; she is co-author with Eric Edwards of "In viaggio, Moving Toward Fluency in Italian," a second year textbook and its workbook, and "Radio Arlecchino: An Italian Grammar and Culture Podcast," an online resource on Italian grammar and culture. Recently, she has been working on a video project, called ITAL: 25 videos with authentic material used in intensive second-year Italian to enhance culture and reinforce the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, writing, reading.
She published articles on Dacia Maraini’s theater and the play production class, and attended numerous conferences where she presented papers on teaching methodology, Italian cinema, and Maraini’s plays.
Her fields of interest are pedagogy, theater and play production, Italian culture, cinema, and modern literature. She is also very interested in the political, social and cultural aspects of Italian dialects.



Interests

Italian Language and Culture, Teaching Methodology, Play Production, Contemporary Italian Theatre, Modern Italian Literature, Italian dialects

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37215 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 101
show description

 

Course Objectives

The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture. We will reach these goals by:

a.Reading a selection of short stories from La ragazza di Via Maqueda by Dacia Maraini and online articles,

b.Reviewing grammatical structures through the textbook In Viaggio,

c.  Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos/short movies.

 

The course is conducted exclusively in Italian.

 

WRITING FLAG COURSES (Core Component 010) 

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the communication component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and personal responsibility.  


 

Texts   

In Viaggio, Moving Towards Fluency in Italian, Olson-Edwards

La ragazza di Via Maqueda, Maraini

Dizionario Harper Collins Sansoni, standard edition (or equivalent dictionary)

 

Grade policy- The final grade will be computed as follows:

I.          10%     Quizzes & Listening Comprehension Exercises

II.         20%     Two Exams

III.       35%     Compositions (five compositions=25%, one final paper=10%)

IV.       25%     Oral Component: In-class oral performance (5%), Oral Reports (10%),

                        Final presentation (10%)    

V.        10%     Class participation

 

 

ITL F328 • Composition & Conversation-Ita

84020 • Summer 2014
Meets
show description

Rome Study Program

 

 

ITL F328 – Rome

Composition and Conversation

 

Instructor: Antonella D. Olson

 

Course Description:

 

This course is taught in Italian and is an upper-division course. The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension, both reading and listening. We will reach these goals by:

  1. Reading short stories, articles from magazines and newspapers, a novel,
  2. Reviewing the grammatical structures presented in the reading material,
  3. Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos and movies.

Furthermore, this course aims at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture through a lively interaction with Italians: students will conduct frequent interviews both in class to the invited guest speakers and on their own, outside class. Students will keep a journal of their experience in Italy, write compositions, and give in class individual and group presentations.

 

Textbooks:

Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased at Jenn’s)

Andrea De Carlo, Giro di vento     (to be purchased in Rome)

Additional reading material will be announced

 

Grading:

10%    Short Quizzes

30%    Two Exams

25%    Oral reports, Interviews

20%    Journal, Compositions

15%    Class participation, Progress in the oral component

ITL 611C • Intermediate Italian

37530 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BEN 1.108
show description

In this course, students will expand the skills they acquired in ITL 601C and by the end of ITL 611C, students will

• Be able to carry on more advanced conversations in Italian with good pronunciation, using all the verb tenses and moods learned in ITL 601C and ITL 611C;

• Possess an increased working vocabulary;

• Understand and be able to discuss more sophisticated cultural topics;

• Read and understand longer essays and authentic Italian literary texts;

• Write increasingly longer compositions in Italian using grammatically correct prose.

 

Class time will be devoted primarily to developing speaking and comprehension skills in the target language; this will be done primarily through group activities and students will be active participants in the learning process.

ITL 348 • Italian Drama Workshop

37450 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm FAC 21
show description

This course is taught in Italian.

Through performing art skills, the course intends to reach three main goals:

1. A deeper understanding of the Italian culture and history;

2. Improvement in the pronunciation and intonation;

3. Progress in the Italian language.

 

The course is divided in three parts:

First Part:                  Students will read the play Filumena Marturano by Eduardo De Filippo, watch the movie Matrimonio all’italiana by Vittorio De Sica, and conduct individual and group researches on social, literary, and historical issues related to the play.  

Second Part:             Roles distribution, students will begin rehearsing the play and memorizing

                                    their lines.

Third Part:                                    Students will complete the memorization of their roles, continue rehearsing,

                                    and stage the play. There will be three public performances of the play

                                    at the end of the semester. Memorization of the roles must be finalized by

      October 30; this means that the students/actors will be “off book” by then and

      will have their lines completely memorized.

 

Rehearsals| Prove           

Students will be asked to attend some of the extra rehearsals (5:00-6:00) in the

second part of the semester and all of the extra rehearsals in the third part of the semester.

By the end of September, the instructor will give a schedule for all the extra rehearsals beside the ones already indicated on the syllabus. Please check on the syllabus the dates&times of the final performances (evenings Dec. 2, 3, 4, 5)

 

Global Culture | Cultura Globale

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase students’ familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. Students should therefore expect a substantial portion of the grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 

 

 

ITL F328 • Composition & Conversation-Ita

84372 • Summer 2013
Meets
show description

Rome Study Program

 

 

ITL F328 – Rome

Composition and Conversation

 

Instructor: Antonella D. Olson

 

Course Description:

 

This course is taught in Italian and is an upper-division course. The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension, both reading and listening. We will reach these goals by:

  1. Reading short stories, articles from magazines and newspapers, a novel,
  2. Reviewing the grammatical structures presented in the reading material,
  3. Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos and movies.

Furthermore, this course aims at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture through a lively interaction with Italians: students will conduct frequent interviews both in class to the invited guest speakers and on their own, outside class. Students will keep a journal of their experience in Italy, write compositions, and give in class individual and group presentations.

 

Textbooks:

Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased at Jenn’s)

Andrea De Carlo, Giro di vento     (to be purchased in Rome)

Additional reading material will be announced

 

Grading:

10%    Short Quizzes

30%    Two Exams

25%    Oral reports, Interviews

20%    Journal, Compositions

15%    Class participation, Progress in the oral component

ITL 611C • Intermediate Italian

37125 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BEN 1.108
show description

ITL 611 C – Spring 2014     COURSE DESCRIPTION

Multi-section course

Supervisor: Antonella Del Fattore-Olson, adolson@austin.utexas.edu

 

 

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS

Aski, Musumeci Avanti! Beginning Italian, 3

Includes Avanti, 3/e Loose-Leaf

CONNECT PLUS ITALIAN LEARNSMART (with WBLM) ACCESS CARD FOR AVANTI 3/e

Adorni. English Grammar for Students of Italian (to be purchased separately)

Packet of Xerox-copied material-University Coop

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

In ITL 611 C, students pick up where they left off at the end of ITL 601C and study the six final chapters of the textbook Avanti!, do the exercises on the online workbook that accompanies Avanti! and read English Grammar for Students of Italian as a grammar reference, at home and, if possible, in class. In addition, ITL 611C makes use of other resources:

-           The online Italian grammar and culture podcasts of Radio Arlecchino, which will deepen students’ understanding of several of the more difficult grammar points that we will cover in the course;

-           Modules of the ITAL Video Project: each module consists of several videos that we will use to enhance listening, speaking, and writing skills and expand knowledge of Italian culture;

-           Short readings to improve reading skills.

In this course, students will expand the skills they acquired in ITL 601C and by the end of ITL 611C, students will

• be able to carry on more advanced conversations in Italian with good pronunciation, using all the verb tenses and moods learned in ITL 601C and ITL 611C;

• possess an increased working vocabulary;

• understand and be able to discuss more sophisticated cultural topics;

• read and understand longer essays and authentic Italian literary texts;

• write increasingly longer compositions in Italian using grammatically correct prose.

Class time will be devoted primarily to developing speaking and comprehension skills in the target language; this will be done primarily through group activities and students will be active participants in the learning process. In order to make the most effective use of class time, students are required to have prepared the assigned homework for each given day; students should expect to spend at least 12 hours every week for homework; that is at least TWO hours every day. This course is for students of Italian who have successfully completed ITL 601C at UT-Austin; consult with your instructor and the undergraduate advisor for the Department of French and Italian if your previous experience with Italian does not include successful completion of ITL 601C.

 

 

 

GRADING

Five Tests                                                                                           25%

Oral Exam (administered individually)                                                        5%

Final Exam                                                                                          15%

Five Compositions (four with re-write)                                                       15%

Five Skits (presented in groups)                                                               15%

Mega Skit (digital story presented in groups)                                               5%

Online Workbook                                                                                  10%

Class Participation                                                                                 10%

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37090 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.202
show description

ITL 328 - Composition and Conversation

Instructor: Antonella D. Olson

Course Description:

This course is taught in Italian and is an upper-division course. The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension, both reading and listening. We will reach these goals by:
a.    Reading short stories, articles from magazines and newspapers, a novel,
b.    Reviewing the grammatical structures presented in the reading material,
c.    Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos and movies.
Furthermore, this course aims at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture through a lively interaction with the local Italian community. Students will keep a journal, write compositions, and give in class individual and group presentations.

Textbooks:
Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased at Jenn’s)
Additional reading material will be announced

Grading:
15%    Short Quizzes
30%    Two Exams
20%    Oral reports
20%    Journal, Compositions
15%    Class participation, Progress in the oral component



ITL F328 • Composition & Conversation-Ita

84490 • Summer 2012
Meets
show description

Rome Study Program


ITL F328 – Rome
Composition and Conversation

Instructor: Antonella D. Olson

Course Description:

This course is taught in Italian and is an upper-division course. The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension, both reading and listening. We will reach these goals by:
a.    Reading short stories, articles from magazines and newspapers, a novel,
b.    Reviewing the grammatical structures presented in the reading material,
c.    Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos and movies.
Furthermore, this course aims at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture through a lively interaction with Italians: students will conduct frequent interviews both in class to the invited guest speakers and on their own, outside class. Students will keep a journal of their experience in Italy, write compositions, and give in class individual and group presentations.

Textbooks:
Packet of Xerox-copied material (to be purchased at Jenn’s)
Andrea De Carlo, Giro di vento     (to be purchased in Rome)
Additional reading material will be announced

Grading:
10%    Short Quizzes
30%    Two Exams
25%    Oral reports, Interviews
20%    Journal, Compositions
15%    Class participation, Progress in the oral component

ITL 601C • Beginning Italian

36960 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.202
show description

ITL 601 C – Italian Language and Culture             Spring 2012
Multi-section course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

TEXTBOOKS:
Required: Aski, Musumeci – Avanti! Second edition with Quia online Workbook/Lab Manual
Required: Adorni- English Grammar for Students of Italian (to be purchased separately)

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
In ITL 601 C, students will study eleven of the sixteen chapters of the textbook Avanti!, do the exercises on the online workbook that accompanies Avanti! and read English Grammar for Students of Italian as a grammar reference, at home and, time permitting, in class.

By the end of ITL 601 C, students will:
• be able to carry on a conversation in Italian and perform in skits with good
   pronunciation, using all the verbal tenses and moods learned in ITL 601 C;
• possess a sizeable vocabulary;
• be capable of understanding and discussing simple cultural topics;
• write short compositions in Italian using grammatically correct prose;
• read short essays.

Class time will be spent primarily in developing the ability to speak and understand the target language; in-class group activities will be largely used and students will be active participants in the learning process. Students will keep a portfolio containing all their weekly writing activities. Since class time must be devoted to practicing the Italian language, students are required to have prepared the assigned homework for each given day; students should expect to spend at least 2 hours per day, for a total of at least 12 hours every week, for homework.
This course is for beginner students of Italian; if you have already been exposed to the Italian language, you should take a placement test in accordance with the UT policies on academic dishonesty.

The Lower-Division Grading Scale for Italian is the following:
97-93 A     69-67 D+
92-90 A-     66-63 D
89-87 B+     62-60 D-
86-83 B     Less than 60 F
82-80 B-
79-77 C+
76-73 C
72-70 C



GRADING:
(1) Four Chapter Tests                                                  20%
(2) Final Exam                                                             15%
(3) Portfolio weekly activities and 2 compositions            20%    

(4) Oral performance

--General class performance 5%, Skits 10%,
Oral Exam 5%, Oral Report on Italian culture 5%--         25%    
(5) Attendance, Class Participation                                10%
(6) Online Workbook/Lab Manual                                   10%

ITL 329 • Adv Composition And Conversatn

37025 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 2.122
show description

ITL 329 - Advanced Composition and Conversation      Spring 2012

Instructor:
Antonella Del Fattore-Olson
HRH  2.106 B, # 471-5706/471-5531; ad.olson@mail.utexas.edu

Texts:
On Blackboard:
G. Patota, Grammatica di riferimento della lingua italiana per stranieri –
K. Katerinov, La lingua italiana per stranieri -
To purchase:
Folder of Xerox-copied material - Jenn's, 2200 Guadalupe
D. Maraini, La ragazza di via Maqueda – Co-Op
Dictionary Harper Collins Sansoni, standard edition (or equivalent)

Description:
The goals of this course are to improve students' skills in writing and speaking in Italian and to expand their knowledge of Italian culture. We will reach these goals by reading short stories, poems, and articles (analyzing them both for their content and linguistic format), reviewing grammatical structures, and expanding lexicon. Videos, songs and two films will be used as pedagogical tools for a deeper understanding of the Italian language and culture. The course is conducted entirely in Italian.
Participation- Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, two points will be deducted from the final grade; three points for the fifth absence, and so on. Students will be asked to come to class well prepared on the readings and the grammar structures assigned and ready to participate to class discussions.
Compositions- Proper use of grammar will greatly affect the grade on compositions as well as the content. Students have to turn in compositions on the days indicated on the syllabus. For the re-writings, please always staple the first version of the composition.Students will write: a) Three short compositions (Temi Brevi); the first two will have a rewriting; b) Two long compositions; the first one will be written in class and will have a rewriting (TEMA I A and B). Please see titles and instructions for most of the TEMI at the end of the syllabus.
Tests- There will be two quizzes focusing mainly on the grammar studied and two exams focusing on the grammar and the readings.
Oral Reports- Students will give two oral presentations in class:
 a) PRESENTAZIONE I - Each student will lead class discussion for one of the readings assigned on the syllabus and will come to class prepared to present a summary of the reading, make a personal comment on it (for a total of 5 minutes), and ask students questions about it.
Evaluation’s criteria: pronunciation, content, grammar, and vocabulary.
b) PRESENTAZIONE II - In groups, a 15-20 min. sketch in Italian. Students will form groups. Each student will speak for about 10 minutes.
Evaluation’s criteria: pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, creativity, and fluency.

The final grade will be computed as follows:

25%        Short compositions (3) and quizzes (2)        
15%        Long Compositions (2)
15%        Class participation, homework, in-class group activities            
20%        Exams (2)
25%        General oral performance and progress; oral reports


    




ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

36957 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.202
show description

Focuses on idioms, grammar, syntax, and style.

Prerequisite: Italian 612, 312L, or 317C with a grade of at least C.

ITL 348 • Italian Drama Workshop

36965 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm FAC 21
show description

Intensive analysis of one or several plays or short literary texts, with emphasis on diction, delivery of lines, and acting and staging.

Prerequisite: Italian 326K, 326L, and 328 with a grade of at least C in each.

May be counted toward the global cultures flag requirement.

ITL F348 • Italian Drama Workshop-Rome

84455 • Summer 2011
Meets
show description

ITL 348 - Italian Drama Workshop |  Rome Study Program – Summer 2011, Rome, Italy


Instructor:
    Antonella Del Fattore-Olson |tel.: (011-39) 3331946033 |e-mail ad.olson@mail.utexas.edu

Texts:
    Packet to be purchased in Rome (Copy Point in via de’ Funari, 25)
    Esercizi di stile di Raymond Queneau , translated by Umberto Eco


Course Description:

    This course is taught in Italian. Through performing art skills, the course intends to reach three main goals: 1. progress in the Italian language, 2. improvement in the pronunciation and intonation, 3. deeper understanding of the Italian culture.
Students will keep a journal, read articles from magazines and newspapers and give oral reports on the chosen articles; they will also conduct weekly interviews with Italians.
At the beginning of the smester, students will study the most prominent authors and works of Italian theater from Middle Ages to contemporary times. Students will then focus on Esercizi di stile by Raymond Queneau with translation by Umberto Eco, memorize a selection from the Queneau’s book, write their own skits in Italian, following Queneau/Eco’s style to present them in the final public performance at the end of the program.

Grading:
30%    Progress in the oral skills, intonation, and memorization
20%    Oral reports on culture and for the final play (interviews with Italians; newspapers/magazines)
10%    Participation
10%    Journal (Three entries)
30%    Rehearsals, Final Performances

ITL 506 • First-Yr Itl I: Lang And Cul

37160 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.118
show description

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         ITL 506 - COURSE DESCRIPTION

TEXTS

Required:          Aski, Musumeci – Avanti! Second edition with Quia online Workbook/Lab Manual

Optional:          Adorny- English Grammar for Students of Italian (to be purchased separately)

 

Supervisor-First Year Italian: 

Antonella D. Olson, HRH # 2.106 B,   # 471-5706/ 471-5531    ad.olson@mail.utexas.edu

Department of French and Italian http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/frenchitalian/undergraduate_italian/

 

OBJECTIVES

ITL 506 is the first semester of first year Italian - the sequence being:  a) First year: ITL 506, 507;

b) Second year: ITL 118 (can be taken twice), ITL 612.  Students need to make a C or better to enroll in ITL 507. In the first year Italian, students will learn most of the basic grammar structures of the Italian language. By the end of ITL 506, we expect students to be able to carry on a basic conversation in Italian with good pronunciation, and correct use of the grammar learned.  Students will be capable of understanding cultural topics presented in Italian by the instructor and the students. They will be reading short essays and will be able to write complete paragraphs in Italian. Class time will be primarily developing the ability to speak and understand the target language with students being active participants. The lessons will be conducted mostly in Italian.

 

GRADING

1)             Chapter Tests (six)            30%

2)            Exam I            10%

3)            Final Exam             20%

4)            Compositions (five)            10%

5)            General Oral performance and

            Oral Exam            10%

6)            Class Participation and Attendance             10%

7)            Online Workbook/Lab Manual            10%

 

1), 2), 3) – Texts and Exams: There will be six chapter tests (chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7), one 50- minute exam with oral and written parts and a cumulative final exam with oral and written parts during finals period.

 

4) – Compositions: Students will write a total of five compositions and will use a bluebook for all of them. Two of them will be written in class and three at home (homework). All the three compositions done at home will have a re-write and the grade of each is the average of first draft and final version.

The first in class composition will be preceded by a writing group activity leaded by your instructor.

 

5)  - General oral performance and Oral Exam:

General Oral performance: The ability to communicate in Italian, to speak and to understand. Its evaluation will be based upon students’ oral responses in class and their ability to ask questions in Italian. Pronunciation is an important aspect of your overall oral performance.

Oral Exam: To succeed in the exam, it’s important to practice regularly in class by actively participating in group-activities as well as practicing outside of class; the online oral exercises, studying with other students of 506, attending the events offered by Circolo Italiano (Tavola and Cineclub) will help a great deal. The exams will cover all the grammatical structures and vocabulary studied before the exam’s date.

The exam will take place in class (and in the instructor’s office if more time is needed).

Each student must choose a partner; together they will have a conversation with the instructor that reflects the vocabulary and grammatical structures learned thus far.

Length: approx. 10 minutes per couple. Evaluation’s criteria:

Pronunciation - Comprehension - Ability to ask questions - Vocabulary - Proper use of grammar.

 

6) - Class participation and Attendance:

Class participation: Daily preparation and regular classroom attendance is essential to your success in learning Italian.  Class participation is evaluated not only by your regular classroom attendance, but also by the quality of your participation and contribution to the lesson. A wide range of class activities will focus on Italian culture and your instructor will devote class time –ideally 50 minutes per week- to immerse students into Italian culture through songs, videos, clips from movies, group activities such as games, dialogues, improvisation, etc.

In addition, the instructor reserves the right to administer pop quizzes for class participation as needed.

Be aware that more than 10 absences (excused or not) will automatically result in a zero in this component.

Attendance: Its importance cannot be overemphasized.  Not only will your grade reflect your classroom attendance, but the quality of your learning experience as well.  It is the class that will generate the enthusiasm and support prerequisite to language learning.  Alone you may be able to master word lists and grammar rules, but only in the classroom will these abstractions become part of a living language.

You are allowed eight (8) absences (excused or unexcused) or six (6) if your class meets MTWTH. Starting with the ninth (9th) absence --or with the seventh (7th) if your class meets MTWTH-- your final grade will be lowered by 1% for each absence. For example, if your grade is 81 B- and you have 10 absences, your grade will be lowered by 2% and will become a 79 C+. The effect of the absences on your grade will be calculated at the end of the semester when all the grades are in, including the grade on the final exam.

 

7) - Online Workbook/Lab Manual: Centro website www.mhcentro.com

Students are expected to complete the online workbook/laboratory manual exercises that pertain to the material covered in class on a daily basis. (Hint: Technology may fail you at the most inappropriate time, so do not wait the last minute to do your homework!) You can access the activities on the Avanti! website www.mhcentro.com and log in with the ID which you purchased with the textbook.

For each chapter you will complete the practice activities in the Centro online workbook (for info on how to access Centro, see below).

ONLINE WORKBOOK: Be sure to complete ALL items in ALL assigned activities to the best of your ability. After you have finished and submitted an activity, the errors will be indicated and the correct answers provided for all non-discursive items. We strongly recommend that you go over the correct answers.

AVANTI! – Online Workbook/Laboratory Manual - Instructions for Students’ registration

Your instructor, ________________________________________, invites you to enroll in the following course: Fall 2010 Italian 506

Code:             JAP939

Book:             Avanti! Beginning Italian: Online Workbook / Laboratory Manual, 2nd Edition

Creating a Centro Account

If you do not have an account, you need to create one. To do so, follow these steps:

   1. Go to http://www.mhcentro.com and click Create an account.

   2. Select a username and password and enter your information, then click Submit.

Note: Remember to write down your username and password and be sure to select the correct time zone. Also, please enter a valid e-mail address so we can send you your password if you forget it.

Entering the Book Key and Course Code (JAP939)

Enter the book key and course code to complete the enrollment process. You may need to purchase a book key, you may already have a book key that you purchased separately, or you may already have activated the book for a previous course. Depending on your situation, use one of the procedures below. The course code is listed at the top of this page.

Once you have completed this step, the system lists the course and book on the Student Workstation home page. To enter additional books, enter a book key in the Enter book key field and click Go.

Note: Book keys can only be used once. Your book key will become invalid after you use it.

I need to purchase a book key

   1. Go to http://www.mhcentro.com and log in.

   2. Click Bookstore at the top of the Student Workstation window.

   3. Enter search criteria for the book and click Search.

   4. Locate the book in the search results and click Buy.

   5. Enter the course code, JAP939, and click Next.

   6. Proceed through the purchase process.

I already have a book key

   1. Go to http://www.mhcentro.com and log in.

   2. Enter the book key in the Enter book key field at the top of the Student Workstation window and

       click Go.

   3. Click Confirm to confirm your registration information.

      The system displays the Student Workstation and lists the book under the My books heading.

   4. Beside the book listing, enter the course code, JAP939, in the Enter course code field and click Go.

   5. If necessary, select a class (section) and click Submit.

Using Centro

To access your Student Workstation in the future, go to http://www.mhcentro.com and log in. Here, you can open your book, submit activities, view your results, and view your instructor's feedback.

If you have any questions, contact Quia Centro Support at http://www.mhcentro.com/support.html

Phone: 8772824400 ext. 2  

Monday through Friday 8:00-5:00 (Pacific Standard Time, we are on Central Time!)

 

Use of BLACKBOARD in Class

In this class instructors use Blackboard—a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu —to distribute course materials, to communicate and

collaborate online, and to submit assign­ments. You can find support in using Blackboard at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

 

MAKE-UP POLICY

There will be NO make-ups in tests, exams, compositions or finals and no extensions for the online exercises will be given without a written doctor's excuse or a letter from the student's dean.

 

OFFICE HOURS

During the first week of classes, your instructor will announce his/her office hours.  This is a time for you to work individually with your instructor on any aspect of the material covered in class.

 

 TUTORS

 Please refer to the French and Italian Department’s web page or visit the

 French and Italian Department’s Undergraduate Office in HRH

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/frenchitalian/resources/tutors_translators/

Be aware that tutors ARE NOT ALLOWED to do homework for you rather give you individual attention in mastering complex grammatical structures and oral skills. Moreover, if the professor deems--due to a discrepancy with your oral and written performance in class--that your homework has been done with the help of a computer-translation-program or a tutor, you will receive a 'no-grade' for that paper; the 'no-grade' will neither lower nor raise your overall grade average.

 

IL CIRCOLO ITALIANO

Throughout the semester, the Italian Club shows six Italian movies and offers the Tavola, weekly meetings where students can practice Italian in an informal setting, every Friday, 4:00-5:00, at the Cactus Café (Texas Union). Additional events sponsored by the Italian Club will be announced in class.

 

ROME STUDY PROGRAM - DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH AND ITALIAN

The Rome Study Program gives students of all majors the opportunity to spend six weeks in Rome, Italy during the first summer session, earn six credit hours and visit some of the most beautiful Italian sites on weekends. Italian families host students providing an in-depth experience of Italian life-style and language. Please visit our website: http://sites.google.com/site/romestudyprogram/Home

and/or contact Program Director: Antonella D. Olson, HRH # 2.106 B,   # 471-5706/5531, ad.olson@mail.utexas.edu

                         

                                                   Auguri per un buon inizio in Italiano!

 

ITL 329 • Adv Composition And Conversatn

37250 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Description:

The goals of this course are to improve students' skills in writing and speaking in Italian and to expand their knowledge of Italian culture. We will reach these goals by: a) reviewing the most complex grammatical structures, b) reading short stories, articles from magazines, and a novel, c) reflecting upon the use of dialects of some Italian regions. Videos, songs and two films will be used as pedagogical tools for a deeper understanding of the Italian language and culture. The course is conducted entirely in Italian.

Grading:

25%   Three short compositions and two quizzes       15%    Two long Compositions

15%   Class participation, homework                         20%   Two exams

25%   General oral performance and progress; oral reports

Textbooks:

Patota, Giuseppe. 2003. Grammatica di riferimento della lingua italiana per stranieri. Firenze: Le Monnier.

Maraini, Dacia. La ragazza di via Maqueda. Rizzoli. 2009.

Folder of Xerox-copied material available at Jenn’s, 2200 Guadalupe.

Dizionario Harper Collins Sansoni, standard edition or equivalent.



ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

36765 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm JES A215A
show description

Prerequisites: ITL 312L or ITL 612 or the equivalent 

Course Description

The goal of this course is the student's progress toward mastering the Italian language. Students will focus on enriching their vocabulary and expanding their knowledge of Italian culture. Reading material, songs, videos, and films will be used to reach this goal.

In this course, students will review basic and advanced grammatical structures (expanding on some of them) and will read the material presented in the packet, which consists of articles from newspapers/ magazines and short stories. Students will also read a short novel. Class discussions and conversation sessions will be based on such material. There will be two oral reports: a) one individual oral presentation on Italian culture, and b) one in groups. Students will also watch three Italian movies outside of class. Some of the subjects of the compositions will be based upon the movies. Regular attendance is required as well as active participation in class.

Grading Policy

Quizzes: 15%

Exam I: 10%

Exam II: 15%

Compositions: 25%

Oral Reports and General Oral Performance: 25%

Class Participation: 10%

Texts

Folder of xerocopied material (Jenn's, 2200 Guadalupe)

Patota, Giuseppe. 2003. Grammatica di riferimento della lingua italiana per stranieri. Firenze: Le Monnier.

Novel: TBA

Dizionario, Harper Collins Sansoni or equivalent

 

Other Information

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/frenchitalian/undergraduate_italian/

 

ITL 312K • Second-Year Italian I-Rome

84000 • Summer 2010
Meets
show description

First Session French and Italian program in Rome.

ITL 312L • Second-Year Italian II

37010 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm BEN 1.108
show description

ITL 312L • primavera 2010 • Descrizione del corso
(Course Description)
ITL 312L: Second-Year Italian Language and Culture II

   Your instructor is _________________________________________
 
               E-mail _________________________________________

               Office _________________________________________

         Office Hours _________________________________________

State- and University-mandated information:
Required University Notices and Policies

University of Texas Honor Code
The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Documented Disability Statement
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or
http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence to Students
E-mail is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are responsible for reading your e-mail for university and course-related information and announcements. You are responsible to keep the university informed about changes to your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently—it is recommended that you do so daily—to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You can find UT Austin’s policies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at
http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php

Religious Holy Days
By UT Austin policy, you must notify your instructor of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, your instructor will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)
If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit

http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal

Resources for Learning & Life at UT Austin
The University of Texas has numerous resources for students to provide assistance and support for your learning.

The UT Learning Center:
http://www.utexas.edu/student/utlc/

Undergraduate Writing Center:
http://uwc.utexas.edu/

Counseling & Mental Health Center: http://cmhc.utexas.edu/

Career Exploration Center: http://www.utexas.edu/student/careercenter/

Student Emergency Services: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/emergency/

Emergency Evacuation Policy
Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made. Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:
Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.

If you require assistance to evacuate, inform your instructor in writing during the first week of class.

In the event of an evacuation, follow your instructor’s instructions.

Do not re-enter a building unless you’re given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office

 
Q drop Policy
The State of Texas has enacted a law that limits the number of course drops for academic reasons to six (6). As stated in Senate Bill 1231:
“Beginning with the fall 2007 academic term, an institution of higher education may not permit an undergraduate student a total of more than six dropped courses, including any course a transfer student has dropped at another institution of higher education, unless the student shows good cause for dropping more than that number.”

====================================================

NOTE: If you have been absent and need information about class, consult announcements posted on Blackboard or contact a classmate.

Class is conducted in ITALIAN.

Texts: REQUIRED
In viaggio: Moving towards Fluency in Italian. Olson, Edwards, Foerster. Available at the University Co-Op on Guadalupe.
Workbook/Laboratory Manual Part B to Accompany In viaggio. Olson, Edwards. Available at the University Co-Op on Guadalupe. THE COVER IS WHITE AND LIGHT GREEN.
Web resource (REQUIRED)
the grammar and culture podcasts of Radio Arlecchino. Information and assignments will be made available in class and through Blackboard. http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/ra/index.php

NOTE that a corrected version of the answer key to the Workbook/Lab Manual is available on Blackboard. (Course Documents)

We will go over exercises from the "Pratica scritta" sections of the Workbook/Lab Manual as indicated in class. Your instructor may regularly collect workbook/lab manual pages that have been assigned.

Completion of the exercises from the "Pratica orale" sections is also required. Students may complete them in the Liberal Arts Computer Media Lab, MEZ 2.104,
http://www.laits.utexas.edu/its/medialab.html
or via the web on Blackboard.
(Course Documents --> Chapter --> Audio Program)

Our goal is to spend as little time as possible in class explaining grammar that you have already encountered in the first-year courses or that is thoroughly explained in English in the "spiegazioni grammaticali" in the back (le pagine verdi) of In viaggio. But please do not hesitate to let your instructor know when these grammatical concepts are not clear to you after you have worked on them in these materials.

 
ITL 312L is the fourth course in a two-year, four-semester sequence:
ITL 506: First-Year Italian Language & Culture I
ITL 507: 1st-Year Italian Language & Culture II
(ITL 118: Practice in Spoken Italian; may be taken more than once; prerequisite is ITL 507)
ITL 312K: Second-Year Italian Language & Culture I
ITL 312L: Second-Year Italian Language & Culture II

Students must receive a grade "C" or above in any of these courses in order to enroll in the next course in the sequence. If you received a "D" or a lower grade in ITL 312K or the equivalent, you may not take this course.

In the first-year courses students were introduced to most of the basic grammatical structures of the Italian language and acquired a limited, basic vocabulary with limited time available for speaking practice.

In the second-year courses, students begin moving toward fluency in Italian by focusing on seven major communicative functions: describing, comparing, recommending and expressing opinions, narrating in the past, expressing likes and dislikes, hypothesizing and talking about the future. Grammar from the first-year courses is reviewed, and new grammar points are presented, always with the intention of developing and strengthening students' abilities to use these seven communicative functions. A wide range of cultural topics is explored in the second-year courses, as each chapter of our text focuses on a different region of Italy.

IMPORTANTE! It is the sole responsibility of each student to be aware of and to meet the various deadlines imposed by the University and its Schools and Colleges concerning the adding and dropping of courses, payment of tuition and fees, changing grade basis (letter grade, credit/nocredit) and withdrawing from the university.

If you find that personal or family emergencies or illness prevent you from attending class or from completing a significant number of required assignments, you should DROP THIS COURSE. The method for calculating your course grade will be the same for all students and under no circumstances will your instructor apply different criteria for calculating your course grade. Neither should you expect your instructor to violate university or departmental policies in assigning your course grade.

Grading: Your grade in this course will be calculated as follows:

   Chapter Tests (2).................25%
   Componimenti (3 compositions).....10%
   Esami orali (2 rounds)............10%
   Quizzes (9).......................15%
   Participation & Oral Performance..20%
   Final Exam........................20%

Tests. Two Chapter Tests are given during the semester, according to the  schedule found on the Syllabus (il nostro programma)
    On the listening comprehension part only your answers may be written on the exam sheet. No part of the questions or of the passages read by the instructor may be written down anywhere on the exam sheet.
    The tests will evaluate mastery of the seven main communicative functions, recently covered grammatical structures and vocabulary, and will feature short essay questions over readings and other material covered in class.
    Makeups on these Tests are possible only under extreme circumstances; please do not request a makeup on a Chapter Test unless you have in fact experienced a serious emergency.

Componimenti. Three of these compositions will be due during the semester. None of these assignments may be turned in via e-mail or outside of class. They may be turned in in class only. Only two assignments (first or second versions) may be turned in late. All assignments are to be typed or machine-printed and double- or triple-spaced. Your instructor will provide you with information on topics. For the first two compiti, your instructor will mark your first version, assign a grade and return it to you, indicating a due date for your second version. The second, corrected version must be turned in on that due date with the first version attached. The grade recorded for your composition will be the average of the grade you received on the 1st version and the grade you receive on the 2nd version. The third composition will be turned in only once.

In preparing your compositions, you may consult your textbook, the workbook, the Proofreading Checklists found on Blackboard, and a dictionary. You are not to enlist the aid of any other person, faculty member, student or friend in preparing your compositions. Your instructor should be reading your work and your work only.

Esami orali. There will be a round of oral examinations near the end of the semester; see Il nostro programma (Syllabus) for the dates involved. Your instructor will provide you with details on the format of these examinations, in which you will be evaluated on pronunciation, use of vocabulary, use of the punti chiave, comprehension and fluency of expression.

Quizzes. There are 9 short quizzes throughout the semester, three in each of the numbered chapters:
Vocabolario del tema: covering the vocabulary of the chapter;
Punto chiave: covering the grammatical structures involved with the main punto chiave of the chapter;
Geografia e cultura: covering geographical and cultural information associated with the regions in focus in the chapter.
No more than 15 minutes will be allowed for each of these quizzes (some may be shorter) and makeups are possible on no more than two of the quizzes during the semester.

 
Participation and Oral Performance. Attendance in this course is mandatory. No distinction is made between “excused” and “unexcused” absences; therefore you are requested not to explain your absences (unless you are requesting a makeup on a Test or a quiz). You are either present in class or you are absent from class. In order to allow for legitimate emergencies, there is no penalty or reduction in grade points for the first five absences. Points will be deducted for every absence in excess of five as follows:

    Sixth absence            2 points
    Seventh absence        3 points
    Every absence thereafter    4 points

Note that these are points deducted from the possible 100 points that make up your grade in the course.

• Participation. For the Participation component (10 of 100 points)

for 9 or more points
Student has no more than four absences and is always prepared, i.e., has read the assigned material and is ready to respond to questions in class without reading a previously prepared text or consulting the textbook. Asks pertinent questions. Makes good use of vocabulary, especially that of the current chapter, and when unsure, is capable of effective circumlocution. When appropriate, makes good use of the scheda di vocabolario. Makes few errors in grammar associated with the punti chiave. Always speaks Italian in class and during pair or group work does not lapse into English or other languages.

for 8 to 8,99 points
Has no more than five absences and is almost always prepared. Rarely relies on previously prepared texts or the textbook in formulating responses. Usually makes good use of vocabulary; usually makes good use of the scheda di vocabolario. Only sometimes asks questions that have just been answered. Occasionally makes errors in grammar associated with the punti chiave. Almost always speaks Italian in class and during pair or group work rarely lapses into English or other languages.

for 7 to 7,99 points
Has more than five absences and is only sometimes prepared. Frequently relies on previously prepared texts (either reading from them or quoting from them from memory) or the textbook in formulating responses. Makes infrequent use of the scheda di vocabolario. Often makes errors in grammar associated with the punti chiave. Sometimes speaks Italian in class and during pair or group work often lapses into English or other languages.

 
• Oral Performance. Your oral performance in class will be evaluated on the basis of comprehension, pronunciation, use of appropriate vocabulary, ability to perform the seven communicative functions (punti chiave), and ability to converse on topics related to the themes encountered in the text. For the Oral Performance component (10 of 100 points):

for 9 or more points
Student shows marked improvement in pronunciation and intonation during the semester. Always repeats to confirm after pronunciation or stress has been corrected. Makes a clear effort to avoid American or other non-Italian pronunciation.  When reading, demonstrates understanding of the text and seeks to produce intonation patterns of real speech. Successfully avoids the "is-this-right?" question intonation in responses.

for 8 to 8,99 points
Shows some improvement in pronunciation and intonation during the semester. Usually repeats to confirm after pronunciation or stress has been corrected. Occasionally makes effort to avoid American or other non-Italian pronunciation.  When reading, demonstrates some understanding of the text but does not often produce intonation patterns of real speech. Occasionally manages to avoid the "is-this-right?" question intonation in responses.

for 7 to 7,99 points
Maintains the same pronunciation and intonation patterns demonstrated early in the semester. Only occasionally repeats to confirm after pronunciation or stress has been corrected. Makes some effort to avoid American pronunciation.  When reading, understanding of the text is often obscured by monotone or "reading voice." Sometimes produces intonation patterns of real speech. Frequently adopts the "is-this-right?" question intonation in responses.

 
The FINAL EXAMINATION: The Final Examination is a written exam. There is no "oral part" of the final exam.

For our Final Examination we have already requested the earliest possible times during the examination period. Typically our requests are honored; however, the University does not announce the schedule of uniform exam times until late in the semester. Therefore, DO NOT plan travel during the final examination period until that announcement has been made. We do not administer final examinations prior to the date on which the University schedules our final.

When it is announced, please write down the location of your final examination in more than one place.

The final exam will test mastery of the seven main communicative functions, all grammatical structures, vocabulary and cultural topics, including supplemental readings and video presentations, that have been covered during the semester.

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty:
Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For further information, please visit the Student Judicial Services web site at

http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/

If you do find it necessary to request a makeup on an examination, please remember that you must produce documentation of your emergency BEFORE your instructor can make any arrangements for you to take a makeup exam. Participation in weddings or family reunions, early departures for holiday travel, late returns to Austin following holiday travel, attending concerts or other cultural or entertainment events are NOT considered grounds for makeup examinations.


-----------

ITL 312L • primavera 2010 • il nostro programma (Syllabus)

    IV. In viaggio: Moving toward Fluency in Italian
    WB. Workbook/Lab Manual to Accompany In viaggio Part B
    RA. Radio Arlecchino, an Italian Grammar and Culture Podcast

mercoledì 20 gennaio.
Introduzione al corso; Presentazioni.

venerdì 22 gennaio. Last day of the official add/drop period; after this date, changes in registration require the approval of the department chair and usually the student’s dean.
Caro Diario di Nanni Moretti. Capitolo II. Lipari.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 25 gennaio.
Caro Diario di Nanni Moretti. Capitolo II. Salina.
RA. Puntata numero 11. Pronouns. "Adult Supervision Required".
WB. pp 5-6. I pronomi di oggetto diretto e indiretto.

mercoledì 27 gennaio.
Caro Diario di Nanni Moretti. Capitolo II. Stromboli.
RA. Puntata numero 12. Pronouns. "Just Look at Yourself".

venerdì 29 gennaio.
Caro Diario di Nanni Moretti. Capitolo II. Panarea; Alicudi
RA. Puntata numero 13. Pronouns. "The Joy of Stress".
__________________________________________________________

 
lunedì 1 febbraio.
RA. Puntate 14 e 15. Review. "The Holiday Special I & II".
Conversazione in classe: Scegli uno dei seguenti argomenti e parlane in classe. Prepara una Scheda di vocabolario.
(a) Racconta un tuo ricordo di un giorno di festa (holiday) memorabile.
(b) Con quale personaggio famoso, contemporaneo o storico, vorresti trascorrere un giorno di festa (holiday) particolare? Quale festa (holiday) sarebbe? Cosa fareste?

mercoledì 3 febbraio. Twelfth class day; this is the date the official enrollment count is taken. Last day an undergraduate student may add a class except for rare and extenuating circumstances. Last day to drop a class for a possible refund.
Continua la conversazione in classe: Scegli uno dei seguenti argomenti e parlane in classe. Prepara una Scheda di vocabolario.
(a) Racconta un tuo ricordo di un giorno di festa (holiday) memorabile.
(b) Con quale personaggio famoso, contemporaneo o storico, vorresti trascorrere un giorno di festa (holiday) particolare? Quale festa (holiday) sarebbe? Cosa fareste?
Ripasso pronomi.

venerdì 5 febbraio.
IV. Capitolo IV. p 99. pp 100-101. Situazioni. Bisogna festeggiare!
p 102. Vocabolario del tema. p 103. Ampliamento lessicale.
WB. p 20. Situazione. pp 20-21. Vocabolario del tema.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 8 febbraio.
IV. Capitolo IV. pp 103-104. Uso del vocabolario.
p 105. Nota culturale. “Non ci resta che oziare”.
WB. pp 1-2. Vocabolario del tema. pp 3-4. Punti chiave. Pratica delle forme verbali.

mercoledì 10 febbraio.
Quiz 1: Vocabolario del tema.
IV. Spiegazioni grammaticali (pagine verdi). pp 232-235. Piacere and similar verbs.
in Blackboard. Lettura. Leonardo Sciascia: "Il lungo viaggio".  Prima di leggere.
RA. Episode 16. “On the Red Carpet”.

venerdì 12 febbraio.
in Blackboard. Lettura. Leonardo Sciascia: "Il lungo viaggio".  Prima parte.
RA. Episode 17. “Casting Call and Scream Test”.
__________________________________________________________

 
lunedì 15 febbraio. Last day to drop a class without a possible academic penalty. Application deadline for study abroad programs for the summer session.
Oggi si consegna la prima versione del primo componimento.
in Blackboard. Lettura. Leonardo Sciascia: "Il lungo viaggio". Seconda parte.
RA. Episode 18. “The Catch of the Day”.

mercoledì 17 febbraio.
in Blackboard. Lettura. Leonardo Sciascia: "Il lungo viaggio". Dopo aver letto.
IV. Capitolo IV. pp 107-110. Come va con questo punto chiave?
WB. pp 4-5. Il punto chiave principale: Parlare dei gusti. Piacere e altri verbi simili. A; B.

venerdì 19 febbraio.
Quiz 2: Punto chiave G.
IV. Capitolo IV. pp 111-112. Angolo culturale. In viaggio per le isole italiane.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 22 febbraio.
IV. Capitolo IV. pp 114-115. Un artista siciliano: Giuseppe Tornatore.
WB. pp 23-24. Punti chiave.

mercoledì 24 febbraio.
Quiz 3. Geografia e cultura.
WB. Capitolo IV. pp 13-17. Lettura. La Sicilia: Luigi Pirandello.

venerdì 26 febbraio.
RIPASSO Capitolo IV.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 1 marzo. Application deadline for International Education Fee Scholarship (IEFS) for summer and fall study abroad programs.
RIPASSO Capitolo IV.
TEST Capitolo IV: parte comprensione auditiva.

mercoledì 3 marzo.
TEST Capitolo IV: parte scritta.

venerdì 5 marzo.
IV. Capitolo V. p 128. pp 129-131. Situazioni. Parliamo di politica!
pp 132-133. Vocabolario del tema. pp 133-134. Ampliamento lessicale.
WB. pp 44-45. Situazione; Vocabolario del tema.
__________________________________________________________

 
lunedì 8 marzo.
IV. Capitolo V. pp 134-135. Uso del vocabolario.
pp 136-137. Nota culturale. La Costituzione Italiana.
WB. pp 27-29. Vocabolario del tema. pp 29-30. Punti chiave. Pratica delle forme verbali.

mercoledì 10 marzo.
Quiz 4: Vocabolario del tema.
IV. Capitolo V. Spiegazioni grammaticali (pagine verdi) pp 235-239. Fare ipotesi.
pp 139-142. Come va con questo punto chiave?

venerdì 12 marzo.
Punto chiave I: fare ipotesi. Ripasso. WB. pp 30-32. Il punto chiave principale: Fare ipotesi.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 14 - venerdì 19 marzo. Vacanze primaverili.

lunedì 22 marzo.
IV. Capitolo V. pp 141-143. Angolo culturale. In viaggio per il Centro d’Italia.
WB. pp 47-48. Punti chiave.

mercoledì 24 marzo.
Quiz 5: Punto chiave I.
IV. Capitolo V. pp 147-149. Lettura. Clara Sereni: Casalinghitudine. A proposito della scrittrice; A proposito della lettura; Prima di leggere.

venerdì 26 marzo.
Oggi si consegna la prima versione del secondo componimento.
IV. Capitolo V. pp 149-151. Lettura. Clara Sereni: Casalinghitudine. 1. Zuppa di cipolle.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 29 marzo. Last day an undergraduate student may, with the dean’s approval, withdraw from the University or drop a class except for urgent and substantiated, nonacademic reasons.
Last day a student may change registration in a class to or from the pass/fail or credit/no credit basis.
IV. Capitolo V. pp 151-152. Lettura. Clara Sereni: Casalinghitudine. 2. Polpettone di ortiche. In Blackboard: Clara Sereni: Casalinghitudine. La festa dell'Unità.

mercoledì 31 marzo.
Quiz 6. Geografia e cultura.
IV. Capitolo V. pp 152-155. Lettura. Clara Sereni: Casalinghitudine. 3. Cassata; Amaro. pp 155-157. Dopo aver letto.

venerdì 2 aprile.
Conversazioni.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 5 aprile.
IV. Capitolo V. pp 144-145. Due artisti umbri: San Francesco e Santa Chiara.

mercoledì 7 aprile.
WB. Capitolo V. pp 39-43. Lettura. Il Lazio: Belli e Trilussa.

venerdì 9 aprile.
RIPASSO Capitolo V.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 12 aprile.
RIPASSO Capitolo V.
TEST Capitolo V: parte comprensione auditiva.

mercoledì 14 aprile.
TEST Capitolo V: parte scritta.

venerdì 16 -- venerdì 23 aprile: Esami orali.

venerdì 16 aprile.
IV. Capitolo VI. p 159. pp 160-162. Situazioni. Il futuro dei sei amici.
pp 163-164. Vocabolario del tema. p 164. Ampliamento lessicale.
WB. pp 71-72. Situazione; Vocabolario del tema.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 19 aprile.
IV. Capitolo VI. pp 165-167. Uso del vocabolario.
p 167. Nota culturale. La multietnicità italiana.
WB. pp 51-54. Vocabolario del tema. pp 54-55. Punti chiave. Pratica delle forme verbali.

mercoledì 21 aprile.
Quiz 7: Vocabolario del tema.
IV. Capitolo VI. pp 175-178. Angolo culturale. In viaggio per il Centro d’Italia.

venerdì 23 aprile.
IV. Capitolo VI. Spiegazioni grammaticali (pagine verdi) pp 239-247. Parlare del futuro.
RA. Episode 20. Global Thermogrammatical War.
__________________________________________________________

 
lunedì 26 aprile.
WB. pp 55-57. Il punto chiave principale: Parlare del futuro.
in Blackboard. Lettura. Carlo Castellaneta. "L'ultima mela". Prima di leggere.

mercoledì 28 aprile.
Oggi si consegna il terzo componimento.
IV. Capitolo VI. pp 169-171. Come va con questo punto chiave?
WB. pp 74-76. Punti chiave.
in Blackboard. Lettura. Carlo Castellaneta. "L'ultima mela". Prima parte.

venerdì 30 aprile.
Quiz 8: Punto chiave F.
in Blackboard. Lettura. Carlo Castellaneta. "L'ultima mela". Seconda parte; Dopo aver letto.
__________________________________________________________

lunedì 3 maggio.
IV. Capitolo VI. pp 178-179. Un artista toscano: Roberto Benigni.

mercoledì 5 maggio.
Quiz 9. Geografia e cultura.
WB. Capitolo VI. pp 67-70. Lettura. La Toscana: Dante Alighieri.

venerdì 7 maggio. Last class day.
RIPASSO.

=======================

mercoledì 12, giovedì 13, venerdì 14, sabato 15; lunedì 17, martedì 18 maggio. Spring semester final examinations.

N.B.: We have requested Wednesday 12 May from 9 am to noon as our Final Exam time. Typically our requests are honored, but the Registrar’s Office will not announce the official final exam time until late in the semester, so you must not schedule your departure from Austin until after the final examination period.

ITL 328 • Composition And Conversation

37045 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BEN 1.106
show description

ITL 328 - Composition and Conversation                                  Spring 2010

37045 – MWF  2:00-3:00 – BEN 1.106

Instructor: Antonella Del Fattore-Olson    Office: HRH # 2.106 B   Ph: 471-5706/5531
E-mail: ad.olson@mail.utexas.edu        Office hours: M & W 3-4, F 1-2 or by appt.

University Notices and Policies
University of Texas Honor Code
The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.
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Documented Disability Statement
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with dis¬abilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd
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Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence to Students
E-mail is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are responsible for reading your e-mail for university and course-related information and announcements. You are responsible to keep the university informed about chang¬es to your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently—I recommend daily, but at minimum twice a week—to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You can find UT Austin’s poli¬cies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php
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Religious Holy Days
By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a reli¬gious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.
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Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)
If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal
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Resources for Learning & Life at UT Austin
The University of Texas has numerous resources for students to provide assistance and support for your learning.
The UT Learning Center: http://www.utexas.edu/student/utlc/
Undergraduate Writing Center: http://uwc.utexas.edu/
Counseling & Mental Health Center: http://cmhc.utexas.edu/
Career Exploration Center: http://www.utexas.edu/student/careercenter/
Student Emergency Services: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/emergency/
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Emergency Evacuation Policy
Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made. Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:
Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.
If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week of class.
In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors.
Do not re-enter a building unless you’re given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office
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Q drop Policy
The State of Texas has enacted a law that limits the number of course drops for academic reasons to six (6). As stated in Senate Bill 1231:
“Beginning with the fall 2007 academic term, an institution of higher education may not permit an undergraduate stu¬dent a total of more than six dropped courses, including any course a transfer student has dropped at another institution of higher education, unless the student shows good cause for dropping more than that number.”
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ITL 328-Composition and Conversation                    Primavera 2010

Textbooks
Patota, Giuseppe. 2003. Grammatica di riferimento della lingua italiana per stranieri. Firenze: Le Monnier.
Folder of Xerox-copied material available at Jenn’s, 2200 Guadalupe
Baricco, Alessandro, Novecento. To be ordered online
(Barnes&Noble.com, or la_Feltrinelli.it, or Amazon.com)
Dizionario Harper Collins Sansoni, standard edition or equivalent

Useful websites
Garzanti Linguistica    http://www.garzantilinguistica.it
De Mauro, Grande Dizionario    http://old.demauroparavia.it
De Mauro, Dizionario dei sinonimi e contrari    http://www.demauroparavia.it
Eulogos    http://www.eulogos.it
Coniugatore di verbi    http://www.univ.trieste.it/~nirital/texel/coni/conihome.htm

Course description
Obiettivi - The goals of this course are to improve students’ skills in writing and speaking in Italian, as well as to increase their level of comprehension (both reading and listening). Furthermore, we aim at expanding the students’ knowledge of Italian culture. We will reach these goals by:
a.    Reading short stories and one monologue
b.    Reviewing grammar and the grammatical structures the reading material exhibits
c.    Listening to a variety of audio material and watching videos and two movies

Grading:
Quizzes (3)        15%        Compositions                    25%
Exam I        10%        Oral Reports and General Oral Performance    25%
Exam II        15%        Class Participation                    10%

Compositions/Compiti scritti-Tema~ Five compiti (short compositions) and one tema. (long composition). Students will write at home three compiti which are due on the days indicated on the syllabus and whose topic is given on the syllabus. Two compiti will be written in class. At the end of the semester, a longer paper is due, tema; students will have the chance to re-write it and its final grade will be the average between the first and second version. More specific instructions for each composition will be given as the course progresses.
Compiti and tema will be typed and double-spaced (except for the ones written in class).
Proper use of grammar as well as content will both greatly affect the composition grade. Please no e-mail submissions.


Oral Reports and General Oral Performance/Presentazioni orali e componente orale generale~ Students’ grade for this component will be based upon 1. the quality of their contribution to class discussion, their pronunciation, their ability in communicate and understanding, and 2. Two oral presentations: one presented individually, one in groups.
a.    Individual presentation: Each student will present in class a 5-10 min. oral report on a current event; no reading will be allowed, but visual aids is encouraged.
***Evaluation criteria: pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary.
Interesting/useful sites for the individual presentation:
http://www.mtv.it/tv/programmi/serie/lista_video.asp?id_prog=509
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/indexes/titles.php?id=512
Log on to Library PressDisplay with your EID here:
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/indexes/titles.php?id=512
b.    Group presentation: Each student is expected to speak for about 10 minutes. Therefore, a group of 2 students will give a 20 minute-long presentation, whereas a group of 5 will give a 50 minute-long presentation. No reading allowed! Students may use index cards if extremely necessary, but they must be prepared to act out their “role” as much as possible without reading.
Students are free to choose the “genre” of their presentation: a satire, a comedy, a drama, an interview, a movie, etc. (if you choose to videotape your presentation, remember that you must have at least a “live” introduction in class). The subject should be based upon the material we have studied in the course; students can focus on one reading/author/film or two, or combine all of them together since the subject must be related to Italian culture.
***Evaluation criteria: pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, creativity, fluency of expression.


Class Participation/Partecipazione in classe~ Regular attendance is required; more than three absences will lower the final grade; for the fourth absence, three points will be deducted from the final grade; four points for the fifth absence, and so on.
For each class, students should be ready to discuss the reading material and make personal comments on it. Students are encouraged to ask questions about the Italian culture.


Use of Blackboard in Class~ In this class, I use Blackboard—a Web-based course management system with password-protected access at http://courses.utexas.edu —to distribute course materials, to communicate and collaborate online, and to submit assign¬ments. You can find support in using Blackboard at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

Tutors~ Please refer to the French and Italian Department’s web page or visit the French and Italian Department’s Undergraduate Office in HRH http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/frenchitalian/student-resources/Tutors--Translators.php

Be aware that tutors ARE NOT ALLOWED to do homework for you rather give you individual attention in mastering complex grammatical structures and oral skills. Moreover, if the professor deems--due to a discrepancy with your oral and written performance in class--that your homework has been done with the help of a computer-translation-program or a tutor, you will receive a 'no-grade' for that paper; the 'no-grade' will neither lower nor raise your overall grade average. Please read carefully the policy on
Scholastic Dishonesty~ Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For further information, please visit http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php
This site offers excellent resources on how to cite sources and paraphrase. Copying materials from other people or from sources on the Internet, for example, or having your work edited by somebody else, constitutes a fraudulent submission. Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student’s own work and will acknowledge others’ work as appropriate (e.g., citing sources).
        

IL CIRCOLO ITALIANO
Throughout the semester, the Italian Club shows six Italian movies (Adria Frizzi) and offers the Tavola Italiana, weekly meetings where students can practice Italian in an informal setting (Antonella Olson). The Tavola meets every Friday, 3:30-4:30, at the Cactus Café (Texas Union). Additional events sponsored by the Italian Club will be announced in class.


ROME STUDY PROGRAM - DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH AND ITALIAN
The Rome Study Program gives students of all majors the opportunity to spend six weeks in Rome, Italy during the first summer session, earn three or six credit hours and visit some of the most beautiful Italian sites on weekends. Italian families host students providing an in-depth experience of Italian life-style and language. Please visit our website: http://sites.google.com/site/romestudyprogram/Home
and/or contact Program Director: Antonella D. Olson, HRH # 2.106 B,   # 471-5706/5531, ad.olson@mail.utexas.edu
        
 

SYLLABUS –PROGRAMMA

Nota bene!~ L’analisi delle regole della grammatica e della sintassi che si farà in questo corso è un ripasso di ciò che si è studiato nei primi due anni o nell’anno intensivo di italiano. Il materiale presentato dalle letture deve essere utilizzato sia come mezzo di discussione di tutte le regole grammaticali che come fonte di conversazione. La partecipazione costante alle lezioni è un fattore determinante per il successo individuale e collettivo.

Gr.:  = grammatica         L.: = letture                 N.: = Novecento
m.  = metà della pagina        in. = inizio della pagina

GENNAIO
mercoledì 20    Introduzione al corso. Conversazione

venerdì 22 *    Gr.: Cap. 1, parte 1, Suoni e lettere dell’italiano, pp. 1-14. L.: Viva l’Italia
            *  last day add/drop
________________________________________________________________________________

lunedì 25        Gr.: Cap. 1, parte 1, Suoni e lettere dell’italiano, pp. 21-39. L.: Viva l’Italia

mercoledì 27        Gr.: Cap. 1, parte 2, Il nome, pp. 42-61 (m.). L.: Viva l’Italia

venerdì 29        Gr.: Cap. 2, parte 2, L’articolo e la preposizione, pp. 70-75 (m.).
COMPITO SCRITTO # 1:
L’artista che preferisci  (no biografie, solo commenti personali;
1 1/2 page, typed, double spaced)
________________________________________________________________________________

FEBBRAIO
lunedì  1        Gr.: Cap. 2, parte 2, L’articolo e la preposizione, pp. 75-81. L.: Tutto merito
 delle donne se siamo diventati pacifisti

mercoledì  3 *    Gr.: Cap. 2, parte 2, L’articolo e la preposizione, pp. 81-90. L.: Tutto merito delle donne se siamo diventati pacifisti
* last day to drop for possible refund

venerdì 5         Gr.: Cap. 3, parte 2, L’aggettivo, pp. 91-98
__________________________________________________________________________________

lunedì 8        Gr.: Cap. 3, parte 2, L’aggettivo, pp. 91-98.
L.: Introduzione a Donna di Porto Pim e ascolto

mercoledì 10        Gr.: Cap. 3, parte 2, L’aggettivo, pp. 98-105 (m.)
L.: Donna di Porto Pim: lingua e grammatica
    
venerdì 12        Gr.: Cap. 3, parte 2, L’aggettivo, pp. 105-114. QUIZ 1
________________________________________________________________________________

lunedì  15 *        L.: finire di leggere Donna di Porto Pim: commento orale
 L.: “Post Scriptum”: ascolto e commento orale
* last day to drop without possible academic penalty

mercoledì 17        IN CLASSE: COMPITO SCRITTO # 2

venerdì 19        Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 115-124 (m.).
Introduzione a Novecento. L.: N.: leggere p. 11-21 (m.)
__________________________________________________________________________________

lunedì 22        Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 124-131. L.: N.: leggere p. 21-33
    
mercoledì 24        Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 132-133. RIPASSO.
L.: N.: leggere p. 34-44 (in.)    
            
venerdì 26        ESAME 1
__________________________________________________________________________________

MARZO
March 1-Application deadline for IEFS for summer and fall study abroad programs

*Film~ La leggenda del pianista sull’oceano (G. Tornatore): da vedere entro martedì 9 marzo

lunedì 1        Gr.: Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 133-139.
L.: Commento alla prima parte di Novecento.
COMPITO SCRITTO # 3:
Il tuo nome: qual è la sua storia? (1 ½ page, typed, double spaced)
                
mercoledì 3        Gr.: Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 139-145.
L.: N.: leggere pp. 44-51 (m.)
        
venerdì 5    Gr.: Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 145-148. QUIZ 2

lunedì 8        L.: N.: leggere pp. 51- 62

mercoledì 10        Gr.: L.: Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 149-154 (in.).
L.: Commento orale a Novecento e al film La leggenda del pianista sull’oceano
                    
venerdì 12    Ripasso. Conversazione
__________________________________________________________________________________

15 - 20    SPRING BREAK
__________________________________________________________________________________

lunedì 22        Gr.: Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 154-157.
L.: Attività di gruppo su Novecento
            
mercoledì 24        Gr.: Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 163-173.
COMPITO SCRITTO # 4:  Inventa una tua fine personale a Novecento. e
 fa un commento critico al monologo (2 pages, typed, double-spaced)

venerdì 26        Gr.: Cap. 4, parte 2, Il verbo e i suoi usi, pp. 174-182 (in.). Ripasso
__________________________________________________________________________________

lunedì 29 *        Ripasso. QUIZ 3
•    last day undergraduates may with dean's approval drop and change
to or from pass/fail
            
mercoledì 31        PRESENTAZIONI ORALI 1
APRILE
venerdì 2        PRESENTAZIONI ORALI 1
________________________________________________________________________________    

*Film~ Mio fratello è figlio unico (D. Lucchetti): da vedere entro lunedì 19 aprile

lunedì 5        PRESENTAZIONI ORALI 1
                                      
mercoledì 7        Descrizione del film Mio fratello è figlio unico e della sua musica
    
venerdì 9        Ripasso. Domande degli studenti sulla grammatica
    

April 14-16, 19-23: Academic advising for the summer session and the fall semester

lunedì 12        ESAME 2    
                           
mercoledì 14        L.: La latteria
        
venerdì 16        L.: La latteria                
________________________________________________________________________________

April 19-30: Registration for the summer session and the fall semester

lunedì 19        IN CLASSE: COMPITO SCRITTO # 5        
                
mercoledì 21        Commento al film. Domande degli studenti sulla grammatica
                                        
venerdì 23        Commento al film. Domande degli studenti sulla grammatica
__________________________________________________________________________________    

lunedì 26        TEMA – Versione A. Attività culturali
                    
mercoledì 28        Attività culturali
        
venerdì 30        Preparazione per la presentazione. Conversazione
__________________________________________________________________________________    
MAGGIO

lunedì 3        PRESENTAZIONE DI GRUPPO
                    
mercoledì 5        PRESENTAZIONE DI GRUPPO
                                 
venerdì 7        TEMA - Versione B. PRESENTAZIONE DI GRUPPO
__________________________________________________________________________________
    
ITL 328 - Composition and Conversation            Spring 2010

Indice delle Letture

“Viva l’Italia”  Francesco De Gregori  (In giro per la letteratura)

“Tutto merito delle donne se siamo diventati pacifisti”  Francesco Alberoni
(In giro per la letteratura)

“Donna di Porto Pim”, “Post Scriptum”  Antonio Tabucchi

Novecento  Alessandro Baricco

“La latteria”  Paolo Rossi (In giro per la letteratura)



Movies
These movies will be watched outside of class:

--La leggenda del pianista sull’oceano (Giuseppe Tornatore)

--Mio fratello è figlio unico  (Daniele Luchetti)

--Uno dei film presentati da IL CIRCOLO ITALIANO



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