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Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, Chair 305 E. 23rd Street • CLA 3.306 • A3100 • Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-232-1595

Paul C. Adams

Professor Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Associate Professor - Graduate Advisor
Paul C. Adams

Contact

Biography

Paul Adams received his Bachelor of Environmental Design from the University of Colorado-Boulder in 1984 (Special Honors), and his MS and Ph.D. in geography from University of Wisconsin-Madison (1990, 1993). Since 2003 he has been Director of the Urban Studies Program and Chair of the Communication Geography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. He was a Fulbright Research Fellow at the University of Bergen, Norway, in fall of 2010. He was a visiting Fulbright Fellow and Thomas O. Enders Fellow at McGill University and University of Montreal, Quebec, in fall semester, 2001. 

Adams regularly teaches GRG305, This Human World (introductory human geography) and URB301, Introduction to Urban Studies, as well as URB315, Urban Studies Research Methods and GRG390L, Research in Geography. He has also taught Geographies of the Information Society, Statistics for Policy Design, and graduate seminars addressing geopolitics and representation.

Adams applies various geographical lenses to communication, addressing communication infrastructure, communication as a social process, and communication as an element of individual experience.  

Publications

Adams, P.C. and Gynnild, A. 2013. “Communicating Environmental Messages in Online Media: The Role of Place” Environmental Communication 7 (1): 113-130.

Gynnild, A. and Adams, P.C., 2013. “Animation, Documentary or Interactive Gaming? Exploring Communicative Aspects of Environmental Messaging Online,” International Symposium on Online Journalism 3 (1): 39-60.

Adams, P.C. 2012. “Trajectories of the Nobel Peace Prize” Geopolitics 17 (3): 553-577.

Adams, P.C. and Jansson, A. 2012.“Communication Geography: A Bridge between Disciplines” Communication Theory 22: 298-317.

Adams, P.C. 2012. “Multilayered Regionalization in Northern Europe” GeoJournal 77: 293-313.

Adams, P.C. 2011. A Taxonomy for Communication Geography. Progress in Human Geography 35 (1): 37-57. Find it on SagePub

Adams, P.C.  2010. Networks of Early Writing. Historical Geography 38: 70-89. 

Adams, P.C. 2009. Geographies of Media and Communication: A Critical Introduction. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. Find it on UT WorldCat

Adams, P.C. 2007. Atlantic Reverberations: French Representations of an American Election. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Press.   Find it on UT WorldCat

Adams, P.C. 2007. Technological Change. Guest editor of special issue of Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1).

Adams, P.C. 2005. The Boundless Self: Communication in Physical and Virtual Spaces. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press. Find it on UT WorldCat

Adams, P.C. 2004. The September 11 Attacks as Viewed from Quebec: The Small-Nation Myth in Geopolitical Discourse. Political Geography 23 (6), 765-795.

Adams, P.C. and Ghose, R. 2003. India.com: the Construction of a Space Between. Progress in Human Geography 27 (4), 414-437. Find it on SagePub

Adams, P.C., Hoelscher, S. and Till, K., editors. 2001. Textures of Place. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Find it on UT WorldCat

 

Interests

Place Images in the Media, Technologically-Mediated Gathering, Topologies of Communication, Geopolitical Discourses, Formation of Subjectivity

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37530-37535 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JES A121A
show description

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84210 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 0.112
show description

GRG f305 THIS HUMAN WORLD: INTRO TO GRG

Introductory survey of human geography, including human-environment relations, cultural patterns and processes, and geography's relation to other fields of study.

May be counted toward the global cultures flag requirement.

Additional hour(s) to be arranged.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

38040 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 1.108
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An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C-; Mathematics 316 or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305 with a grade of at least C-; and Urban Studies 301.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37725-37780 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WCH 1.120
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An introduction to human geography, includes a required weekly discussion section.

GRG 356T • Geography Of Media

37857 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 1.102
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A wide-ranging exploration of the ways in which communication media can be understood through geographical ways of knowing.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

37750 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm CLA 0.128
show description

Meets MWF 2:00-3:00

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37295-37350 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WCH 1.120
show description

DESCRIPTION

Geography means learning where things are but more importantly it means understanding how and why things got to be where they are. To address these questions goes far beyond simply memorizing place names. It demands that we inquire deeply into the processes behind spatial patterns, including elements of religion, language, politics, and the built environment. Geographical processes also involve the inherent opportunities and constraints offered by the natural environment. This course therefore focuses on the patterns and flows that make culture spatial, while a secondary focus is human-environment interactions. In regard to both foci we take the time to think intensely about what is involved in responsible citizenship.

Students will learn how to think spatially, including the ability to recognize spatial processes and patterns, and the various factors affecting the connections between spatial processes and patterns.

The course includes a 90 minute lecture twice a week and a 1-hour discussion section once a week.

 

TEXTBOOK

 •The Human Mosaic, 11th edition (by Domosh, Neumann, Price and Jordan-Bychkov)

 •Online Supplements at: http://bcs.whfreeman.com/jordan11e/

 •Student Atlas of World Geography, 6th or 7th edition (by John Allen)

 

GRADING:

PARTICIPATION

Students will receive credit for participating in discussions and in-class activities, as well as for quizzes, special campus events and (randomly sampled) attendance.

PROJECTS

Three projects prompt a creative response to issues, ideas and techniques presented in the class.

EXAMS

The three exams are mostly multiple choice format with a few short answer questions.

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84685 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm GRG 102
show description

DESCRIPTION

We all know that geography means learning where things are but more importantly it means understanding how things got where they are, and why they are there. Beyond simply memorizing place names we need to inquire deeply into the processes behind spatial patterns, into roots that include religion, language, politics, and the built environment. Geographical processes also reflect and modify the inherent opportunities and constraints offered by the natural environment. This course therefore focuses on the patterns and flows that make culture spatial, while a secondary focus is human-environment interactions. In regard to both foci we take the time to think intensely about what is involved in responsible citizenship.

 

TEXTBOOK

  • The Human Mosaic, 11th edition (by Domosh, Neumann, Price and Jordan-Bychkov)
  • Online Supplements at: http://bcs.whfreeman.com/jordan11e/
  • Student Atlas of World Geography, 6th edition (by John Allen)

 

GRADING:

PARTICIPATION

This portion of the grade includes a mix of the following: contribution to discussions, in-class activities, quizzes, special events on campus and randomly sampled attendance. 30 pts.

EXAMS

 Exams are mostly multiple choice format with a few short answer questions. 180 pts.

  • Exam 1: 50 pts. (Ch. 1-3 + mapping)
  • Exam 2: 50 pts. (Ch. 4-7)
  • Final Exam: 80 pts. (cumulative)

PROJECTS

This component of the grade see how well you can apply ideas introduced in the lecture through self-directed mapping, research, group problem solving and analytical writing. 90 pts.

  • Project 1: 25 pts.
  • Project 2: 40 pts.
  • Project 3: 25 pts.

300 pts. total

GRG 390L • Research In Geography

37465 • Spring 2012
Meets M 500pm-800pm GRG 408
show description

Builds on topics explored in Geography 390K by focusing on epistemology and research in the field of geography. Students develop plans for research and write a research proposal. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Required of all first-year graduate students in geography. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Geography 390K.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

37600 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 3.116
show description

An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37240-37280 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 307C • Introduction To Urban Studies

37305 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am GRG 102
(also listed as URB 301 )
show description

URB 301 • Introduction To Urban Studies

37635 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am GRG 102
(also listed as GRG 307C )
show description

GRG F305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84660 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm GRG 102
show description

We all know that geography means learning where things are but more importantly it means understanding how things got where they are, and why they are there. Beyond simply memorizing place names we need to inquire deeply into the processes behind spatial patterns, into roots that include religion, language, politics, and the built environment. Geographical processes also reflect and modify the inherent opportunities and constraints offered by the natural environment. This course therefore focuses on the patterns and flows that make culture spatial, while a secondary focus is human-environment interactions. In regard to both foci we take the time to think intensely about what is involved in responsible citizenship.

GRG 390L • Research In Geography

37685 • Spring 2011
Meets T 500pm-800pm GRG 408
show description

Research in Geography is designed as the second course in a two-course sequence preparing graduate students to conduct scholarly research.  The course addresses questions of geographical epistemology, ontology, and methodology, as well as providing a forum for the discussion of academic life, competitiveness and professionalism.  The course will include guest presentations from various faculty on the subject of research with attention to grant-writing, conducting fieldwork, analyzing data, utilizing theoretical frameworks, publishing and getting hired.

URB 315 • Urban Studies Research Methods

37815 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 1.126
show description

Urban Studies Research methods is a required core course for Urban Studies majors.  Students develop a research question of a broad and general nature then design their own research projects that will help answer that research question in various ways.  These short, independent, field-based projects develop abilities in applying the following methodologies: structured observation, surveys, interviews, and statistical analysis of secondary data.  Prerequisite: an introductory course in statistical methods, either SSC 305 or M316 with a grade of C- or better.

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84195 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am GRG 102
show description

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 396T • Geographies Of Communication

37550 • Spring 2010
Meets M 400pm-700pm GRG 408
show description
  • Communication and Geography intersect in complex ways.
  • Places and spaces are part of the contents of communications.
  • Places and spaces also form diverse contexts for communication.
  • The course will chart a path across the space defined by the two dichotomies: space vs place and content vs context.

Grading
In-class presentations 50 points (Everyone will pick a day and lead the discussion that day, following
the guidelines below.)
Research paper draft 50 points
Due April 19
Research paper 100 points
____________________________________________
Total 200 points

Books
• Adams. Geographies of Media and Communication. Wiley-Blackwell.
• McEwan & Blunt (MB). Postcolonial Geographies. Continuum.
• Latour. Reassembling the Social. Oxford U. Press.
• Adams, Hoelscher & Till (AHT). Textures of Place. U. of Minnesota Press.

In-class presentation guidelines:
Presentations should include:
◊ A summary of the main ideas in the readings for that week, taken as a
whole. This should be organized into key terms and concepts, each with
one or more supplementary terms and/or concepts. This is not the place
to ask questions; it is the place to collect and paraphrase the main
objectives, arguments, and assumptions of the entire set of readings.
Print these points in outline format for everyone in the class.
◊ A critical introduction to each of the readings for that week, taken
individually. This is the place to discuss the organization of arguments by
particular authors--what comes first, what comes last, how are arguments
structured and what counts for evidence? Are you convinced or are there
problems with their arguments?
◊ Comparison and contrast of the differences between authors (if more than
one author is included that week). In some cases you may notice tensions
between the perspectives of the authors. Deal with these tensions at this
point in your presentation
◊ Questions for class discussion: at least 4 fertile questions the class can
discuss, relating to the readings and (optimally) with some visual
materials or artifacts (like ads, news photos, or video clips) that you bring
to class. Remember, this presentation counts for 25% of your total grade!

URB 315W • Urban Studies Research Meths-W

37670 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GRG 424
show description

See PDF

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37645-37700 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 800-930 JGB 2.324
show description

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

84075 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 GRG 102
show description

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 310C • Spatial Data And Analysis

84077 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 GRG 102
show description

This is an entry level course that will prepare the student for higher level courses in geographic methods and techniques. The course content consists of a series of modules designed to cover topics common to courses in Cartography, Geographic Information Science, Field Techniques, and Remote Sensing of the Environment.

We will examine quantitative and qualitative methods of sampling, representing, classifying, and analyzing geographic phenomena. We will examine conceptions of temporal and spatial scale, location, distance and direction, and examine a broad range of geographic research methods. Specific topics will include earth shape, gravitational and magnetic fields, map projections, coordinate systems, surveying and navigation, measurements and errors, spatial statistics, and spatial analysis.

Classes will consist of lectures and discussions of the readings. Students will complete ten exercises, a mid-term examination and a final examination.

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