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Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, Chair 305 E. 23rd Street • CLA 3.306 • A3100 • Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-232-1595

Eugenio Arima

Professor Ph.D., Michigan State University

Assistant Professor
Eugenio Arima

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Biography

Dr. Arima received his bachelor degree in agricultural sciences from the University of Brasilia, Brazil, his masters in agricultural economics from PennState University and PhD in geography from Michigan State University.

Dr Arima research interest lies under the broad theme of land cover and land use change (LUCC). He is particularly interested in modeling how LUCC manifests spatially using a combination of quantitative tools such as econometrics, geographic information systems, computer simulations, and remote sensing. He uses behavioral models (e.g. microeconomic models) to describe the motivations that drive humans to act upon and transform landscapes. He recognizes though the limits of quantitative methods and theory. Hence he spends a considerable amount of time conducting field work and interviewing colonists, farmers, loggers and politicians in the Amazon basin during summer breaks. This has provided him with insights into the influence of political economy on environmental change processes and to the importance of understanding the role of multiple agents and their social-political relations in transforming landscapes. Dr. Arima strongly supports multidisciplinary work and collaborates extensively with economists, sociologists, biologists and ecologists. Currently, he is part of two collaborative researches. The first, supported by NASA, investigates the role of climate change, land use, and mitigation efforts in shifting fire regimes in the United States, Australia, and the Brazilian Amazon. The second project supported by NSF examines forest fragmentation processes that result from roads built by private agents such as loggers, colonists, and miners.

Selected Publications

Arima, E., Walker, R., Souza Jr, C., Pereira, R., & Canto, O. (2013). Spontaneous colonization and forest fragmentation in the Central Amazon basin. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 103(3), 1485-1501. doi: 10.1080/00045608.2013.834231

Arima, E., Walker, R., & Vergara, D. (2013). Assessing the performance of linear feature models: an approach to computation inference. Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing, 79(9), 847-855. 

Arima, E. Y., P. Richards, R. T. Walker M. Caldas. 2011. Statistical confirmation of indirect land use change in the Brazilian Amazon. Environmental Research Letters 6 (2011) 024010 doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/2/024010.

Walker, R., C. Simmons, S. Aldrich, S. Perz, E. Arima, M. Caldas. 2011. The Amazonian theater of cruelty. Association of American Geographers 101(5): 1156-1170.

Walker, R., N. Moore, E. Arima, S. Perz, C. Simmons, M. Caldas, D. Vergara, C. Bohrer. 2009. Protecting the Amazon with Protected Areas. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106(26): 10582-10586.

Arima, E. Y., Walker, R. T., Sales, M., Souza Jr., Perz, S. G. 2008. The fragmentation of space in the Amazon basin: emergent road networks. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 74(6): 699-709.

Arima, E., C. S. Simmons, R. Walker, and M. A. Cochrane. 2007. Fire in the Brazilian Amazon: a spatially explicit model for policy impact analysis. Journal of Regional Sciences 47 (3):541-567.

Moore, N., E. Arima, R. Walker, and R. R. Silva. 2007. Uncertainty and the changing hydroclimatology of the Amazon. Geophysical Research Letters 34 (L14707):doi:10.1029/2007GL030157.

Interests

Human-environment interactions, land change science, GIS/Science, applied quantitative methods, Latin America.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

36740-36755 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.128
show description

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 470C • Advanced Geographic Info Sys

37665 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 3.102
show description

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling capabilities have been used to inform and support decision making in the management of watersheds and parks, in the design of emergency evacuation plans, among others. Advanced GIS will cover a wide range of modeling applications using rasters, including watershed drainage analysis, ecological corridors and least cost path analysis. Students will also be introduced to analytical tools such as spatial data interpolation techniques, fuzzy set analysis, and location/allocation analysis. Hands-on experience will be provided through weekly labs and final project

GRG 396T • Regression Analysis In Geog

37735 • Fall 2014
Meets M 400pm-700pm CLA 1.102
show description

This course will overview a wide range of statistical regression techniques applied to the social sciences and spatial contexts, including ordinary least squares, limited dependent variable models, and spatial regression models. The goal of the course is to equip geography masters and PhD students with sufficient knowledge of regression analysis to a) employ those methods in their own research, b) help them understand the empirical literature they read, and c) provide a basis for more advanced methods. Emphasis will be placed on the meaning of the assumptions needed to obtain consistent and/or unbiased estimators and cases when those assumptions may be violated. Although knowledge of college algebra and basic probability and statistics is required, the course will approach regression analysis empirically, with substantial time devoted to lab exercises, implementation of models, and interpretation of results, particularly in the context of causality and partial effects measurement.

 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37890-37905 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.128
show description

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 396T • Land Change Science

37990 • Fall 2013
Meets T 400pm-700pm CLA 4.106
show description

This graduate level course surveys the current and past literature in the field of land change science. The course is divided into five major parts:  part I) addresses the emergence of land change science as a fundamental component of environmental research; II) investigates the causes and drivers of land change and its theoretical foundations across certain social sciences’ disciplines; III) provides a glimpse of the land cover monitoring & characterization and modeling literature; IV) looks into the synergies and impacts of land change on other systems. Finally, part V) investigates the recent literature on forest transition, indirect land change, and land sharing/sparing and future directions of the field.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37535-37550 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.128
show description

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 470C • Advanced Geographic Info Sys

37565-37570 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm CLA 1.102
show description

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling capabilities have been used to inform and support decision making in the management of watersheds and parks, in the design of emergency evacuation plans, among others. This course will cover a wide range of modeling applications using rasters, including surface hydrologic analysis, viewshed, least cost path and corridor analysis, and fuzzy set multicriteria evaluation. Students will also be introduced to analytical tools such as spatial data interpolation techniques, error assessment, and spatial pattern statistics. Hands-on experience will be provided through weekly labs and final project. This course will expand and refine GIS concepts, applications, algorithms, and analysis beyond the introductory GIS course.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37440-37455 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm GRG 102
show description

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 396T • Land Change Science

37545 • Fall 2012
Meets T 400pm-700pm GRG 408
show description

This graduate level course surveys the current and past literature in the field of land change science. The course is divided into five major parts:  part I) addresses the emergence of land change science as a fundamental component of environmental research; II) investigates the causes and drivers of land change and its theoretical foundations across certain social sciences’ disciplines; III) provides a glimpse of the land cover monitoring & characterization and modeling literature; IV) looks into the synergies and impacts of land change on other systems. Finally, part V) investigates the recent literature on forest transition, indirect land change, and land sharing/sparing and future directions of the field.

GRG 356T • Digital Terrain Modeling

37365 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GRG 206
show description

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling capabilities have been used to inform and support decision making in the management of watersheds and parks, in the design of emergency evacuation plans, among others. This course will cover a wide range of modeling applications using rasters, including surface hydrologic analysis, viewshed, least cost path and corridor analysis, and fuzzy set multicriteria evaluation. Students will also be introduced to analytical tools such as spatial data interpolation techniques, error assessment, and spatial pattern statistics. Hands-on experience will be provided through weekly labs and final project. This course will expand and refine GIS concepts, applications, algorithms, and analysis beyond the introductory GIS course.

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37390-37405 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GRG 102
show description

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

GRG 360G • Envir Geographic Info Systems

37425 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm GRG 102
show description

This course introduces basic concepts underlying geographic information systems and science (GIS), including related or integrated technologies and applications such as global positioning systems (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. It combines an overview of the general principles of GIS with a theoretical treatment of the nature and issues associated with the use of spatial environmental information. Although the course has a laboratory component that introduces students to the most commonly used GIS software package, the focus is on the “science behind the software” (eg, types and implications of functions and analysis, rather than just how to do the analysis).

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