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Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, Chair 305 E. 23rd Street • CLA 3.306 • A3100 • Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-232-1595

Gregory W. Knapp

Professor Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison

Associate Professor - Chair of the Undergraduate Committee
Gregory W. Knapp

Contact

  • Phone: 512.232.1588
  • Office: CLA 3.712
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: Tuesday 11-12 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: A3100

Biography

Prof. Knapp performs research on traditional and modernizing agriculture, water, adaptation to environmental change, and ethnic and cultural geography in relationship with modernization.  He has written or edited nine books and monographs, including a standard textbook on South America and the edited volume, Latin America in the 21st Century.  He has served as Executive Director of the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers, and is currently involved with the Food and Farming Research Initiative of the Department of Geography and the Environment.  His students have performed research on such topics as urban ethnicity, tourism, urban agriculture and foodways, water management, ranching, and nontradtional exports.  He has taught in five UT summer study abroad programs, in Argentina and Europe, in addition to teaching large undergraduate and graduate courses on Latin America, cultural and political ecology, and sustainable development.

Selected Publications

Knapp, G. 2012. "Geography: Western South America," pp 162-177 in Handbook of Latin American Studies: No. 67: Social Sciences, edited by Tracy North and Katherine D. McCann, University of Texas Press.

Knapp, G. 2011. “Ethnic Mapping” in Mapping Latin America: Space and Society, 1492-2000, edited by Jordana Dym and Karl Offen, University of Chicago Press.

Knapp, G. 2010. "The Andes: Personal Reflections on Cultural Change, 1977-2010," Journal of Cultural Geography 27:307-316

Knapp, G. 2007. The Legacy of European Colonialism. In T. Veblen, K. Young & A. Ome (Eds.), The Physical Geography of South America (pp.279-288). Oxford University Press.

Knapp, G. 2007.  “Human Ecology,” Encyclopedia of Environment and Society, edited by Paul Robbins. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, California.

Knapp, G. & Doolittle, W.E. 2005. Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov, 1938-2003. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 95(2), 462-470.

Knapp, G. and Peter Herlihy (eds.) 2003. Participatory Mapping of Indigenous Lands in Latin America, special issue of Human Organization. Volume 62, number 4.

Knapp, G. (ed.) 2002. Latin America in the Twenty-First Century: Challenges and Solutions. Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers and University of Texas Press.

Knapp, G. and Cesar Caviedes. 1995 South America. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.

Knapp, G. 1992 Riego Precolonial y Tradicional en la Sierra Norte del Ecuador. Hombre y Ambiente 22 (special issue devoted to this one work). Quito: Ediciones Abya Yala. < ;script src="http://www.utexas.edu/cola/_library/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/themes/advanced/langs/en.js" type="text/javascript"> p>

Knapp, G. 1991 Andean Ecology: Adaptive Dynamics in Ecuador. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.

Knapp, G. 1991 Geografia Quichua de la Sierra del Ecuador. Quito: Ediciones Abya Yala.

Knapp, G. 1988 Ecologia Cultural Prehispanica del Ecuador. Quito: Banco Central del Ecuador.

Knapp, G. N. Allan and C. Stadel (eds.). 1988. Human Impact on Mountains. Totowa, New Jersey: Rowman and Littlefield.

NIH Biosketch

Interests

Cultural and Political Ecology, Food and Farming, Latin America (especially Andes)

GRG F323K • Geography Of So America-Arg

84215 • Summer 2014
Meets
(also listed as LAS F330 )
show description

This course examines issues of cultural landscapes, society, and sustainable development in South America. For summer 2014, the course takes full advantage of its location in Buenos Aires, Argentina.  Buenos Aires is South America's second largest city, with about 13 million people in the metropolitan area; it is located at the edge of the subtropical, agricultural Pampa.  Buenos Aires has attracted a large number of immigrants from all over the country and a substantial number from the rest of South America, Europe, and Asia. Students will examine selected issues of the geography of this urban landscape through readings, discussions, and field trips.

 

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

37780 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.128
(also listed as LAS 319 )
show description

This course is a general introduction to the environmental, cultural, economic and political geography of Latin America and the Caribbean. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can also benefit from the exploration of such topics as environmental hazards, indigenous lifeways and resource management, globalization and modernization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  

The course examines major environmental zones as defined by geomorphology, climate, and biogeography, in terms of risks and hazards, resources, and human impacts. Students also study social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods, social structures, and cultures, including early migrants to the Americas, the rise of chiefdoms and indigenous civilizations including Aztec and Inca, the European conquest and spread of Iberian colonial culture and economic relationships, and the inception and spread of modernization as related to neoliberal and alternative forms of development including discourses of sustainability in contemporary Latin America. Relationships between regional, national, and global communities are studied by means of a commodity chain project resulting in a written paper.  A range of environmental and social science theories and methods are discussed, including plate tectonics, basic climate models, hazards research, circumscription theory, and theories of modernization, dependency, and development. Communication skills are developed through graphical and essay questions on quizzes and exams, the written course project, and discussion in lectures and optional discussion sections.

The class serves as a preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for teaching. This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management (Sustainability), and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for the Global Studies, Environment, and/or the Social Entrepreneurship & Non-profits BDPs). 

 

GRG 331K • Cultural Ecology

37790 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 1.102
(also listed as ANT 324L )
show description

This course examines the long-term human trajectory in gaining control over resources, impacting the environment, and transforming planet earth into a meaningful human home. This trajectory has been related to long-term changes in human integration (reciprocity, trade, and redistribution) at a variety of scales, culminating in recent globalization. These changes have been associated with great achievements in quality of life for some, but with attendant problems of violence, impoverishment, and environmental impacts including, in some extreme cases, collapse. These challenges implicate both culture (learned habitual behavior, concepts, and associated objects and landscapes) and ethics (socially oriented decisions) as they promote or fail to promote resilience and adaptation with respect for human rights.

The course will discuss major transformations: the origins of the human species, the domestication of plants and animals, the rise of agricultural societies and urban civilizations, global mercantile colonialism, and modernization and urbanization. Attention will be paid to the theories and works of geographers, ecological anthropologists, environmental historians, and others. Lectures and student-proctored discussions examine selected strategies employed by humans to cope with the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities presented by different natural environments, with special attention to foraging, food, and farming. The course will also provide an introduction to ethical and policy issues surrounding sustainable development and alternative futures. Grading is based on attendance and participation, numerous writing assignments, oral presentations, and proctoring.

The course has a Writing Flag and an Ethics and Leadership Flag. It can be used to meet the core requirements for the Sustainability (Environmental Resource Management) and Cultural Geography tracks in the Geography major, and the upper division course requirements in the Anthropology major. It also can be used for the International Relations and Global Studies Major. 

GRG 395D • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

37970 • Fall 2013
Meets M 700pm-1000pm CLA 2.606
(also listed as LAS 388 )
show description

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, and cultural geography. The course will address a range of issues of sustainable development, cultural and political ecology, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, conservation strategies, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. Topics and readings are developed in part on the basis of input from students.

Prerequisites:

Graduate standing and some knowledge of rural Latin America or the Caribbean. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable but not necessary. THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED; YOU MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION TO REGISTER. To obtain permission, email the instructor with a brief description of your research area and Latin American academic and field experience.

GRG S331K • Cultural Ecology

84600 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm CLA 1.102
(also listed as ANT S324L )
show description

This course examines the long term human trajectory in progressively gaining control over resources and transforming planet earth into a meaningful human home. There will be special attention to the theories and works of geographers, ecological anthropologists, and environmental historians.  Lectures and student-proctored discussions examine selected strategies employed by humans to cope with the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities presented by different natural environments, with special attention to foraging and farming.  The course will also provide an introduction to ethical and policy issues surrounding sustainable development and alternative futures.  Grading is based on attendance and participation, numerous writing assignments, oral presentations, and proctoring.

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

37460 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.128
(also listed as LAS 319 )
show description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, indigenous lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for teaching. This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management (Sustainability), and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for the Global Studies, Environment, and/or the Social Entrepreneurship & Non-profits BDPs).

GRG 331K • Cultural Ecology

37475 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 1.102
(also listed as ANT 324L )
show description

This course examines the human trajectory in progressively gaining control over resources and transforming planet earth into a human home. It is an advanced introduction to human-environment relationships, with a special emphasis on the theories and works of cultural geographers, ecological anthropologists, and environmental historians. Lectures and discussions examine various strategies employed by humans to cope with the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities presented by different natural environments, especially foraging and farming. The course will focus on key ideas and case examples of "classical" cultural ecology, including major transitions in human environment relationships, concepts of ecosystem and adaptation, archaeological findings and implications, and dynamics of agriculture. It will also provide an introduction to political ecology and issues surrounding sustainable development and alternative futures.

GRG 395D • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

37525 • Fall 2012
Meets M 700pm-1000pm GRG 408
(also listed as LAS 388 )
show description

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, and cultural geography. The course will address issues of sustainable development, cultural and political ecology, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, conservation strategies, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. These topics will be developed using examples from Latin America. 

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and some knowledge of rural Latin America or the Caribbean. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable but not necessary. THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED; YOU MUST OBTAIN INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION TO REGISTER.

GRG F323K • Geography Of So America-Arg

84690 • Summer 2012
Meets
(also listed as LAS F330 )
show description

This course examines issues of culture, environment, and sustainable development in South America. An understanding of the dynamics of changing indigenous, colonial, and modern landscapes provides context for debating appropriate development and conservation pathways.  For summer 2012, the course takes full advantage of its location in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as part of the University of Texas's Buenos Aires Study Abroad Program.  Buenos Aires is South America's second largest city, with about 13 million people in the metropolitan area; it is located at the edge of the subtropical, agricultural Pampa.  Buenos Aires has attracted a large number of immigrants from all over the country and a substantial number from the rest of South America, Europe, and Asia. Students will examine selected issues through readings, discussions, and field trips.

Admission to this course is restricted to students admitted to the Buenos Aires Study Abroad Program. (Applications are no longer being accepted).

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

37320 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GRG 102
(also listed as LAS 319 )
show description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching. 

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Science & Technology requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for either the International Studies or Environment BDP). 

Prerequisites:  This course should not be taken by anyone who has completed UGS 303: Latin America Environmental History and Sustainability. Otherwise the course is open to all students.

GRG 395D • Lat Amer Culs, Envir, & Dev

37500 • Fall 2011
Meets M 700pm-1000pm GRG 408
(also listed as LAS 388 )
show description

This seminar is designed to help Latin Americanist students perform academic research on human-environment relationships, as well as to work for and to critique development agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations. The class explores the ideas and methods of a number of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including cultural and political ecology, ecological anthropology, environmental history, development studies, and cultural geography. The course will address issues of sustainable development, cultural identity and territory, gender, the smallholder/ householder focus of production, adaptive tactics and strategies, food and farming, environmental impacts of traditional land use, traditional conservation strategies, cultural survival, population growth, environmental change, and the changing impacts of markets and the state on local economies and land use. These topics will be developed using examples from Latin America. 

GRG S319 • Geography Of Latin America

84745 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm GRG 102
(also listed as LAS S319 )
show description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. An effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching. 

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies, and for a Latin American concentration in International Relations and Global Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the University's Core Requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences.  It may be used to meet the Foreign Language / Culture requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree (for example, in the College of Natural Sciences). This course may not be used towards the Science & Technology requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). The course has a Global Cultures flag. This is also a Bridging Disciplines course (for either the International Studies or Environment BDP). 

Prerequisites:  This course should not be taken by anyone who has completed UGS 303: Latin America Environmental History and Sustainability. Otherwise the course is open to all students.

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

37550 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GRG 102
(also listed as LAS 319 )
show description

Adaptations to population growth and spatial integration in cultural landscapes of great natural and ethnic diversity; problems of frontiers and cities.

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching; it also can serve as a resource for a more advanced career in research.

GRG 390K • Issues In Geography

37290 • Fall 2010
Meets M 700pm-1000pm GRG 408
show description

Examines the history, philosophy, and ontology of geography, including its various subfields. Required of all first-year graduate students in geography.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geography, or graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

84200 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 220
(also listed as LAS 319 )
show description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, climate, plants and animals, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, globalization, population and migration, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival.  The class serves as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching; it also can serve as a resource for a more advanced career in research.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). This is also a Connexus course (Environmental BDP, and others). 

Textbooks:

•Robert B. Kent, Latin America: Regions and Peoples (Guilford 2006)

•Gregory Knapp, ed.  Latin America in the Twenty First Century: Challenges and Solutions (UT Press, 2002). 

 Recommended (not required): Charles C. Mann, 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus

Website:

You can access Blackboard for this course on the following site:  https://courses.utexas.edu/

In addition, other web sites and materials will be assigned during class.  The Blackboard web syllabus and schedule is the official syllabus for this course.  Course lecture Power Points will usually be placed on line within 24 hours after each lecture, but these are no substitute for lecture notes.

Summary of Grading:

Exams and quizzes test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important.  

* Quizzes and attendance (15%).  

* Two Midterms (40%), June 16 and June 28.

* Project (15%).  Details will be on Blackboard.  Due July 5.

* Final Exam (30%).  July 10 (2-5 pm).   

Grading is based on total points (90-100 A, 80-89.5 B, etc) and is not "curved."  Grades in this course are not on the plus or minus system.

Although the course is designed to be accessible to everyone, this is not an easy course, and some students do earn F's and D's every semester.  If you are on probation, or are trying to use this course to raise your GPA to graduate, qualify for a study abroad program, or for other reasons, this course might not meet your needs.

Classroom Policy on Electronic Devices and Behavior

Laptops are NOT allowed. Laptops, cell phones, MP3 players, and other such devices must be turned off and stowed during classes and exams.  Lectures may not be recorded in any way without prior permission.  Online materials may not be copied or distributed without prior permission. In exceptional cases, with prior permission, students will be allowed to take lecture notes on their laptops; in these cases, laptop lecture notes need to provided to the professor for each class, and students need to pledge not to use computers for any other purpose during class. The professor will not provide feedback on lecture notes.

Students will arrive on time, minimize unscheduled personal breaks, and stay until the class ends.  They will respect the views and opinions of their colleagues. Disagreement and debate are encouraged. Intolerance for the views of others is unacceptable.

Accommodations for Special Needs

The University makes reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.  Any student who requires special accommodations must obtain a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to the professor at the beginning of the semester so that needed accommodations can be discussed. The student should remind the professor of any testing accommodations no later than five business days before an exam. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/. 


GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

37320 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GRG 102
show description

Course Description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, ecology, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, the insertion of Latin America in the global economy, population, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class can serve as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). All students are required to take the final exam.

Grading Policy

Exams test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and short-answer essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important. Quizzes are handed out at the beginning of several lectures.

Quizzes & Attendance (15%) Three Exams (60%) Project (details to be announced in class) (25%).

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

84000 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm GRG 102
show description

Course Description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, ecology, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, the insertion of Latin America in the global economy, population, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class can serve as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). All students are required to take the final exam.

Grading Policy

Exams test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and short-answer essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important. Quizzes are handed out at the beginning of several lectures.

Quizzes & Attendance (15%) Three Exams (60%) Project (details to be announced in class) (25%).

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

84080 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1130-100pm GRG 316
show description

Course Description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, ecology, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, the insertion of Latin America in the global economy, population, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class can serve as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). All students are required to take the final exam.

Grading Policy

Exams test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and short-answer essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important. Quizzes are handed out at the beginning of several lectures.

Quizzes & Attendance (15%) Three Exams (60%) Project (details to be announced in class) (25%).

GRG 319 • Geography Of Latin America

36740 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GRG 102
show description

Course Description

This course is a general introduction to Latin American environments and peoples from a geographical perspective. There are no prerequisites, and an effort is made to make the material accessible to the broadest possible range of students, as citizens and future leaders. At the same time, more advanced students can benefit from the exploration of such topics as landforms, ecology, environmental hazards, Native American lifeways and resource management, the insertion of Latin America in the global economy, population, cities, sustainable development, geopolitics, frontiers, conservation, and cultural survival. The class can serve as a basic preparation for travel, business, government service, journalism or volunteer work in Latin America, as well as for elementary or secondary school teaching.

This course can be used toward a major or minor in either Geography or Latin American Studies. In the Geography major, the course meets the human geography core requirement, and is also appropriate for students taking the Cultural Geography, Environmental Resource Management, and General Geography tracks. The course can be used to meet the Area B requirement for the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences. This course may not be used towards the Area C requirement (some other courses in geography do meet this requirement). All students are required to take the final exam.

Grading Policy

Exams test knowledge of locations (with map questions), concepts, explanations, and solutions. The tests contain objective, map, and short-answer essay type questions. The student is responsible for all the material in the readings, assigned web pages, and lectures, including maps and other graphics, but the lectures are most important. Quizzes are handed out at the beginning of several lectures.

Quizzes & Attendance (15%) Three Exams (60%) Project (details to be announced in class) (25%).

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