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Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, Chair 305 E. 23rd Street • CLA 3.306 • A3100 • Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-232-1595

Rich Heyman

Lecturer Ph.D., University of Washington

Rich Heyman

Contact

  • Office: CLA 3.404
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: Mon & Wed 2:00-3:00 and by appointment.
  • Campus Mail Code: A3100

Biography

Interests

Cultural Geography, Urban Geography, Critical Theory and Marxism, History of Geography, Pedagogy, Public Space

GRG 305 • This Human World: Intro To Grg

37745-37770 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description

This course focuses on learning why things are where they are and the processes that underlie spatial patterns. These processes are fundamentally cultural: they involve a complex mix of folk culture, popular culture, communication, religion, demography, industry and urbanization, so the course touches on all of these topics. The course also looks at the indications of human-induced environmental changes, including pollution, resource depletion, and the transformation of ecosystems. It concludes with an introduction to the range of career opportunities for people with training in geography.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based on a combination of three exams (worth approximately 45% of the total grade), three projects (worth approximately 25% of the total grade) and participation (worth approximately 30% of the total grade).

GRG 337 • The Modern American City

37815 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm ART 1.110
(also listed as URB 352 )
show description

Issues facing residents of United States cities, such as transportation and housing, poverty and crime, metropolitan finance, environmental and architectural design; historical/comparative urban evolution.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement.

SAME AS ARC 350R (TOPIC 1) , URB 352 (TOPIC 1).

URB 352 • The Modern American City

38075 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm ART 1.110
(also listed as GRG 337 )
show description

Issues facing residents of United States cities, such as transportation and housing, poverty and crime, metropolitan finance, environmental and architectural design; historical/comparative urban evolution.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement.

SAME AS ARC 350R (TOPIC 1) , URB 352 (TOPIC 1).

GRG 307C • Introduction To Urban Studies

37785 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 1.106
(also listed as URB 301 )
show description

URB 301 INTRODUCTION TO URBAN STUDIES

A multidisciplinary study of cities and complex urban environments; historical and contemporary issues from both national and international perspectives.

May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement.

SAME AS GRG 307C.

GRG 336 • Contemp Cultural Geography

37820 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.102
(also listed as URB 354 )
show description

GRG 336 CONTEMP CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

Recent theoretical developments in cultural geography, with a focus on landscapes and the everyday practices that imbue them with meaning; the ways those meanings are contested and are the foci of struggle; and how the relationship between culture and space plays a central role in the social construction of identity.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement. May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement. May be counted toward the independent inquiry flag requirement.

MEETS WITH URB 354.

GRG 398T • Supervised Teach In Geography

38020 • Fall 2013
Meets W 600pm-900pm CLA 4.106
show description

URB 301 • Introduction To Urban Studies

38105 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 1.106
(also listed as GRG 307C )
show description

URB 301 INTRODUCTION TO URBAN STUDIES

A multidisciplinary study of cities and complex urban environments; historical and contemporary issues from both national and international perspectives.

May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement.

SAME AS GRG 307C.

URB 354 • Contemp Cultural Geography

38165 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.102
(also listed as GRG 336 )
show description

GRG 336 CONTEMP CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

Recent theoretical developments in cultural geography, with a focus on landscapes and the everyday practices that imbue them with meaning; the ways those meanings are contested and are the foci of struggle; and how the relationship between culture and space plays a central role in the social construction of identity.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement. May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement. May be counted toward the independent inquiry flag requirement.

MEETS WITH URB 354.

GRG 307C • Introduction To Urban Studies

37360 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GRG 102
(also listed as URB 301 )
show description

GRG 336 • Contemp Cultural Geography

37380 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GRG 316
(also listed as URB 354 )
show description

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography

37485 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GRG 316
show description

Course Objective and Subjects

The primary objective of this course is to provide you a ‘working understanding’ of the contemporary nature of Geography, which means I am interested in considering Geography as it is practiced. My department expects this course, Frontiers in Geography, to be a ‘capstone’ experience, although none of us really knows what that means. It can be interpreted in a variety of ways and the faculty of our department have tried many of them while teaching this course, based to a great extent upon their own respective personal and academic histories, styles, personalities, and general sense of what is important and what is not. None of them are wrong.

The route I have chosen is a ‘working understanding’, which it is hoped, will complement and supplement what you have been studying for these last few years.

I begin with the simplest of questions—What is Geography?—and then provide a set of fundamentals that will help answer the question, thus providing a ‘working’ understanding:

 It is a set of concepts

 It is a frame for study

 It is a discipline

 It is a university subject

 It is a job

1)  Concepts. In this section we provide an overview of the nature of the discipline—“what are the fundamental precepts that define Geography?” To some extent this is a summary and gathering together of ideas that surround what you have been doing for the last few years as a Geography major. At the same time it is my opportunity to stress my favorite geo-concept: Place, perhaps along with space, its little stepsister.

2) Frame. We use these concepts to help frame our study of geographic processes, especially in terms of the patterns of human activity. Such a framing will help illuminate the essences of these processes.  For the purposes of this class we will focus primarily on ‘place’ in research focused on the example of tourism. The focus of your final capstone paper and most of your readings will be here, therefore, on the subject called “A Geography of Tourism”, framed within the concept of place.

3) Discipline. We will discuss Geography as a contemporary academic discipline in terms of its history, associations, journals, and departments.

4) University. The heart and history of a discipline begins with the university. Here we will talk about the contemporary nature of the American University, especially in this contentious political and economic era; issues of note at the national, state, and UT levels will be discussed.  We do so to understand the home of Geography, but we will spend time on issues that may not have immediate relevance to our discipline.

5) Job. Several of you will be disappointed that this course is not centered on getting you a job.  In fact, we won’t spend much time on the subject at all.  Why?  Because basically it is not within my purview; the truth be known, I don’t know much about that subject, which is true of most of my colleagues.  This goes back to our subject of the University (above); more on that later. But we will not ignore it.  We will work on your resumes, discuss ways you can aggressively engage the lousy market out there, consider issues of cover letters and interviewing, and we will bring people into the classroom who can help provide us some practicalities of the search.  We will also discuss graduate school.  Here I can help much more, although if the past is any predictor fewer than five or six of you will be immediately interested.  We’ll play that one by ear.

The discussion of these five issues will be linear in the most general sense, but because they are often so closely intertwined we will integrate them at times. Also, I cannot assign a specific amount of time for each subject—although the system often asks that I do—because we reserve the right to spend more or less time on individual subjects as we see fit, once we are there. No worries; it will work.

URB 301 • Introduction To Urban Studies

37660 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GRG 102
(also listed as GRG 307C )
show description

URB 354 • Contemp Cultural Geography

37715 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GRG 316
(also listed as GRG 336 )
show description

GRG 337 • The Modern American City

37350 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GRG 102
(also listed as URB 352 )
show description

GRG 356T • Urban Publics

37375 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm GRG 408
(also listed as URB 354 )
show description

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography

37435 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GRG 316
show description

Course Objective and Subjects

The primary objective of this course is to provide you a ‘working understanding’ of the contemporary nature of Geography, which means I am interested in considering Geography as it is practiced. My department expects this course, Frontiers in Geography, to be a ‘capstone’ experience, although none of us really knows what that means. It can be interpreted in a variety of ways and the faculty of our department have tried many of them while teaching this course, based to a great extent upon their own respective personal and academic histories, styles, personalities, and general sense of what is important and what is not. None of them are wrong.

The route I have chosen is a ‘working understanding’, which it is hoped, will complement and supplement what you have been studying for these last few years.

I begin with the simplest of questions—What is Geography?—and then provide a set of fundamentals that will help answer the question, thus providing a ‘working’ understanding:

 It is a set of concepts

 It is a frame for study

 It is a discipline

 It is a university subject

 It is a job

1)  Concepts. In this section we provide an overview of the nature of the discipline—“what are the fundamental precepts that define Geography?” To some extent this is a summary and gathering together of ideas that surround what you have been doing for the last few years as a Geography major. At the same time it is my opportunity to stress my favorite geo-concept: Place, perhaps along with space, its little stepsister.

2) Frame. We use these concepts to help frame our study of geographic processes, especially in terms of the patterns of human activity. Such a framing will help illuminate the essences of these processes.  For the purposes of this class we will focus primarily on ‘place’ in research focused on the example of tourism. The focus of your final capstone paper and most of your readings will be here, therefore, on the subject called “A Geography of Tourism”, framed within the concept of place.

3) Discipline. We will discuss Geography as a contemporary academic discipline in terms of its history, associations, journals, and departments.

4) University. The heart and history of a discipline begins with the university. Here we will talk about the contemporary nature of the American University, especially in this contentious political and economic era; issues of note at the national, state, and UT levels will be discussed.  We do so to understand the home of Geography, but we will spend time on issues that may not have immediate relevance to our discipline.

5) Job. Several of you will be disappointed that this course is not centered on getting you a job.  In fact, we won’t spend much time on the subject at all.  Why?  Because basically it is not within my purview; the truth be known, I don’t know much about that subject, which is true of most of my colleagues.  This goes back to our subject of the University (above); more on that later. But we will not ignore it.  We will work on your resumes, discuss ways you can aggressively engage the lousy market out there, consider issues of cover letters and interviewing, and we will bring people into the classroom who can help provide us some practicalities of the search.  We will also discuss graduate school.  Here I can help much more, although if the past is any predictor fewer than five or six of you will be immediately interested.  We’ll play that one by ear.

The discussion of these five issues will be linear in the most general sense, but because they are often so closely intertwined we will integrate them at times. Also, I cannot assign a specific amount of time for each subject—although the system often asks that I do—because we reserve the right to spend more or less time on individual subjects as we see fit, once we are there. No worries; it will work.

URB 352 • The Modern American City

37650 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GRG 102
(also listed as GRG 337 )
show description

URB 354 • Urban Publics

37685 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm GRG 408
(also listed as GRG 356T )
show description

GRG 336 • Contemp Cultural Geography

37340 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm GRG 312
(also listed as URB 354 )
show description

As an advanced course in cultural geography, this class will survey recent developments, both theoretical and
topical, in the study of cultural landscapes. We'll look at what geographers are currently saying about the relationship between culture and space, especially around power—social, economic, and political. We'll focus on the construction of landscapes and the everyday practices that imbue them with meaning, the ways those meanings are contested and struggled over, and how the relationship between culture and space plays a central role in the social construction of class, gender, sexuality, race, nature, and postcoloniality.

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography

37455 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GRG 316
show description

Geography 374 is designated as a "capstone experience" for students majoring in geography. Taken from the name of the stone placed atop a wall or structure that marks its completion (the opposite of a cornerstone), "capstone" means crowning achievement or culmination. In other words, then, this class is supposed to signify the "culmination" of your undergraduate career as a geographer. But what does that mean? For me, it means that this course tries to provide a structure, a space, and time for thinking holistically about geography: what is the role of geography, geographers, and geographical inquiry in the context of the wider world, especially in relation to social change? You likely have spent your time as an undergraduate learning about various theories and methods of geography (and, in the process, learning about the world and how different physical and social aspects of it work). This class now gives you the opportunity to step back and think about questions like, What is geography? What role does it play in society? How did it emerge? Why is it located in a university? What is it for?

GRG 398T • Supervised Teach In Geography

37550 • Fall 2011
Meets W 500pm-800pm GRG 316
show description

This course will provide graduate students preparing to teach at the college level an exposure to practical techniques for effective teaching and an introduction to pedagogical theory. As an exposure to practical teaching techniques, the course will provide graduate students with a set of tools for thinking about course preparation, syllabus construction, assignment design, grading strategies, approaches to lecturing, methods for effective discussion, etc. As an introduction to pedagogical theory, the goal of this course is to help graduate students begin to define a personal teaching philosophy by thinking about such questions as What is goal of teaching? What are the political, ethical, and philosophical aspects of teaching? and What is the role of the teacher in student learning? The class will mostly be run as a traditional graduate seminar, but occasionally we will have in-class exercises, workshops, role-playing, etc. for the more practical aspects of teaching. Students will prepare a "teaching portfolio" which will include a teaching philosophy statement, a sample syllabus for a course, a lesson plan, and selected sample assignments.

URB 354 • Contemp Cultural Geography

37700 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm GRG 312
(also listed as GRG 336 )
show description

As an advanced course in cultural geography, this class will survey recent developments, both theoretical and
topical, in the study of cultural landscapes. We'll look at what geographers are currently saying about the relationship between culture and space, especially around power—social, economic, and political. We'll focus on the construction of landscapes and the everyday practices that imbue them with meaning, the ways those meanings are contested and struggled over, and how the relationship between culture and space plays a central role in the social construction of class, gender, sexuality, race, nature, and postcoloniality.

GRG 336 • Contemp Cultural Geography

37575 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GRG 316
(also listed as URB 354 )
show description

As an advanced course in cultural geography, this class will survey recent developments, both theoretical and topical, in the study of cultural landscapes. We'll look at what geographers are currently saying about the relationship between culture and space, especially around power—social, economic, and political. We'll focus on the construction of landscapes and the everyday practices that imbue them with meaning, the ways those meanings are contested and struggled over, and how the relationship between culture and space plays a  central role in the social construction of class, gender, sexuality, race, nature, and postcoloniality.

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography

37650 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GRG 312
show description

Geography 374 is designated as a "capstone experience" for students majoring in geography. Taken from the name of the stone placed atop a wall or structure that marks its completion (the opposite of a cornerstone), "capstone" means crowning achievement or culmination. In other words, then, this class is supposed to signify the "culmination" of your undergraduate career as a geographer. But what does that mean? For me, it means that this course tries to provide a structure, a space, and time for thinking holistically about geography: what is the role of geography, geographers, and geographical inquiry in the context of the wider world, especially in relation to social change? You likely have spent your time as an undergraduate learning about various theories and methods of geography (and, in the process, learning about the world and how different physical and social aspects of it work). This class now gives you the opportunity to step back and think about questions like, What is geography? What role does it play in society? How did it emerge? Why is it located in a university? What is it for?

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography

37655 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm GRG 312
show description

Geography 374 is designated as a "capstone experience" for students majoring in geography. Taken from the name of the stone placed atop a wall or structure that marks its completion (the opposite of a cornerstone), "capstone" means crowning achievement or culmination. In other words, then, this class is supposed to signify the "culmination" of your undergraduate career as a geographer. But what does that mean? For me, it means that this course tries to provide a structure, a space, and time for thinking holistically about geography: what is the role of geography, geographers, and geographical inquiry in the context of the wider world, especially in relation to social change? You likely have spent your time as an undergraduate learning about various theories and methods of geography (and, in the process, learning about the world and how different physical and social aspects of it work). This class now gives you the opportunity to step back and think about questions like, What is geography? What role does it play in society? How did it emerge? Why is it located in a university?

URB 354 • Contemp Cultural Geography

37870 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GRG 316
(also listed as GRG 336 )
show description

As an advanced course in cultural geography, this class will survey recent developments, both theoretical and topical, in the study of cultural landscapes. We'll look at what geographers are currently saying about the relationship between culture and space, especially around power—social, economic, and political. We'll focus on the construction of landscapes and the everyday practices that imbue them with meaning, the ways those meanings are contested and struggled over, and how the relationship between culture and space plays a  central role in the social construction of class, gender, sexuality, race, nature, and postcoloniality.

GRG 307C • Introduction To Urban Studies

37105 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CPE 2.204
(also listed as URB 301 )
show description

A multidisciplinary study of cities and complex urban environments; historical and contemporary issues from both national and international perspectives.

May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement.

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography

37255 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GRG 408
show description

Course Objective and Subjects

The primary objective of this course is to provide you a ‘working understanding’ of the contemporary nature of Geography, which means I am interested in considering Geography as it is practiced. My department expects this course, Frontiers in Geography, to be a ‘capstone’ experience, although none of us really knows what that means. It can be interpreted in a variety of ways and the faculty of our department have tried many of them while teaching this course, based to a great extent upon their own respective personal and academic histories, styles, personalities, and general sense of what is important and what is not. None of them are wrong.

The route I have chosen is a ‘working understanding’, which it is hoped, will complement and supplement what you have been studying for these last few years.

I begin with the simplest of questions—What is Geography?—and then provide a set of fundamentals that will help answer the question, thus providing a ‘working’ understanding:

 It is a set of concepts

 It is a frame for study

 It is a discipline

 It is a university subject

 It is a job

1)  Concepts. In this section we provide an overview of the nature of the discipline—“what are the fundamental precepts that define Geography?” To some extent this is a summary and gathering together of ideas that surround what you have been doing for the last few years as a Geography major. At the same time it is my opportunity to stress my favorite geo-concept: Place, perhaps along with space, its little stepsister.

2) Frame. We use these concepts to help frame our study of geographic processes, especially in terms of the patterns of human activity. Such a framing will help illuminate the essences of these processes.  For the purposes of this class we will focus primarily on ‘place’ in research focused on the example of tourism. The focus of your final capstone paper and most of your readings will be here, therefore, on the subject called “A Geography of Tourism”, framed within the concept of place.

3) Discipline. We will discuss Geography as a contemporary academic discipline in terms of its history, associations, journals, and departments.

4) University. The heart and history of a discipline begins with the university. Here we will talk about the contemporary nature of the American University, especially in this contentious political and economic era; issues of note at the national, state, and UT levels will be discussed.  We do so to understand the home of Geography, but we will spend time on issues that may not have immediate relevance to our discipline.

5) Job. Several of you will be disappointed that this course is not centered on getting you a job.  In fact, we won’t spend much time on the subject at all.  Why?  Because basically it is not within my purview; the truth be known, I don’t know much about that subject, which is true of most of my colleagues.  This goes back to our subject of the University (above); more on that later. But we will not ignore it.  We will work on your resumes, discuss ways you can aggressively engage the lousy market out there, consider issues of cover letters and interviewing, and we will bring people into the classroom who can help provide us some practicalities of the search.  We will also discuss graduate school.  Here I can help much more, although if the past is any predictor fewer than five or six of you will be immediately interested.  We’ll play that one by ear.

The discussion of these five issues will be linear in the most general sense, but because they are often so closely intertwined we will integrate them at times. Also, I cannot assign a specific amount of time for each subject—although the system often asks that I do—because we reserve the right to spend more or less time on individual subjects as we see fit, once we are there. No worries; it will work.

GRG 374 • Frontiers In Geography

37260 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GRG 312
show description

Course Objective and Subjects

The primary objective of this course is to provide you a ‘working understanding’ of the contemporary nature of Geography, which means I am interested in considering Geography as it is practiced. My department expects this course, Frontiers in Geography, to be a ‘capstone’ experience, although none of us really knows what that means. It can be interpreted in a variety of ways and the faculty of our department have tried many of them while teaching this course, based to a great extent upon their own respective personal and academic histories, styles, personalities, and general sense of what is important and what is not. None of them are wrong.

The route I have chosen is a ‘working understanding’, which it is hoped, will complement and supplement what you have been studying for these last few years.

I begin with the simplest of questions—What is Geography?—and then provide a set of fundamentals that will help answer the question, thus providing a ‘working’ understanding:

 It is a set of concepts

 It is a frame for study

 It is a discipline

 It is a university subject

 It is a job

1)  Concepts. In this section we provide an overview of the nature of the discipline—“what are the fundamental precepts that define Geography?” To some extent this is a summary and gathering together of ideas that surround what you have been doing for the last few years as a Geography major. At the same time it is my opportunity to stress my favorite geo-concept: Place, perhaps along with space, its little stepsister.

2) Frame. We use these concepts to help frame our study of geographic processes, especially in terms of the patterns of human activity. Such a framing will help illuminate the essences of these processes.  For the purposes of this class we will focus primarily on ‘place’ in research focused on the example of tourism. The focus of your final capstone paper and most of your readings will be here, therefore, on the subject called “A Geography of Tourism”, framed within the concept of place.

3) Discipline. We will discuss Geography as a contemporary academic discipline in terms of its history, associations, journals, and departments.

4) University. The heart and history of a discipline begins with the university. Here we will talk about the contemporary nature of the American University, especially in this contentious political and economic era; issues of note at the national, state, and UT levels will be discussed.  We do so to understand the home of Geography, but we will spend time on issues that may not have immediate relevance to our discipline.

5) Job. Several of you will be disappointed that this course is not centered on getting you a job.  In fact, we won’t spend much time on the subject at all.  Why?  Because basically it is not within my purview; the truth be known, I don’t know much about that subject, which is true of most of my colleagues.  This goes back to our subject of the University (above); more on that later. But we will not ignore it.  We will work on your resumes, discuss ways you can aggressively engage the lousy market out there, consider issues of cover letters and interviewing, and we will bring people into the classroom who can help provide us some practicalities of the search.  We will also discuss graduate school.  Here I can help much more, although if the past is any predictor fewer than five or six of you will be immediately interested.  We’ll play that one by ear.

The discussion of these five issues will be linear in the most general sense, but because they are often so closely intertwined we will integrate them at times. Also, I cannot assign a specific amount of time for each subject—although the system often asks that I do—because we reserve the right to spend more or less time on individual subjects as we see fit, once we are there. No worries; it will work.

URB 301 • Introduction To Urban Studies

37430 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CPE 2.204
(also listed as GRG 307C )
show description

A multidisciplinary study of cities and complex urban environments; historical and contemporary issues from both national and international perspectives.

May be counted toward the cultural diversity flag requirement.

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