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Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, Chair 305 E. 23rd Street • CLA 3.306 • A3100 • Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-232-1595

Peter Ward

Affiliate Faculty Ph.D., University of Liverpool

Professor, Dept. of Sociology, LBJ School; C.B. Smith Sr. Centennial Chair in US-Mexico Relations
Peter Ward

Contact

  • Phone: 512.471-6302
  • Office: CLA 3.730, SRH 3.228
  • Office Hours: Wednesday 1:30-3:15 LBJ SChool; 3:30-5:00pm Sociology
  • Campus Mail Code: A1700

Biography

Peter M. Ward received his Ph.D. from the University of Liverpool in 1976 and subsequently has held senior teaching and research positions at University College London (1976-85), The University of Cambridge (1985-91), and at The University of Texas at Austin (1991-present) where he holds the C.B. Smith Sr. Centennial Chair in US-Mexico Relations, and is professor in the Department of Sociology (College of Liberal Arts), and in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs.  Between 1993-7 and 2001-05, he was Director of the Mexican Center at the Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies.  Between 2002-7 he was Editor-in-Chief of the Latin American Research Review. In 2006 he led the initiative to create the Latin American Housing Network which he coordinates at the University of Texas at Austin www.lahn.utexas.org

In addition to over 120 scholarly articles and book chapters on public policy in Mexico and Latin America, he has written fifteen books including: Housing, the State and the Poor: Policy and Practice in Latin American Cities (with Alan Gilbert), Welfare Politics in Mexico: Papering Over the Cracks, and Mexico City: The Production and Reproduction of an Urban Environment (all translated into Spanish); Self-Help Housing: A Critique, Corruption, Development and Inequality (editor), Methodology for Land and Housing Market Analysis (coeditor), Political Change in Baja California: Democracy in the Making? (with Victoria Rodriguez), and Opposition Governments in Mexico: Past Experiences and Future Opportunities(with Victoria Rodriguez). Mexico City (second edition), New Federalism and State Government in Mexico: Bringing the States Back In (with Victoria Rodriguez), Colonias and Public Policy in Texas: Urbanization by Stealth.  His most recent books are Governance in the Americas: Decentralization Democracy and Subnational Government in the USA, Mexico, and Brazil (2008), Metropolitan Governance in the Federalist Americas (2012), and (2014) Housing Policies in Latin American Cities: A New Generation of Strategies and Approaches for 2016 UN-HABITAT III.

His principal research interests are Latin American urbanization, contemporary Mexican politics, housing policy and planning, Mexico City, and colonia-type housing in the United States. At various times he has served as adviser to the Mexican government and to a number of international development agencies.

NIH Biosketch

GRG 356T • Society Of Modern Mexico

37612 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 130
(also listed as LAS 325, SOC 335, URB 354 )
show description

COURSE AIMS AND PURPOSE

This course seeks to understand Mexico through three lenses. First to introduce students to modern Mexico - its geography, economy, polity and society, and to examine in detail the nature and the forces of change that have impacted so dramatically upon the country during the past two decades. Second, we will examine Mexico-US bi-lateral relations both historically as well as in the contemporary sphere. Third, our lens will focus attention upon “Mexico Here”, and will analyze the dramatic Hispanic “rise” in the USA since 1990, with a special emphasis upon the ways in which the minority majority of Mexicans and Mexican Americans are shaping our own society, economy and polity of central Texas.

The first half of the course will offer an overview of the modern Mexico – its economic and political opening, challenges of overcoming poverty, and more recently the instability born of the drug cartels. Here too we will examine the key bilateral issues between the two countries: immigration reform; insecurity; and economic integration.  The second half of the course is designed to analyze the demographic and socio-cultural changes and policy challenges that Mexican-origin populations confront today in here Central Texas: in education, health care, citizenship aspirations, access to housing, justice and human rights and wellbeing. The aim is to gain a more sensitive and nuanced awareness of how Mexican populations specifically, and Hispanic populations more generally, are transforming the cultural and political landscape of Texas and the US, in order to offer a broad-brush introduction that will allow us consider the public policy dilemmas and imperatives that we have to confront today.

The course will comprise a substantial writing component including three essays. In class participation is expected, and in addition an important element of the class assessment will comprise two group projects about how Mexicans and Mexican-American identities are shaping politics, society & culture (broadly defined) here in Central Texas. There will be one midterm exam, but no final.

Assessment

Essays and Papers 40%

Participation 25%

Mid-term 15%

Group Projects 20%

 

GRG 396T • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

37730 • Fall 2014
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.122
(also listed as LAS 381, SOC 387L )
show description

Course Description

This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist at the LBJ School, as well as in the Sociology and Geography departments. Depending upon the final class size, instruction will be largely through a lecture format although much of the work will be conducted in small groups working on a collaborative research design utilizing and applying different qualitative methods. Specifically the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys.  The course will address issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis.  Participants will be required to undertake IRB training at the outset.

 Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Ethnography, Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.).

It is designed for two principal constituencies: first, for Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and second, for Master students especially those embarking upon their PR’s and theses, although it also forms part of the extended core curriculum in the masters’ program at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.  Each semester students work in small groups to develop a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group’s research design. The research question identified usually will be a project for which no definitive outcome is expected, other than that of having fun, and developing the training exercises itself.

Grading and Requirements:

30% for the Final (Group) Report

30% for an unseen essay exam (three hours)

40% for class participation and performance (which will include the book report and an element of peer group assessment). 

URB 354 • Society Of Modern Mexico

37913 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 130
(also listed as GRG 356T, LAS 325, SOC 335 )
show description

COURSE AIMS AND PURPOSE

This course seeks to understand Mexico through three lenses. First to introduce students to modern Mexico - its geography, economy, polity and society, and to examine in detail the nature and the forces of change that have impacted so dramatically upon the country during the past two decades. Second, we will examine Mexico-US bi-lateral relations both historically as well as in the contemporary sphere. Third, our lens will focus attention upon “Mexico Here”, and will analyze the dramatic Hispanic “rise” in the USA since 1990, with a special emphasis upon the ways in which the minority majority of Mexicans and Mexican Americans are shaping our own society, economy and polity of central Texas.

The first half of the course will offer an overview of the modern Mexico – its economic and political opening, challenges of overcoming poverty, and more recently the instability born of the drug cartels. Here too we will examine the key bilateral issues between the two countries: immigration reform; insecurity; and economic integration.  The second half of the course is designed to analyze the demographic and socio-cultural changes and policy challenges that Mexican-origin populations confront today in here Central Texas: in education, health care, citizenship aspirations, access to housing, justice and human rights and wellbeing. The aim is to gain a more sensitive and nuanced awareness of how Mexican populations specifically, and Hispanic populations more generally, are transforming the cultural and political landscape of Texas and the US, in order to offer a broad-brush introduction that will allow us consider the public policy dilemmas and imperatives that we have to confront today.

The course will comprise a substantial writing component including three essays. In class participation is expected, and in addition an important element of the class assessment will comprise two group projects about how Mexicans and Mexican-American identities are shaping politics, society & culture (broadly defined) here in Central Texas. There will be one midterm exam, but no final.

Assessment

Essays and Papers 40%

Participation 25%

Mid-term 15%

Group Projects 20%

 

GRG 396T • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

37995 • Fall 2013
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.122
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Cross listed wiht PA 397C

Description

Aims and Purposes

 This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on research methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist in Sociology, the LBJ School, and the Geography department. (The course also forms part of the extended core curriculum of the LBJ School of Public Affairs.)  Prospective students should note that the large class size requires that this be taught in a lecture rather than seminar format, although much of the work will be conducted in small groups. (This has worked quite well in previous years.)  Specifically, the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys.  The course addresses issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis.  Participants will undertake IRB training. Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques(participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Case StudiesContent AnalysisFocus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant InterviewingQuestionnaire Design and ApplicationQualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/WritingBehavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.).

It is designed for two principal constituencies: Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and Masters students, especially those embarking upon their PR and theses.  Each class will require students to work in small groups developing a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in constructing as research design and then adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group’s project. The research question identified usually will be one for which no definitive (publishable!) outcome is expected, other than that of developing the training exercises itself.  

Most classes will involve a mixture of formal lecture around pre-circulated notes that are designed to foster class discussion, followed by in-group preparation to apply one or other of the various techniques. Thus, there will be a substantial practical component to this course outside of class hours as each group develops and applies each technique as part of its own mini-research design agenda.  Please note that the time slot deliberately allows participants to continue group work after the class during the lunch period or later in the afternoon/early evening. To the extent possible, please allow for that flexibility as you prepare your fall schedules.

All students will need to log onto the Blackboard, since this will be the principal mechanism for information dissemination, and group liaison. Please note that I do not allow computers or PDAs to be open during lectures so if you want to play at multi-tasking this course is not for you. Sorry!

GRG 396T • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

37550 • Fall 2012
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as LAS 381, SOC 387L )
show description

Cross listed wiht PA 397C

Description

Aims and Purposes

 This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on research methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist in Sociology, the LBJ School, and the Geography department. (The course also forms part of the extended core curriculum of the LBJ School of Public Affairs.)  Prospective students should note that the large class size requires that this be taught in a lecture rather than seminar format, although much of the work will be conducted in small groups. (This has worked quite well in previous years.)  Specifically, the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys.  The course addresses issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis.  Participants will undertake IRB training. Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.).

It is designed for two principal constituencies: Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and Masters students, especially those embarking upon their PR and theses.  Each class will require students to work in small groups developing a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in constructing as research design and then adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group’s project. The research question identified usually will be one for which no definitive (publishable!) outcome is expected, other than that of developing the training exercises itself.  

Most classes will involve a mixture of formal lecture around pre-circulated notes that are designed to foster class discussion, followed by in-group preparation to apply one or other of the various techniques. Thus, there will be a substantial practical component to this course outside of class hours as each group develops and applies each technique as part of its own mini-research design agenda.  Please note that the time slot deliberately allows participants to continue group work after the class during the lunch period or later in the afternoon/early evening. To the extent possible, please allow for that flexibility as you prepare your fall schedules.

All students will need to log onto the Blackboard, since this will be the principal mechanism for information dissemination, and group liaison. Please note that I do not allow computers or PDAs to be open during lectures so if you want to play at multi-tasking this course is not for you. Sorry!

GRG 396T • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

37520 • Fall 2011
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as LAS 381, SOC 387L )
show description

 Course Aims and Purpose

This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on research methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist in Sociology, the LBJ School, and the Geography department. (The course also forms part of the extended core curriculum of the LBJ School of Public Affairs.)  Prospective students should note that the large class size requires that this be taught in a lecture rather than seminar format, although much of the work will be conducted in small groups. (This has worked quite well in previous years.)  Specifically, the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys.  The course addresses issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis.  Participants will undertake IRB training. Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.).

 It is designed for two principal constituencies: Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and Masters students, especially those embarking upon their PR and theses.  Each class will require students to work in small groups developing a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in constructing as research design and then adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group’s project. The research question identified usually will be one for which no definitive (publishable!) outcome is expected, other than that of developing the training exercises itself.  

 Most classes will involve a mixture of formal lecture around pre-circulated notes that are designed to foster class discussion, followed by in-group preparation to apply one or other of the various techniques.  Thus, there will be a substantial practical component to this course outside of class hours as each group develops and applies each technique as part of its own mini-research design agenda.  Please note that the time slot deliberately allows participants to continue group work after the class during the lunch period or later in the afternoon/early evening. To the extent possible, please allow for that flexibility as you prepare your fall schedules.

 All students will need to log onto the Blackboard, since this will be the principal mechanism for information dissemination, and group liaison. Please note that I do not allow computers or PDAs to be open during lectures so if you want to play at multi-tasking this course is not for you. Sorry!

GRG 396T • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

37315 • Fall 2010
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as LAS 381, SOC 387L )
show description

Meets with PA 397C/LAS 381/GRG396T

 

Prequisite:  SOC 384L or equivalent

 

This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist at the LBJ School, as well as in the Sociology and Geography departments. This methods course also forms part of the extended core curriculum of the LBJ School of Public Affairs. Prospective students should note that the large class size requires that the class be taught in a lecture rather than seminar format although much of the work will be conducted in small groups. (This worked quite well in fall 2007 & 2008 when there were 35 students.) Specifically, the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of more qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys. The course will address issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis. Participants will undertake IRB training. Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.). It is designed for two principal constituencies: first, Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and second, Masters students, especially those embarking upon their PR and theses. Each class will require students to work in small groups developing a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group's research design. The research question identified usually will be a project for which no definitive outcome is expected, other than that of developing the training exercises itself.

Publications

Recent Publications 2011 -- present.  (See c.v. for full list since 1976.) 

2011

(98)
“Repensando el espacio geopolítico metropolitano en México: ¿Como lograr un verdadero gobierno y gobernabilidad para todos?” pp. 211-44 La Geografía Contemporánea y Elisée Reclus.  Guénola Capron, Carmen Icazuriaga Montes, Silvana Levi, Eulalia Ribera Carbó and Virginie Thiébaut, Eds.  Publicacions de la Casa Chata: DF.

(99) “Con el título en la mano: The Meaning of Full Property Titles, and the Impact of Titling Programs upon Low Income Housing Improvements in Texas Colonias.”   (Lead author in collaboration with Jane Larson, Flavio de Souza and Cecilia Giusti).*   Law and Social Inquiry. 36, 1, 1-82. *

(100) Self-help Housing Policies for Second Generation Inheritance and Succession of the House that Mum and Dad Built.   Peter Ward [lead author] and Edith Jiménez, in collaboration with Erika Grajeda and Claudia Ubaldo Velázquez.  Habitat International  Vol. 35, 467-485.*

(101) Governança metropolitan nas Américas. Cadernos Metrópole, Vol 13, 25, 15-44  (with Robert Wilson [lead author] and Peter Spink).

 2012

(102) “A Patrimony for the Children”: Low Income Homeownership and Housing (im)Mobility in Latin American Cities.  Annals of the Association of American Geographers (AAAG). Volume 102, Issue 6, 1489-1510.

 (103) Housing and Urban Regeneration in the First Suburbs and “Innerburbs” of the Americas. In International Encyclopedia of Housing and the Home. Susan Smith, Editor in Chief. Elsevier, pp 559-572

(104) Housing Policies in Developing Countries. In International Encyclopedia of Housing and the Home. Susan Smith, Editor in Chief. Elsevier. pp 219-227.

(105) Section Editors’ Introduction: Housing and Wellbeing. . In International Encyclopedia of Housing and the Home. Susan Smith, Editor in Chief. Elsevier.  (With Chris Hamnett.) pp xxx-xxxiii

(106) Sustainable Housing Design and Technology Applications and Policies for Low-income Self-help Settlements, Habitat International  (With Esther Sullivan). Sustainable housing applications and policies for low-income self-build and housing rehab”, Habitat International,  Volume 36, Issue 2, April 2012, Pages 312–323

(107) “Self-Help Housing: Ideas and Practice in the Americas”, Bish Sanyal, Lawrence Vale and Christina Rosan, eds.  Planning Ideas That Matter: Livability, Territoriality, Governance and Reflective Practice . MIT Press.  pp.283-310

(108) “Metropolitan government and governance in Mexico: A contradiction in terms?”  (With Hector Robles*). Pp.141-170 In Metropolitan Governance in the Americas, edited by Peter Spink, Peter Ward and Robert Wilson, University of Notre Dame Press.

(109) Inheritance and Succession among Second and Third Generation Squatter Households in Mexico City (With Erika Grajeda)  Latin American Research Review. Special Issue, pp139-162.

(110) Introductory Overview. Contextualizing Disability: Issues of Immigration, Economics and Family. In Angel. J.,  Markides K., and Torres-Gil, F. eds.Latino Health and Aging. Springer  Publishing Co., New York.

(111) “Hacia una nueva generación de política habitacional en colonias populares consolidadas en México. Regeneración urbana y rehabilitación del hábitat. pp147-258. In Jiménez Huerta, Edith, and Heriberto Cruz Solís, Editors. 2012. Superado la informalidad, nuevos desafíos: políticas para las colonias populares consolidadas. Editorial Universitaria: Universidad de Guadalajara. Mexico

 Metropolitan Governance in the Federalist Americas: Case Studies and Strategies for Equitable and Integrated Development.   (With Peter Spink and Robert Wilson).  2012. The University of Notre Dame Press.

 2013

 (112) “Intergovernmental Collaboration in Metropolitan Areas: The Case of the Federalist Americas.” (with Peter K. Spink and Robert Wilson [lead author]), in Next City: Planning for a New Energy and Climate Future, (Proceedings from the 10th International Urban Planning and Environment Association Symposium), Nicole Gurran, Peter Phipps, and Susan Thompson, eds. (University of Sydney, 2013)  pp. 218-243.

 2014  

(113) The Reproduction of Informality in Low Income Self-Help Housing Communities in the USA In Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris and Vinit Mukhija, editors The Informal City in the USA , MIT Press.

 (114) Measuring Self-Help Home Improvements in Texas Colonias: A Ten Year Natural Experiment”.  With Noah Durst.  Urban Studies.*

 (115) Intensive Case Study Methodology for the Analysis Of Self-Help Housing Consolidation, Household Organization and Mobility. Current Urban Studies, Vol 2.  (Lead Author with E. Jiménez and M. Di Virgilio).

 Housing Policy in Latin American Cities: A New Generation of Strategies and Approaches for UN-Habitat III in 2016., Routledge: Research in Urban Politics and PolicySeries  (Lead Author with E. Jiménez and M. Di Virgilio, & author or coauthor of six chapters).

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