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Kit Belgum, Chair 2505 University Avenue, Burdine Hall 336, Mailcode C3300, Austin TX 78712-1802 • 512-471-4123

Anke J Sanders

Working towards PhD in Educational Psychology, School of Education - University of Texas at Austin

Graduate Student, Department of Educational Psychology

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-5503
  • Office: Burdine 374
  • Office Hours: Wednesday 9.45 - 10.45

Biography

After completing my Abitur, I went to the University of Bonn, Germany, where I studied Political Science, Geography within the North America Program (NAP). In my second year of my Hauptstudium I applied for and was awarded a prestigious Foreign Fellowship to spend my 3rd, the 2007-2008 academic year, at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts. Part of this included a Teaching Assistantship in their German Department. Never would I have thought this “study abroad year” would change my life and prepare me for taking the first big step towards my true passions. One of my discovered passions is to teach my native language, so that I soon decided to apply for the PhD program at the Germanic Studies Department at the University of Texas at Austin, where I successfully completed my Masters Degree in May 2010.

The title of my master's report is "Humor in the Foreign Language Classroom".My Master’s report deals with the effect of humor in the foreign language classroom and I constantly observe classes I teach and that I take myself. I focus on aspects of how students react to the information they ought to learn and the format of how the information is being presented.

At UT Austin I have been able to teach all lower level German language classes as an Assistant Instructor, and worked closely with Dr Zsuzsanna Abrams and Per Urlaub. I continuously reflect on my teaching methodologies and develop course material. To do so I have received a Graduate Research Scholarship to work with Dr. Abrams on her Online Textbook Deutsch im Blick in the summer of 2009. Eventually this brought me closer to the study of practice, theory and the immediate effects and problems in learning, cognition and instruction. In 2011 I recieved a Grant to develop material for using film in the langauge class as well as cooperated with Christina Kellner and Dr Urlaub on designing a Grammar supplement for DiB. Over the summer of 2012 I am editing the DiB textbook and since January I am hosting the Facebook Page for DiB.

I transferred to the Department of Educational Psychology (originally I entered as an Area 1: Learning, Cognition and Instruction student, which has been merged with Area II to form HDCLS ). I am passionate about teaching German, and very grateful that I have had the opportunity to grow in my educational career by learning more about motivation and learning theories. I am very interested in my students' experiences, motivation and feelings in response to the teaching stragedies they are exposed to. My Qualifying paper for my doctorate will deal with self-diclsoure and the L2 motivational self.

 

 

GER 507 • First-Year German II

38440 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 100pm-200pm JES A307A
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Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  5. Reading journals (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 507 • First-Year German II

38040 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 200pm-300pm JES A307A
show description

Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  5. Reading journals (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 506 • First-Year German I

37955 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 200pm-300pm JES A305A
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Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (20%)
  5. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Short collaborative video project (5%)
  8. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37930 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1100am RLM 5.126
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Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge – in this case, German urban culture. Each chapter focuses on a German or Austrian city, allowing students to get to know different ways of life and cultural phenomena tied to specific places. As students visit these different Stationen, they will have the opportunity to regularly reflect on the course’s two overarching and interlocking themes of identity and culture. Students will explore what these concepts mean against the backdrop of such topics as: geography, history, literature, demographics, education, media, pop culture, film, music, art, and architecture. Authentic texts representing a number of genres (especially popular film) will be used to enrich students’ developing content knowledge of the German-speaking world.

The communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members.

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

Required Texts:

  1. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.
  2. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Student Activities Manual for Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Daily homework (20%)
  3. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  4. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (20%)
  5. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506.

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

37990 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-100pm JES A303A
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Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge – in this case, German urban culture. Each chapter focuses on a German or Austrian city, allowing students to get to know different ways of life and cultural phenomena tied to specific places. As students visit these different Stationen, they will have the opportunity to regularly reflect on the course’s two overarching and interlocking themes of identity and culture. Students will explore what these concepts mean against the backdrop of such topics as: geography, history, literature, demographics, education, media, pop culture, film, music, art, and architecture. Authentic texts representing a number of genres (especially popular film) will be used to enrich students’ developing content knowledge of the German-speaking world.

The communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members.

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

Required Texts:

  1. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.
  2. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Student Activities Manual for Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Daily homework (20%)
  3. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  4. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (20%)
  5. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506.

GER N612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

84915 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTH 1000am-1200pm ENS 116
show description

Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge – in this case, German urban culture. Each chapter focuses on a German or Austrian city, allowing students to get to know different ways of life and cultural phenomena tied to specific places. As students visit these different Stationen, they will have the opportunity to regularly reflect on the course’s two overarching and interlocking themes of identity and culture. Students will explore what these concepts mean against the backdrop of such topics as: geography, history, literature, demographics, education, media, pop culture, film, music, art, and architecture. Authentic texts representing a number of genres (especially popular film) will be used to enrich students’ developing content knowledge of the German-speaking world.

The communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members.

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language.  

Required Texts:

  1. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.
  2. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Student Activities Manual for Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Daily homework (20%)
  3. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  4. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (20%)
  5. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506.

GER 506 • First-Year German I

38085 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm JES A305A
show description

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (20%)
  5. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Short collaborative video project (5%)
  8. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 506 • First-Year German I

37725 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 100pm-200pm JES A305A
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Course Description

Welcome to German 506! German 506 is a first semester course for students with a) no prior knowledge of German, or b) no more than one year of high school German, or c) authorization from the German Department based on your UT German Placement Test performance. See your instructor if you are in this course for any other reason. In this course you will begin to learn how to read, listen, write and speak German. You will learn to ask and answer questions; name and describe persons, things, places, and events; deal with a variety of situations; narrate orally and in writing; write letters and postcards; fill out forms; and comprehend a variety of texts. You will also expand your knowledge of the cultures of the German-speaking countries. We hope you will be willing to contribute to the class discussions what you already know. German 506 meets for five hours Mondays - Thursdays. In addition, you should, on average, plan to spend at least 1-2 hours each day studying German: completing written homework, reviewing, reading, and building your vocabulary.

Grading Policy

All German 506 students are evaluated according to the same criteria: A. 5 chapter exams = 50% B. 2 Oral examinations = 10% Each oral exam is worth 5% of your grade. The first one will be administered during the first half of the semester, the second one during the second half of the semester. The best preparation for these exams is regular and active participation in class. The more you participate in class, the more fluently you will speak. C. Brief Quizzes = 15% These quizzes are given in class and can be announced or unannounced. D. Class participation and homework = 25% This grade includes participation and attendance (5%), hand-in homework, attendance at the German Film Series (at least twice / semester), assignments from the Kurspaket, the WebQuests, from Grimm Grammar, etc. (15%). There is no final exam during the final exam period in GER 506 due to the cumulative nature of all of the tests you take. If you show up late for a test, you will still have to finish the test at the same time as the other students. If you do not show up for an exam without having obtained permission from your instructor in advance of the test, you will not receive any credit for the test. Emergencies that can be substantiated to the satisfaction of your instructor will be treated as exceptions. There are no Incompletes given in German 506.

Texts

Deutsch im Blick (2008). Kurspaket (combined textbook & workbook) Available for purchase at IT Copy (512 MLK Boulevard; 476-6662). The video clips can be found at: http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/dib (If you find any links that don't work, please report them to Dr. Per Urlaub at urlaub@mail.utexas.edu, Dr. Abrams at zsabrams@mail.utexas.edu). Grimm Grammar is the grammar portion of the online program. The topics you need to learn are included in each chapter of your Kurspaket, and can be reached through the GG homepage at: http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/gg

GER 312L • Sec-Yr Ger II: Rd Hmn/Soc Sci

84525 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BIO 301
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Course Description

Welcome to German 312L! German 312L is a fourth semester course for students who have completed GER 312K or 312V at UT Austin (with a grade C or better) or who have been advised to take it as a result of the AP Exam or UT German Placement Exam. This course continues where GER 312K left off. The course will help you improve your skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking German with activities both inside and outside of class. German 312L is a three-credit course.

Grading Policy

All German 312L students are evaluated according to the same criteria: A. 45% - 3 fifty-minute tests based on Anders gedacht chapters and readings. Each test is 15% of the final grade. B. 20% - Quizzes. Regular quizzes will accompany the texts we read. Some will be in-class quizzes, and others will be posted in Blackboard and must be completed before coming to class on the day we discuss the texts. C. 20% - Class participation & Homework. Be prepared to volunteer in class during every meeting. Homework is due the day after it is assigned; no late homework will be accepted. D. 15% - 3 essays/text reactions and analyses. Each essay must be typed, 1.5-2 pages (ca. 350-500 words) with 1 inch margins, size 12 font. In the essay you should briefly summarize one of the texts you read in class, then make connections to your own experiences (e.g., explore different behavior or attitudes, but be careful not to overgeneralize). You might want to critique a character or the events of the story. Please proof-read your essay before turning it in. The essay should be coherent, well-argued and thoughtful. Pay attention to correct spelling and grammar. DO NOT USE ONLINE TRANSLATORS; they come up with really strange essays, and you will receive a grade of zero for the assignment.

There is no final exam during the final exam period due to the cumulative nature of all of the tests you take. Each test is 50 minutes long. The tests start and end for all students at the same time. Even if you show up late for a test, you have to finish it at the same time as the other students. If you fail to show up for any exam at the appointed time without having obtained permission from your instructor prior to the test, you will not receive any credit for the test. Emergencies that can be substantiated to the satisfaction of your instructor will be treated as exceptions. There are no Incompletes given in German 312K.

Texts

(1) Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2008). Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Thomson-Heinle. (2) Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2008). Workbook/Lab Manual for Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Thomson-Heinle. (3) Zsuzsanna Abrams (2008). Grimm Grammar. Texas Language Technology Center. http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/gg/index.html We will not use this e-learning environment in the classroom, but you may want to use it to review grammatical aspects of the German language.

Publications

“Grammatik im Blick”, grammar supplement material for “Deutsch im Blick” and “Grimm Grammar” online open source software (http://coerll.utexas.edu/dib/)

Responsible for grammar explanation, exercise design and study tips design sections for the first 4 chapters in collaboration with Christina Kellner and Dr Per Urlaub/Department of Germanic Studies, UT Austin

Designed for the Department of Germanic Studies, available to students as a pdf file through Blackboard, UT Austin or as a print-out.

Contact me, Christina Kellner or Dr. Per Urlaub for permission, if you are interested in using the material. Thank you.

download

Lee, S.,  Schallert, D.L., Song, K., Park, Y., Chiang, Y.V.,  Vogler, J.S., Jordan, M.E., Lee, J., Cheng, A.J., Sanders, A.Z., & Park, J. (2011). Resistance phenomena in collaborative online discussions. Yearbook of the Literary Research Association, 60, 370-388.

"Kebab Connection” Film Package for the use in first year german language classes.

Designed for the Department of Germanic Studies, available to students as a pdf file through Blackboard, UT Austin or as a print-out.

 

Contact me to ask for permission, if you are interested in using the material. Thank you.

download

Deutsch im Blick”, on-line first-year German textbook Responsible for chapter editing, video production, editing, material design and vocabulary editing and recording for Dr. Zsuzsanna Abrams/Department of Germanic Studies, UT Austin.

I am listed under my maiden name: Anke Zwietasch

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