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Kit Belgum, Chair 2505 University Avenue, Burdine Hall 336, Mailcode C3300, Austin TX 78712-1802 • 512-471-4123

Karin Maxey

, University of Texas at Austin

Ph.D. Candidate

Contact

  • Office: Burdine 374
  • Office Hours: M 1:30-2:30 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: C3300

Biography

A native of Freeport, Illinois, Karin came to UT in Fall 2010.  She earned her B.A. in German from Luther College (Decorah, Iowa) in 2007, during which she spent a semester abroad in Münster, Germany and wrote a bachelor's thesis on nostalgia in two post-1989 memoirs (one East German, one West). From 2007-2008, she worked as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant in Kamen, Germany at the Fridtjof-Nansen-Realschule, where she had her first formal teaching experiences, teaching American culture and English language. In 2010, she graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with an M.A. in German, completing a Master's thesis on the intersection of New Objectivity and memory in Irmgard Keun's novel Das kunstseidene Mädchen

Karin has taught since 2004, when she began working as a private tutor at Luther College.  Since then, she has taught and tutored German and Swedish in both formal and informal settings, and served as section head for a content-based fourth-semester German course.  Along with coordinating and teaching, Karin has been involved in multiple curriculum development projects, the most recent of which gave her the opportunity to develop reading modules for second-semester German.  During Summer 2012, Karin worked as Assistant Language Director at Middlebury-Monterey Language Academy, a four-week immersion program for high-school students.  There, she developed her leadership skills while working both as academy administrator and teacher. She is currently an instructor and section head for second-semester German at UT.

Karin's research interests primarily lie in applied linguistics, specifically foreign language pedagogy.  Her dissertation work, a classroom study, investigates whether and how students in second-semester German classes learn to identify cultural perspectives and implications present in authentic, extensive texts. Her secondary focus is twentieth century German literature and culture, specifically during the Weimar Republic. She has presented work on both Weimar Republic literature and foreign language pedagogy.

In her spare time, Karin enjoys puns, singing in an Austin choir, playing the piano, playing Othello, cooking, reading, exploring Austin and traveling.

Interests

Teaching culture, content-based teaching, second language reading, literature and culture of the Weimar Republic, 20th century German literature

GER 506 • First-Year German I

38337 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm BUR 337
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Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (20%)
  5. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Short collaborative video project (5%)
  8. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 507 • First-Year German II

38430 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am JES A307A
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Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  5. Reading journals (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 612 • Accel Sec-Yr Ger: Read Mod Ger

38050 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 800am-1000am PAR 201
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Course Description

German 612 is an intensive intermediate German course that builds on language abilities acquired in German 506-507 (or equivalent). With a content-based approach to language instruction, the course helps students not only to review and expand their German language abilities, but also to develop these within a meaningful context that supports the development of specific content knowledge – in this case, German urban culture. Each chapter focuses on a German or Austrian city, allowing students to get to know different ways of life and cultural phenomena tied to specific places. As students visit these different Stationen, they will have the opportunity to regularly reflect on the course’s two overarching and interlocking themes of identity and culture. Students will explore what these concepts mean against the backdrop of such topics as: geography, history, literature, demographics, education, media, pop culture, film, music, art, and architecture. Authentic texts representing a number of genres (especially popular film) will be used to enrich students’ developing content knowledge of the German-speaking world.

The communicative approach to language learning that we take in this course focuses on learning to use German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts across both spoken and written genres. The course aims to develop students’ ability to interpret (not merely read or listen), communicate (not merely give and receive information), and perform (not merely write or speak) in German. In other words, the course will help students to become literate users of the German language. To this end, students of German 612 are expected to take on greater involvement in their own learning than they have in their beginning-level German language classes. Class activities (from class discussions to group projects) will require collaborative and cooperative learning on the part of all class members.

Please note that this accelerated course requires that students commit approximately 60-120 minutes per weekday (not per class day) to homework and studying outside of class. Students not able to make this commitment over the entire span of the upcoming semester should consider taking German 612 during a semester that allows them to focus fully on the language. 

Required Texts:

  1. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.
  2. Prisca Augustyn & Nikolaus Euba (2012). Student Activities Manual for Stationen: Ein Kursbuch für die Mittelstufe. Second Edition. Thomson-Heinle.

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Daily homework (20%)
  3. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  4. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (20%)
  5. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506.

GER 507 • First-Year German II

37985 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 300pm-400pm JES A307A
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Course Description

German 507, a second-semester German course, continues instruction begun in German 506. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German and did not take GER 506, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) By the end of German 507, students will be familiar with most basic structures of the German language and will have developed basic cultural knowledge about the German-speaking world. As vocabulary and grammar sophistication grow, students will become increasingly proficient at expressing their thoughts, feelings, and opinions on a variety of subjects related to everyday life. To this aim, each lesson centers on linguistic, communicative and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class.

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (25%)
  5. Reading journals (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 612 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

GER 506 • First-Year German I

37880 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm JES A305A
show description

Course Description

German 506, a first semester German course, assumes no prior knowledge of German. (Note: If you have prior knowledge of German, you must take a placement test before taking classes at UT.) German 506 introduces students to the language and culture of the modern German-speaking world. Every effort is made to present opportunities to use the language: for self-expression in everyday situations, for basic survival needs in German-speaking language communities, and for personal enjoyment. To this aim, lessons center on linguistic, communicative, and cultural goals.

The functional communicative approach that we take in this course—and in the larger German program at UT—focuses on learning to use basic German language forms, i.e., grammar and vocabulary, in meaningful contexts in a variety of real-life situations and across spoken and written genres. To help students develop their ability to communicate effectively in German, they are expected to come prepared for class, use German, and actively participate in pair and group activities. Students should expect to spend two hours studying for each class period in order to keep up with the pace of the class. 

Required Texts:

  1. Course textbook: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (by Robert Di Donato), 6th Edition
  2. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Laboratory Manual, 6th Edition
  3. Deutsch: Na klar! Online Workbook, 6th Edition

Grading Policy

Students’ progress in the class will be assessed during the semester across the following categories:

  1. Class participation assessed weekly (10%)
  2. Homework: online and paper-and-pencil (25%)
  3. Short writing tasks with multiple drafts (15%)
  4. Three chapter tests assessing grammar and vocabulary (20%)
  5. Structured reflections in which students reflect on learning experiences (5%)
  6. Quizzes targeting vocabulary (10%)
  7. Short collaborative video project (5%)
  8. Final oral exam done in pairs (10%)

Opportunities for extra credit are available. There are no incompletes given in German 506. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in German 507 (i.e., a C- is not a passing grade).

SWE 604 • Accelerated First-Year Swedish

38420 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1100am BUR 337
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Course Description

An introduction to spoken and written Swedish with an emphasis on active communication, this course will cover basic grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the semester you should be able to read short texts with some ease and to carry on a conversation about an everyday subject with a native speaker. Since Swedish is very similar to English, you'll probably be able to say and understand more than you think you will before you begin to study it! Graded readings in Swedish will also introduce you to aspects of Swedish and Scandinavian culture, and we’ll also view some recent Swedish films—for fun and practice understanding spoken Swedish. Swedish 604 is the first part of a two-semester accelerated course which satisfies the undergraduate language requirement in one year. The first semester covers the basics of Swedish grammar and vocabulary. In the second, students read a variety of texts on literary and cultural issues and respond to them in weekly essays in Swedish.

 

Grading Policy

Attendance and class participation: 30%

Weekly quizzes: 30%

Weekly compositions: 30%

Examination: 10%

 

Texts

Nybörjarsvenska (BlueText) Nybörjarsvenska (Yellow Workbook) Säg det på svenska (Red Text, not the workbook) Prisma's svensk-engelsk ordbok (Swedish-English Dictionary) Recommended: Prisma’s engelsk-svensk ordbok (English-Swedish Dictionary)

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