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Peter Hess, Chair 2505 University Avenue, Burdine Hall 336, Mailcode C3300, Austin TX 78712-1802 • 512-471-4123

Corinne Crane

Assistant Professor Ph.D., Georgetown University

Corinne Crane

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-1358
  • Office: BUR 372
  • Office Hours: Tuesdays (3-4 p.m.) and Thursdays (10-11 a.m.)

Interests

Foreign language pedagogy; curriculum development; second language writing, especially genre theory and evaluative language; systemic functional linguistics; language teacher education

GER 398T • Supervised Teaching In German

37210 • Fall 2015
Meets M 400pm-530pm CLA 0.124
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce approaches to teaching a foreign language (L2) and their theoretical backgrounds.  This course will help successful participants you develop an understanding of underlying principles of learning and teaching, as well as practical skills to use in everyday L2 teaching. It will also help you to develop a critical understanding of the professional debates and career opportunities that relate to language teaching in the United States. We will discuss topics such as

-teaching L2 speaking, listening, reading and writing, 

-communicative L2 teaching and learning,

-the role(s) of grammar in a communicative L2 classroom,

-teaching L2 pragmatics

-vocabulary acquisition

-traditional and alternative ways of language assessment,

-ways of teaching culture, including intercultural competence and cultural analysis,

-the role of technology and online-teaching materials in L2 pedagogy,

-professional debates and controversies regarding the teaching of foreign languages at American universities,

-career opportunities for foreign language educators.

Course Structure:

The course is structured in three phases:

Phase 1: During the summer, participants will work with eight modules of the website “Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/methods/) that introduces learners to the following topics: Speaking, Writing, Listening, Reading, Vocabulary, Grammar, Pragmatics, Assessment.

Phase 2: During the pre-semester orientation, students will further discuss the content of the eight modules and design and critic teaching materials the articulate the principles introduced.

Phase 3: During the fall semester, the class will meet every two weeks for 3 hours to develop a critical understanding of the professional debates and career opportunities that relate to language teaching in the United States. Students will prepare for the meets by reading articles, reports, and chapters. In addition, students will work towards a teaching portfolio that will articulate ideas and content from all three phases.

Requirements:

In order to get the most out of this course, it is essential that learners complete the online modules, prepare for each class meeting by reading the texts carefully, and participate actively during in-class discussions. My role in the classroom is limited to that of a moderator and facilitator. I neither can nor want to dominate the classroom by assuming an expert status. My goal is to foster a group dynamic where we collectively construct insights based on the readings, on our personal experiences as teachers and learners, and on our critical thinking skills. You will quickly realize that like most of my colleagues in the humanities I am intrigued by open-ended reflective questions that we as a group can debate. In contrast, I often remain unsatisfied by quick consensuses, final answers, and cookie-cutter solutions to pedagogical problems.

 

TEXTS

(1) “Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/methods/)

(2) Articles and chapters are identified on the syllabus and will be made available throughout the semester.

 

GRADING

  • 40% Informed and active class participation                                          
  • 20% Quiz                                                                
  • 10% Group presentations, facilitation of class discussions, and discussion questions          
  • 30% Teaching portfolio (teaching materials & philosophy of teaching statement)          

Informed and active class participation  (40%)

Attendance in German 398T is mandatory. In a graduate course much of the information is contributed by the students themselves and generated through interaction of the course participants. Please come prepared each day to discuss the material from the textbook, apply the information to your own teaching and share with your peers what works in the classroom and what does not. You are expected to have read the assigned material prior to coming to class; while you do not have to turn in written assignments, take careful notes on the tasks listed in the syllabus to facilitate a meaningful in-class discussion.    

 

Quiz (20%)

On the first day of the orientation (Phase 2), students will take a quiz that relates to the content of the online materials.

Group presentations, facilitation of class discussions, and discussion questions (10%)

At the beginning of most class periods, you will present in groups the essence of the readings and facilitate the class discussion. To this end, you will generate discussion questions and/or a “Thesenpapier” (statements the stimulate discussions). It is not necessary the purpose of the discussion to generate final answers to these questions, but they will help us to approach the issues at stake. Groups have to electronically hand in their discussion questions and/or the “Thesenpapier” the night before the class meeting.

Teaching portfolio (40%) (Final project)

The teaching portfolio consists of materials that serve practical purposes.  The components of the portfolio are 1) teaching materials, 2)  a philosophy of teaching statement.  By submitting these items, you will get feedback from me and you will develop the skills necessary for reflective teaching. The materials (both teaching and assessment) you include must be tasks that you yourself design, try out in class and can describe in a reflective paragraph on why it worked or did not work.  In the long run, having a complete teaching portfolio -- which you will have to revise and over the span of your teaching career -- serves a practical purpose: such portfolios are not only commonly asked of job candidates, they also help faculty at many institutions to document their teaching excellence for tenure and promotion.  

Teaching materials

You have to design activities (activity sets) that teach reading, writing, speaking, listening, pragmatics, grammar and culture (one activity for each skill/area). You need to include all relevant materials, such as handouts, warm-up and review activities, etc. and a reflective paragraph describing the choices you made in your design (e.g., explain WHY you designed the activity that you did – refer to theories we discuss or you read in the chapters or give rationales you learned from the modules).

Statement of Teaching Philosophy                                                                                                  

In 1-2 pages (max.) describe your beliefs about language learning and teaching, about your roles as instructor, about your views on teaching culture, the four skills, authentic materials, etc. (you do not have to mention all of these items, just what you consider important). Hint:  If you only have 1-2 pages to “make a case for yourself” (persuade the hiring department that they should choose you), what do you really want them to read? 

 

There are no ‘incompletes’ given in this course, unless in the case of documented medical emergencies.

GER 398T • Supervised Teaching In German

38320 • Fall 2014
Meets M 400pm-530pm BUR 232
show description

German 398T will provide graduate students with foundational knowledge for teaching German within a college-level U.S. educational context. The course is designed to support graduate student teachers who have not yet taught a foreign language before, as well as those who come to UT with previous teaching experience.

 

Course Goals and Objectives:

An important objective of the seminar is for graduate students to develop their ability to make informed decisions in current and future instructional contexts. To this end, participation in the course will allow students to:

  • become acquainted with leading language and language learning theories and consider their relationship to pedagogy
  • understand the needs adult, L2 teaching contexts and learners require
  • develop an understanding of the trajectory of language learning, including different instructional levels
  • consider what learner and teacher roles look like
  • understand the role of methodology in teaching and learning
  • become familiar with the institutional and curricular contexts within which teaching and learning take place
  • foster reflective teaching practices

Importantly, the course seeks to also socialize graduate students as language professionals, as they begin to develop a critical understanding of the scholarly and professional debates that relate to college teaching in foreign language departments in the United States.

 

Course Structure:

The course is structured in three phases:

Phase 1:  During the summer, participants will work with eight modules of the website “Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/) that introduces learners to such topics as: Speaking, Writing, Listening, Reading, Vocabulary, Grammar, Pragmatics, Assessment. (NB: Selection of these modules may change for the fall 2013 semester.)

Phase 2:  During a workshop before the beginning of the semester, students will discuss the content of the eight modules and design and critique teaching materials based on the principles introduced in the modules.

Phase 3:  During the fall semester, class will meet weekly for 1.5 hours. Students will prepare for class by reading selected articles from a number of interrelated fields (e.g., applied linguistics, language pedagogy, and education). In pairs, they will conduct classroom observations pertaining to instructional levels within the department’s undergraduate curriculum in order to develop a sense of different language learning profiles and consider language acquisition within a larger curricular framework. Additionally, students will create a reflective teaching portfolio (“Exploratory Practice”) in order to explore individual ‘puzzles’ about teaching and learning.

Finally, students will begin developing documents for their own teaching portfolios (i.e., a teaching/learning philosophy statement and lesson plans/materials development), building on work from all three phases.

 

Materials

“Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/)

Articles and chapters will be announced at the beginning of the semester made available via a course website throughout the semester.

 

Grading

25%                 Class participation (on-line and in-class)                  

20%                 Class observations

30%                 Teaching portfolio (instructional materials and teaching philosophy)

25%                 Reflective teaching (“Exploratory Practice”) portfolio

GER 328 • Advanced German Grammar

38390 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GEA 114
show description

Course Description:
German 328 is designed to help you refine your command and understanding of German grammar.  The course focuses primarily on formal accuracy, but class activities will include communicative applications of grammatical points.  German 328 is not a course in composition, conversation, or stylistics, although there are elements of such courses in German 328.  (The department offers other courses dedicated to these topics.)  You must have completed second year German here at UT or have earned credit for second year German through a placement exam, AP exam, or transfer credit to enroll in German 328.

Texts/Readings:

-Frank E. Donahue, Deutsche Wiederholungsgrammatik (required)
-A German-English dictionary of your choice

Grading/Requirements:
Tests (4 x 20%):     80%
Participation:         20%

Tests:
Four tests will be given over the course of the semester.  Tests typically cover four or more chapters of the textbook and consist of items similar to those on the homework assignments and in-class exercises.  Each test is worth 20% of your semester grade. Because the tests are increasingly cumulative, there is no final exam in this class.

Participation:

Participation includes attendance, asking questions, answering questions, and taking part in class discussions.  Attendance is crucial.  Unexcused absences will result in poor grades for participation!  Please notify the instructor as soon as possible if it is necessary for you to be absent from class.  In accordance with UT policy, you may be excused from class to participate in religious observances and official obligations like club or varsity sports.  In such cases, written documentation must be presented to the instructor at least one week before the absence takes place.

GER 398T • Supervised Teaching In German

38590 • Fall 2013
Meets M 400pm-530pm BUR 232
show description

German 398T will provide graduate students with foundational knowledge for teaching German within a college-level U.S. educational context. The course is designed to support graduate student teachers who have not yet taught a foreign language before, as well as those who come to UT with previous teaching experience.

 

Course Goals and Objectives:

An important objective of the seminar is for graduate students to develop their ability to make informed decisions in current and future instructional contexts. To this end, participation in the course will allow students to:

  • become acquainted with leading language and language learning theories and consider their relationship to pedagogy
  • understand the needs adult, L2 teaching contexts and learners require
  • develop an understanding of the trajectory of language learning, including different instructional levels
  • consider what learner and teacher roles look like
  • understand the role of methodology in teaching and learning
  • become familiar with the institutional and curricular contexts within which teaching and learning take place
  • foster reflective teaching practices

Importantly, the course seeks to also socialize graduate students as language professionals, as they begin to develop a critical understanding of the scholarly and professional debates that relate to college teaching in foreign language departments in the United States.

 

Course Structure:

The course is structured in three phases:

Phase 1:  During the summer, participants will work with eight modules of the website “Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/) that introduces learners to such topics as: Speaking, Writing, Listening, Reading, Vocabulary, Grammar, Pragmatics, Assessment. (NB: Selection of these modules may change for the fall 2013 semester.)

Phase 2:  During a workshop before the beginning of the semester, students will discuss the content of the eight modules and design and critique teaching materials based on the principles introduced in the modules.

Phase 3:  During the fall semester, class will meet weekly for 1.5 hours. Students will prepare for class by reading selected articles from a number of interrelated fields (e.g., applied linguistics, language pedagogy, and education). In pairs, they will conduct classroom observations pertaining to instructional levels within the department’s undergraduate curriculum in order to develop a sense of different language learning profiles and consider language acquisition within a larger curricular framework. Additionally, students will create a reflective teaching portfolio (“Exploratory Practice”) in order to explore individual ‘puzzles’ about teaching and learning.

Finally, students will begin developing documents for their own teaching portfolios (i.e., a teaching/learning philosophy statement and lesson plans/materials development), building on work from all three phases.

 

Materials

“Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/)

Articles and chapters will be announced at the beginning of the semester made available via a course website throughout the semester.

 

Grading

25%                 Class participation (on-line and in-class)                  

20%                 Class observations

30%                 Teaching portfolio (instructional materials and teaching philosophy)

25%                 Reflective teaching (“Exploratory Practice”) portfolio

GER 397P • Sec Lang Wrt: Theory/Res/Pedag

38175 • Spring 2013
Meets M 400pm-700pm BUR 234
show description

This graduate seminar explores current issues in the field of second and foreign language writing research and teaching. Students will learn about different theoretical frameworks through which L2 writing and L2 writing development have been conceptualized, including those that examine writing as process, those that focus on the socio-cultural aspects that impact the development of literacy, and those that explore the linguistic dimensions of written texts. Issues in L2 writing pedagogy will be addressed throughout the course and will enter discussions on such topics as: writing strategies, text and task types typical for L2 writing contexts, the relationship of writing to other modalities (especially reading and speaking), error correction and feedback in writing, the role of technology in supporting L2 writing development, and writing assessment.

Readings

Readings for the course include books chapters and refereed journal articles. The following is a tentative and abbreviated list of works for the seminar:

Asención-Delaney, Y., & Collentine, J. (2011). A multidimensional analysis of a written L2 Spanish corpus. Applied Linguistics, 32(3), 299-322.

Barks, D., & Watts, P. (2001). Textual borrowing strategies for graduate-level ESL writers. In D. Belcher & A. Hirvela (Eds.), Linking literacies. Perspectives on L2 reading-writing connections (pp. 246-267). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Bloch, J. (2008). Blogging as a bridge between multiple forms of literacy: The use of blogs in an academic writing class. In D. Belcher & A. Hirvela (Eds.), The oral-literate connection. Perspectives on L2 speaking, writing, and other media interactions (pp. 288-309). Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.

Brown, N. A., Bown, J., & Eggett, D. L. (2009). Making rapid gains in second language writing: A case study of a third-year Russian language course. Foreign Language Annals, 42(3), 424-452.

Byrnes, H., Maxim, H. H., & Norris, J. M. (2010). Realizing advanced foreign language writing development in collegiate education: Curricular design, pedagogy, assessment. Modern Language Journal, 94 (MLJ Monograph Series).

Charles, M. (2007). Reconciling top-down and bottom-up approaches to graduate writing: Using a corpus to teach rhetorical functions. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 6, 289-302.

Colombi, M. C. (2002). Academic language development in Latino students' writing in Spanish. In M. J. Schleppegrell & M. C. Colombi (Eds.), Developing advanced literacy in first and second language. Meaning with power (pp. 67-86). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Elbow, P. (1999). Research in defense of private writing: Consequences for theory and research. Written Communication, 16(2), 139-170.

Ellis, R., & Yuan, F. (2004). The effects of planning on fluency, complexity, and accuracy in second language narrative writing. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 26(1), 59–84.

Ferris, D. (2007). Preparing teachers to respond to student writing. Journal of Second Language Writing, 16, 165-193.

Flower, L., & Hayes, J. R. (1981). A cognitive process theory of writing College Composition and Communication, 32(4), 365-387.

Haneda, M. (2005). Investing in foreign-language writing: A study of two multicultural learners. Journal of Language, Identity, and Education, 2005(4), 4.

Hood, S. (2004). Managing attitude in undergraduate academic writing: A focus on the introductions to research reports. In L. J. Ravelli & R. A. Ellis (Eds.), Analysing academic writing: Contextualized frameworks (pp. 24-44). New York, NY: Continuum.

Hyland, K. (2007). Genre pedagogy: Language, literacy and L2 writing instruction. Journal of Second Language Writing, 16(3), 148-164.

Hyon, S. (1996). Genre in three traditions: Implications for ESL. TESOL Quarterly, 30(4), 693-722.

Kaplan, R. B. (1966). Cultural thought patterns in inter-cultural education. Language Learning, 16(1-2), 1-20.

Kubota, R., & Lehner, A. (2004). Toward critical contrastive rhetoric. Journal of Second Language Writing, 13, 7-27.

Kuteeva, M. (2011). Wikis and academic writing: Changing the writer-reader relationship. English for Specific Purposes, 30, 44-57.

Leki, I. (1991). Twenty-five years of contrastive rhetoric: Text analysis and writing pedagogies. TESOL Quarterly, 25(1), 123-143.

Lundstrom, K., & Baker, W. (2009). To give is better than to receive: The benefits of peer review to the reviewer’s own writing. Journal of Second Language Writing, 18, 30-43.

Manchón, R. M., Roca de Larios, J., & Murphy, L. (2009). The temporal dimension and problem-solving nature of foreign language composing processes. Implications for theory. In R. M. Manchón (Ed.), Writing in foreign language contexts. Learning, teaching, and research (pp. 102-129). Tonawanda, NY: Multilingual Matters.

O'Sullivan, Í., & Chambers, A. (2006). Learners’ writing skills in French: Corpus consultation and learner evaluation. Journal of Second Language Writing, 15, 49-68.

Prior, P. (1995). Redefining the task:  An ethnographic examination of writing and response in graduate seminars. In D. Belcher & G. Braine (Eds.), Academic writing in a second language: Essays on research and pedagogy (pp. 47-82). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Ryshina-Pankova, M. (2011). Developmental changes in the use of interactional resources: Persuading the reader in FL book reviews. Journal of Second Language Writing, 20, 243-256.

Shaw, P., & Liu, E. T.-K. (1998). What develops in the development of second-language writing? Applied Linguistics, 19(2), 225-254.

Spack, R. (1997). The acquisition of academic literacy in a second language: A longitudinal case study. Written Communication, 14(1), 3-62.

Storch, N. (2005). Collaborative writing: Product, process, and students’ reflections. Journal of Second Language Writing, 14, 153-173.

Thompson, G. (2001). Interaction in academic writing: Learning to argue with the reader. Applied Linguistics, 22(1), 58-78.

Truscott, J. (1996). The case against grammar correction in L2 writing classes. Language Learning, 46(2), 327-369.

Way, D. P., Joiner, E. G., & Seaman, M. A. (2000). Writing in the secondary foreign language classroom: The effects of prompts and tasks on novice learners of French. Modern Language Journal, 84(2), 171-184.

Weigle, S. C. (2007). Teaching writing teachers about assessment. Journal of Second Language Writing, 16, 194-209.

Grading

10%     Class participation                                                                                         

15%     3 Response papers to course readings                                                           

25%     3 Reflective journals:                                                                         

                Literacy autobiography, L2 learning and teaching, and course reflection

25%     Project #1: Literature review with presentation                                

25%     Project #2: Choice of one of the following:                                       

               Book review, research study proposal, or writing workshop

GER 328 • Advanced German Grammar

38010 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 337
show description

Course Description:
German 328 is designed to help you refine your command and understanding of German grammar.  The course focuses primarily on formal accuracy, but class activities will include communicative applications of grammatical points.  German 328 is not a course in composition, conversation, or stylistics, although there are elements of such courses in German 328.  (The department offers other courses dedicated to these topics.)  You must have completed second year German here at UT or have earned credit for second year German through a placement exam, AP exam, or transfer credit to enroll in German 328.

Texts/Readings:

-Frank E. Donahue, Deutsche Wiederholungsgrammatik (required)
-A German-English dictionary of your choice

Grading/Requirements:
Tests (4 x 20%):     80%
Participation:         20%

Tests:
Four tests will be given over the course of the semester.  Tests typically cover four or more chapters of the textbook and consist of items similar to those on the homework assignments and in-class exercises.  Each test is worth 20% of your semester grade. Because the tests are increasingly cumulative, there is no final exam in this class.

Participation:

Participation includes attendance, asking questions, answering questions, and taking part in class discussions.  Attendance is crucial.  Unexcused absences will result in poor grades for participation!  Please notify the instructor as soon as possible if it is necessary for you to be absent from class.  In accordance with UT policy, you may be excused from class to participate in religious observances and official obligations like club or varsity sports.  In such cases, written documentation must be presented to the instructor at least one week before the absence takes place.

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