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Kit Belgum, Chair 2505 University Avenue, Burdine Hall 336, Mailcode C3300, Austin TX 78712-1802 • 512-471-4123

KIRKLAND A FULK

Lecturer Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Contact

Interests

Contemporary German literature and film, Critical Theory, utopias, postcolonialism, theories and representations of alterity

GER 346L • German Lit, Enlightmnt-Present

38215 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 337
(also listed as EUS 347 )
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Description:

A survey of German literature and culture from the mid-eighteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century. This course will cover the intellectual and literary movements of the Enlightenment, Classicism, Romanticism, the Pre-March era, Realism, and Naturalism. We will read and discuss texts from the main literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) as well as some essays and look at artworks from each of the periods in question. We will also learn about some of the most important historical events of the time, including the French Revolution, Industrialization, the German Revolution of 1848, and the German Empire. Our discussions of the texts and artworks will follow the topics of Love and Nature and the ways each individual text and each time period have similar or different understandings of these concepts. Questions we will ask include: What do love and nature mean for each time period? Which person/group of persons is imagined as most ‘natural’ and most ‘lovable’? How do love and nature relate to political order or disorder? What happens when culture and love, or mankind and nature, clash? What can German literary history tell us about our contemporary understandings of love and nature?

In this course, you will learn to 1) read carefully and thoughtfully, 2) identify the significance of literary works and their relation to historical developments, 3) account for the variations in German writing over the century and a half, 4) compare notions of love and nature in different moments in time.

BOOKS:

Required:

Lessing: Emilia Galotti

Hoffmann: Der Sandmann

Hauptmann: Bahnwärter Thiel

Additional readings available in course packet and/or on Canvas.

GRADING:  

Preparation, Participation and Attendance      20%

3 Exams                                                           30%
3 Essays                                                           30%

1 Oral presentation                                          10%

Quizzes                                                           10%


PREREQUISITE:
Three semester hours of upper-division coursework in German with a grade of at least C.

GER 331L • Adv Conversatn & Compos: Lit

38395 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.120
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There are two central goals of this course. The first is to introduce you to several core issues in contemporary Germany to familiarize you with important elements of German culture and society and the ways in which these topics are discussed in Germany. This aspect of the course is meant to prepare you to engage in conversations with Germans on a variety of current and controversial topics. To this end we will read and/or listen to a wide range of material (film, music, poetry, news reports, and print media) that relate to post-wall German society, politics, and culture. These materials are organized according to four broad thematic units. The second goal of the course is to improve your written and spoken command of German. This means that you will expand your active vocabulary, aim for a consistently high level of grammatical accuracy with basic structures, continually add more advanced grammatical structures to your active repertoire, and increase the linguistic register at which you can produce German. You will be expected to use grammatical structures appropriately and thoughtfully and to add increasingly sophisticated and complex elements first to your written essays and then to your spoken German. We will practice these elements in interaction (dialogues, conversations, question-and-answer settings, and debates) before you use them in formal group and individual presentations. The course will be conducted in German.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this semester you should be able to:
• compose short written essays in German with a high degree of grammatical accuracy, a varied vocabulary, and in a formal register;
• participate in verbal interactions in German with ease and advanced fluency using both colloquial phrasing in conversation as well as formal elements in debates and presentations;
• understand and comment on primary German sources about contemporary Germany; and demonstrate a solid understanding of core issues central to German society and culture.

Texts/Readings:
All of the required material is available online or via Blackboard. It is expected that you print out each text and worksheet in advance of the respective class, make notes on it as you read it, and bring it to class. Each video should be watched multiple times and you should bring questions pertaining to the material read and/or viewed. There are supplementary documents in the file “TEXTE” and stylistic rubrics in the “Materialien” folder. Consult these folders each week.

Grading:
Preparation and participation    15%
Weekly writing assignments    15%
Quizzes                10%
Three two-page papers        40%
Group presentation            20%
Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final course grade.

GER 373 • German Science Fiction

38430 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.120
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Description:

What is Science Fiction? What does Science Fiction do? Is it merely a flight of fantasy, an easy escape into another world or time? While until recently condoned as conformist, “Trivialliteratur” (popular or trashy fiction), science-fiction, in general, and German science-fiction, in particular, are especially adept at investigating questions of otherness and alterity. It contains as well a subversive quality (particularly in the GDR) that interrogates and critiques our world as much as other worlds. In this course we will explore the other worlds of science fiction by examining East and West German literature and film from both before and after reunification. Themes that we will cover over the course of the semester include encounters with aliens, distant planets and galaxies, technology and virtual worlds, alternative histories and timelines, utopia and dystopia. This course will also teach students to engage both primary and secondary materials in order to broaden their understanding of literary criticism and aid them in the writing of a final paper. Primary texts, class discussions, and assignments in German. Secondary readings in German and English.   

 

Readings and Films:

Wolfgang Jeschke: “Welt ohne Horizon,” “Die Anderen”

Perry Rhodan #1

Reinmar Cunis: Livesendung

Peter O. Chotjewitz: “Bericht über die Abschaffung der Folter auf Pollux”

Ronald M. Hahn: Ein dutzend H-Bomben

Alexander Kröger: Andere

Angela and Karlheinz Steinmüller: Der Traum vom großen roten Fleck

Christian Kracht: Ich werde hier sein im Sonnenschein und im Schatten

 

Willi Tobler und der Untergang der 6. Flotte, dir. Alexander Kluge

Welt am Draht, dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Im Staub der Sterne, dir. Gottfried Kolditz

Alpha 0.7: Der Feind in Dir

 

Other readings will be available either on the course website or in the course packet. Film screenings are mandatory.

 

Grading:

Participation (including attendance and homework):              40%

2 Short papers (3 pages):                                                        20%

Final paper:                                                                             30%

Presentation:                                                                           10% 

GRC 360E • Protest/Revolt Postwar Germany

38614 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 234
(also listed as EUS 346 )
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WRITING FLAG COURSE

Description:

The social, cultural, and political development of post-war Germany can hardly be thought apart from the protests that erupted in the streets in the 1960s. What initially began as a demand for a reform of the university system quickly became an outright challenge to the West German government. Issues ranging from the Nazi past, the Vietnam War, and German rearmament, to criticisms of the media and the politicization of literature and film became central concerns for a generation that viewed itself as a revolutionary force capable of effecting significant change. As the sixties together with the large-scale protests that characterized the decade came to an end, however, other movements arose in their wake. The rise of the Green movement, feminism, and terrorism in the 1970s as well as the anti-nuclear movement, anti-fascist (antifa) demonstrations, and the recent Occupy Germany movement all, in some way, owe a great deal to this pivotal moment in West Germany.

Throughout this course we will engage a wide variety of materials (film, literature, theoretical texts, and the internet) in order to examine the influence of protest, revolt, and revolution on post-war German society from the 1960s to the present. To what extent is the “spirit of the sixties” still alive and to what end? What are the legacies, and perhaps myths, that coalesce around such movements in the contemporary imagination? How does this triumvirate continue to shape Germany today?

Readings and class discussions in English. 

 

Readings and Films:

Michael (Bommi) Baumann: How it all began

Peter Schneider: Lenz

Verena Stefan: Shedding

Rudi Dutschke: The Students and the Revolution

Ulrike Meinhof: Everybody Talks about the Weather…We don’t

Herbert Marcuse: Repressive Tolerance, The One-Dimensional Man (excerpts)

Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer: “The Culture Industry”

Petra Kelly, Thinking Green! Essays on Environmentalism, Feminism, and Nonviolence

 

Artists under the Big Top: perplexed (Die Artisten in der Zirkuskuppel: ratlos)

dir. Alexander Kluge

Germany in Autumn (Deutschland im Herbst), dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Alexander Kluge,

Volker Schlöndorff, et. al.

The Baader-Meinhof Complex, dir. Uli Edel

The Edukators (Die fetten Jahre sind vorbei), dir. Hans Weingartner

 

Primary and secondary sources will be available on the course website or in the course packet. Film screenings are mandatory.           

 

Grading:

Participation (including attendance and homework):                          30%

2 response papers (3 pages):                                                        20%

Final paper:                                                                                40%

Presentation:                                                                              10%

GER 604 • Accelerated First-Year German

38395 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 800am-1000am JES A307A
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Course Description

German 604 is first year, accelerated course for students with a) no prior knowledge of German, or b) no more than one year of high school German, or c) authorization from the German Department based on your UT German Placement Test performance. See your instructor if you are in this course for any other reason. In this course you will begin to learn to comprehend and speak German with good accuracy provided you prepare thoroughly outside of class and take an active part in class. In class you will learn to use German to ask and answer questions; name and describe persons, things, places, and events; deal with a variety of situations; narrate orally and in writing; write letters and postcards; fill out forms; and comprehend a variety of texts. The pace will be intense, and you will need dedication and motivation to succeed.

Grading Policy

a) 4 fifty-minute chapter exams = 40%. Each exam focuses on two or more chapters but will reiterate material from prior ones as well. Each exam tests writing, reading, listening comprehension & grammatical accuracy. There is no final exam during the final exam period in GER 604 because all tests that you take are cumulative. b) 1 oral examination = 10%. The oral exam, worth 10%, will be conducted after Kapitel 10. Your instructor will administer the exams outside of class time. The best preparation for this test is regular and active participation in class. c) Brief quizzes = 15%. Quizzes can be announced or unannounced. You may not make up missed quizzes but I will drop your two lowest quiz scores. d) Class participation = 15%. This portion of your grade will be based on your daily preparation and performance (i.e., speaking German in class). e) Written homework = 20%. Homework is due on the assigned date; any assignments turned in a day late will be accepted with a penalty. No homework can be turned in for credit after that.

Texts

Robert Di Donato, Monica Clyde, Jacqueline Vensant: Deutsch: Na klar! An Introductory German Course (Student Edition). 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill.

GER 331L • Adv Conversatn & Compos: Lit

38480 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 1
show description

There are two central goals of this course. The first is to introduce you to several core issues in contemporary Germany to familiarize you with important elements of German culture and society and the ways in which these topics are discussed in Germany. This aspect of the course is meant to prepare you to engage in conversations with Germans on a variety of current and controversial topics. To this end we will read and/or listen to a wide range of material (film, music, poetry, news reports, and print media) that relate to post-wall German society, politics, and culture. These materials are organized according to four broad thematic units. The second goal of the course is to improve your written and spoken command of German. This means that you will expand your active vocabulary, aim for a consistently high level of grammatical accuracy with basic structures, continually add more advanced grammatical structures to your active repertoire, and increase the linguistic register at which you can produce German. You will be expected to use grammatical structures appropriately and thoughtfully and to add increasingly sophisticated and complex elements first to your written essays and then to your spoken German. We will practice these elements in interaction (dialogues, conversations, question-and-answer settings, and debates) before you use them in formal group and individual presentations. The course will be conducted in German.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this semester you should be able to:
• compose short written essays in German with a high degree of grammatical accuracy, a varied vocabulary, and in a formal register;
• participate in verbal interactions in German with ease and advanced fluency using both colloquial phrasing in conversation as well as formal elements in debates and presentations;
• understand and comment on primary German sources about contemporary Germany; and demonstrate a solid understanding of core issues central to German society and culture.

Texts/Readings:
All of the required material is available online or via Blackboard. It is expected that you print out each text and worksheet in advance of the respective class, make notes on it as you read it, and bring it to class. Each video should be watched multiple times and you should bring questions pertaining to the material read and/or viewed. There are supplementary documents in the file “TEXTE” and stylistic rubrics in the “Materialien” folder. Consult these folders each week.

Grading:
Preparation and participation    15%
Weekly writing assignments    15%
Quizzes                10%
Three two-page papers        40%
Group presentation            20%
Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final course grade.

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