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Kit Belgum, Chair 2505 University Avenue, Burdine Hall 336, Mailcode C3300, Austin TX 78712-1802 • 512-471-4123

JAMES C KEARNEY

Lecturer Ph.D., University of Texas

JAMES C KEARNEY
" Es irrt der mensch solange er strebt; ubi liberias, ibi patria "

Contact

Biography

James C. Kearney    short bio

I grew up on a historic Colorado County Ranch between Weimar and Columbus where I still make my home with my wife of forty years, Paulina van Bavel. We have three grown children. I graduated from the University of Texas in 1969 with a dual major in History and German literature. Thereafter I was drafted and served as a combat medic in Vietnam.  I subsequently received my PhD from the Department of Germanic Studies at UT and taught German at Katy High School for a number of years.  

I teach an upper division course on European immigration to Texas in the 19th century.

I am the author of two books: Nassau Plantation; The Evolution of a Texas German Slave Plantation, (University of North Texas Press, 2009) and Friedrichsburg; The Colony of the German Fürstenverein, (University of Texas Press, 2011). The latter book received the Summerfield G. Roberts award for the best book on Texas history for the year 2012.  

I also contributed a chapter on European immigration in Texas in the 19th century to a college textbook entitled Discovering Texas History (University of Oklahoma Press, 2014.)

I also have two books due for release next year: Detlev Dunt's Travels to Texas in 1834 (UT Press) and No Hope for Heaven; No Fear of Hell: Private Justice in Colorado County (University of North Texas Press).

 I am working on several other books at the present including a comprehensive history of the Society for the Protection of German Emigrants in Texas, an annotated translation of W.A. Trenckmann's Texas Civil War novel, Die Lateiner am Possum Creek, and a history of the Delaware Indians in Texas.

 

 

Interests

blues guitar, horses, Texas Germans, Texas feuds, barbecue, Texas Indians, rafting, canoeing

GSD 360 • Europ Immigration/Texas/19th C

38420 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 337
(also listed as AMS 321, EUS 346 )
show description

In the nineteenth century waves of immigrants from several Central and Northern European countries altered the demographics of Texas significantly while accelerating both economic and agricultural development of the republic and (later) state. Painted churches, dance halls, sausage festivals, etc. still speak to the cultural legacy of these immigrants in large swaths of Texas while, amazingly, pockets of diglossia still survive after several generations. The immigrant story often intertwined with larger themes of Texas history such as frontier, Native Americans, and slavery. Contrasting attitudes and values led to conflict at times, especially during the Civil War, since many of the immigrants openly opposed secession and/or slavery. 

This course will examine both the push—the causes of European emigration—and the pull—the attraction of Texas as a destination. The goal is to further our understanding of the cultural and social forces at play in the nineteenth century on both sides of the Atlantic and to deepen our appreciation for the positive contributions of the many different European nationalities that have added strands to the rich and colorful tapestry of the state.

Readings for classroom discussion will all come from online sources, either posted on my website or available through the Handbook of Texas online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook) and the Portal of Texas History (http://texashistory.unt.edu/). These will include the following:

  • Barker, Eugene C. "AUSTIN, STEPHEN FULLER," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fau14).
  • Barr, Alwyn. "LATE NINETEENTH-CENTURY TEXAS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/npl01).
  • Biesele, Rudolph L. “The Relations between the German Settlers and the Indians in Texas, 1844-1860,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 31, No. 2 (October 1927), 116-129. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101088/m1/128/)
  • Biesele, Rudolph L. “Early Times in New Braunfels and Comal County,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 50, No.1 (July 1947) 75-92. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101117/m1/91/)
  • Elliott, Claude. "Union Sentiment in Texas, 1861–1865," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 50 (April 1947), 449-477. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101117/m1/557/)
  • Ernst, Friedrich. Letter from Mill Creek, 1832. Reprod. in Detlev Dunt, Reise nach Texas in 1834 [Journey to Texas in 1834], transl. by James Kearney and Geir Bentzen.
  • Gould, Lewis L. "PROGRESSIVE ERA," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/npp01).
  • Grider, Sylvia. "WENDS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/plw01).
  • Hawgood, John. Chapter VI. “The Planting of a New Germany in the Republic and State of Texas,” in The Tragedy of German-America; The Germans in the United States of America during the Nineteenth Century and After (New York, 1940; rpt., New York: Arno Press, 1970), 137-200.  Available as an online Google book.
  • Jordan, Terry G. EMIGRANTS' GUIDES TO TEXAS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kve01).
  • Jordan, Terry G.  "GERMANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/png02)
  • Jordan, Terry G. "The German Settlement of Texas after 1865," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 73, No.  2, (Oct. 1969), 193-212. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117147/m1/215/)
  • Leatherwood, Art. "SWEDES," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/pts01).
  • Machann, Clinton. "CZECHS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/plc02).
  • Nance, Joseph Milton. "REPUBLIC OF TEXAS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/mzr02).
  • Narrett, David E. “A Choice of Destiny: Immigration Policy, Slavery, and the Annexation of Texas.” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. 100 (July 1996-April 1997), No. 3, 271-304. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101218/m1/337/)
  • Perkowski, Jan L. and Jan Maria Wozniak, "POLES," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/plp01).
  •  (http://www.tshaonline.org/shqonline/toc/vol-050-1143)
  • Ransom, Harry Hunt, "A Renaissance Gentleman in Texas: Notes on the Life and Library of Swante Palm," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 53, No. 3 (Jan. 1950), 225-238. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101126/m1/301/)
  • Schottenstein, Allison. "Jewish Immigration in Small Town Texas” (Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin, 2011)
  • Unstad, Lyder L. "Norwegian Migration to Texas," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 43, No.2 (Oct. 1939), 176-195. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101111/m1/190/)
  • Werner, George C. "RAILROADS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eqr01).
  • Wooster, Ralph A. "An Analysis of the Texas Know Nothings," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 70, No. 3, (January 1967).  414-423. (http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101199/m1/439/?q=Wooster)

 

The following books will be reserved for reference and as a resource for papers: 

Barr, Alwyn. Reconstruction to Reform: Texas Politics, 1876–1906 (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1971).

Benjamin, Gilbert Giddings. The Germans in Texas: A Study in Immigration. Austin: Jenkins Publishing Co., 1974.

Biesele, Rudolph L. The History of the German Settlements in Texas, 1831–1861 (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1930; rpt. 1964).

Boas, Hans C.  The Life and Death of Texas German (Durham: Duke University, 2009)

Campbell, Randolph B. Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State (Oxford University Press, USA , 2004).

Hewitt, William Philip. “The Czechs in Texas; A study of the Immigration and Development of Czech Ethnicity, 1850-1920,” (Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin, 1978).

Jordan, Terry G.  German Seed in Texas Soil: Immigrant Farmers in Nineteenth-Century Texas (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1966).

Jordan, Terry G. Immigration to Texas (Boston: American Press, 1980).

Kearney, James C. “European Immigration in Texas in the Nineteenth Century; A Historiography” from Understanding Texas History, Bruce Glasrud and Light Townsend Cummins, eds. (University of Oklahoma Press, 2013).

Kitchen, Martin. The Political Economy of Germany, 1815-1914 (London: Croom Helm; Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press).

Kohn, Hans. The Mind of Germany (New York: Charles Scribner, 1960)

Konecny, Lawrence H. and Clinton Machann, Perilous Voyages; Czech and English Immigrants to Texas in the 1870s (College Station: Texas A&M Press, 2004).

Lich, Glen E. and Dona B. Reeves, eds., German Culture in Texas (Boston: Twayne, 1980).

MacDonald, Archie P. Texas: A Brief History (State House Press, 2007).

Machann, Clinton and James W. Mendl. Krásná Amerika: A Study of the Texas Czechs, 1851–1939 (Austin: Eakin Press, 1983).

Przygoda, Jacek. Texas Pioneers from Poland; A study in Ethnic History (Waco: Texian Press, 1971).

Siegel, Stanley. A Political History of the Texas Republic (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1956)

Stone, Bryan F. The Chosen Folks: Jews on the Frontiers of Texas (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2012).

Strubberg, Friedrich Armand, James C. Kearney, transl. Friedrichsburg; die Colonie des deutschen Fürstenvereins (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2012).

Taylor, A.J.P. The Course of German History: a Survey of the Development of Germany since 1815 (Routledge; 2 ed., 2001).

Weiner, Hollace, ed., Lone Stars of David: The Jews of Texas (Brandeis University and Texas Jewish Historical Society, 2007).

Grading:

Participation 35%

Response papers 35%

Final paper 30%

GRC 327E • Europn Immigratn Texas 19th-C

38685 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GEA 114
(also listed as AMS 321, EUS 346 )
show description

In the nineteenth century waves of immigrants from several Central and Northern European countries altered the demographics of Texas significantly while accelerating both economic and agricultural development of the republic and (later) state. Painted churches, dance halls, sausage festivals, etc. still speak to the cultural legacy of these immigrants in large swaths of Texas while, amazingly, pockets of diglossia still survive after several generations. The immigrant story often intertwined with larger themes of Texas history such as frontier, Native Americans, and slavery. Contrasting attitudes and values led to conflict at times, especially during the Civil War, since many of the immigrants openly opposed secession and/or slavery. 

            This course will examine both the push—the causes of European emigration—and the pull—the attraction of Texas as a destination. The goal is to further our understanding of the cultural and social forces at play in the nineteenth century on both sides of the Atlantic and to deepen our appreciation for the positive contributions of the many different European nationalities that have added strands to the rich and colorful tapestry of the state.

            Readings for classroom discussion will all come from online sources, either posted on my website or available through the Handbook of Texas online. It will not be necessary to purchase any books.

            This will be a project-oriented course. We will tour the Briscoe Center for American History Studies, the Texas State Library, and the General Land Office, all located in Austin and all important repositories of primary and secondary source information. Students will do a mini-research paper and short presentation based on research in one or all of these facilities.

Readings for classroom discussion will all come from online sources, either posted on my website or available through the Handbook of Texas online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook) and the Portal of Texas History (http://texashistory.unt.edu/).

Grading:

Participation 35%

Response papers 35%

Final paper 30%

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