Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
germanic masthead germanic masthead
Kit Belgum, Chair 2505 University Avenue, Burdine Hall 336, Mailcode C3300, Austin TX 78712-1802 • 512-471-4123

Per Urlaub

Assistant Professor Ph.D., German Studies, Stanford University

Per Urlaub

Contact

Interests

Reading Research; Second Language Studies; Language, Culture & Technology, Curriculum

GER 301 • Ger For Grad Stu In Other Dept

38125 • Fall 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm JES A203A
show description

Beginning reading course for students preparing to fulfill language requirement for advanced degrees. Emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, and translation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be used to fulfill the undergraduate foreign language requirement.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GER 328 • Advanced German Grammar

38205 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
show description

Course Description:
German 328 is designed to help you refine your command and understanding of German grammar.  The course focuses primarily on formal accuracy, but class activities will include communicative applications of grammatical points.  German 328 is not a course in composition, conversation, or stylistics, although there are elements of such courses in German 328.  (The department offers other courses dedicated to these topics.)  You must have completed second year German here at UT or have earned credit for second year German through a placement exam, AP exam, or transfer credit to enroll in German 328.

Texts/Readings:

-Frank E. Donahue, Deutsche Wiederholungsgrammatik (required)
-A German-English dictionary of your choice

Grading/Requirements:
Tests (4 x 20%):     80%
Participation:         20%

Tests:
Four tests will be given over the course of the semester.  Tests typically cover four or more chapters of the textbook and consist of items similar to those on the homework assignments and in-class exercises.  Each test is worth 20% of your semester grade. Because the tests are increasingly cumulative, there is no final exam in this class.

Participation:

Participation includes attendance, asking questions, answering questions, and taking part in class discussions.  Attendance is crucial.  Unexcused absences will result in poor grades for participation!  Please notify the instructor as soon as possible if it is necessary for you to be absent from class.  In accordance with UT policy, you may be excused from class to participate in religious observances and official obligations like club or varsity sports.  In such cases, written documentation must be presented to the instructor at least one week before the absence takes place.

GER 397P • Reading In The Second Language

38495 • Spring 2014
Meets M 400pm-700pm BUR 128
show description

TITLE:  (LITERARY) READING IN THE SECOND LANGUAGE: THEORETICAL, INSTRUCTIONAL AND CURRICULAR PERSEPCETIVES

BACKGROUND

This seminar is designed for students in second language studies, literary studies, linguistics, and education. Students will develop a theoretical understanding of the second language reading process as well as relevant critical theory and apply these insights to analyze the shifting roles of (literary) texts in instructional and curricular contexts of language/culture learning. In addition, students will use these insights to critique and rethink the institutional and curricular frameworks that structure the academic disciplines that are concerned with the study and teaching of reading.

THEORETICAL MODULE

We will begin the semester with fundamental questions concerning the (second language) reading process and the shifting status of (literary) reading in foreign language education: ‘What is reading (comprehension)?’, ‘How/Why is/was reading taught?’, ‘What are the differences between L1 and L2 reading (instruction)? -- as well as -- ‘What are the differences between literary and non-literary reading?’ and ‘How can we model the reading process of literary texts in a second language?’. Whereas the first three questions can be tackled through insights developed by educational linguistics and psychologists, the latter two questions require theoretical approaches that are located outside the narrow “applied linguistics canon”. Therefore, we will also examine a variety of critical theories that seek to provide an understanding of the interaction between recipient and artwork across cultural and linguistic distance. We will revisit insights from Hermeneutics, in particular Hans-Georg Gadamer’s concept of fusion of horizons, and reader-response theorists (Fish, Jauss, Iser) that frame the literary reading processes in L1 contexts and discuss how these ideas can theorize reading processes in second language contexts. We will also discuss how these theories provide can be instrumentalized to recalibrate instructional and curricular challenges in the various contexts of foreign language education.    

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MODULE  

During the second module students will apply the theoretical insights gained in the first half of the course to a variety of practical contexts. Specifically, they will critical analyze existing foreign language curricula, course designs, instructional materials, and teaching approaches to reading and literature and assess to what degree theses discourses have (not) been informed by the theoretical scholarship. In addition, participants will have the opportunity to didactize cultural materials for beginning, intermediate, advanced stages of the undergraduate curriculum as well as K-12 contexts. There are two rationales for these ‘hands-on’ activities in the second half of the semester: Students will not only create a body of materials that they can use in current and future classrooms and for their teaching portfolia, they will also develop a more critical view of the concept of the theoretical concepts through their attempt to articulate them in the classroom and may also experience the limitations of a reading-centered approaches to language teaching. 

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING POLICY

*Weekly reactions to the readings (250-500 words): 20%

*Presentations: 20%

*Participation: 20%   

*Final project (three options): 40%

(1) A theoretical research paper that uses critical/literary theory and applies it to an educational discourse in culture-centered FL education.

(2) A theoretical research paper that uses (educational) linguistic theory and applies it to an educational discourse in culture-centered collegiate FL education.

(3) A substantial body of instructional materials (course designs, didactizations, activities, assignment, assessment instruments) that are based on the principles discussed in the course and accompanied by reflective statements.

LANGUAGE

Since this class is geared to attract graduate students from a variety of departmental and linguistic backgrounds, all readings and classroom discussions will be conducted in English. Instructional materials developed for the instruction in languages other than English must be accompanied by short translations or explanations, so that they are assessable for all course participants. Theoretical research papers must be written in English, and permission to write in German will only granted in exceptional cases.

Readings

Elizabeth Bernhardt. (2011). Understanding Advanced Second Language Reading. New York: Routledge.

William Grabe. (2009). Reading in a Second Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Janet Swaffar & Katherine Arens. (2005). Remapping the Foreign Language Curriculum. New York: MLA.

Articles/Chapters by Goodman, Gough, Stanovic, Kintsch, Cummins, Steffenson, Bernhardt/Kamil, Bernhardt/Berman, Pressley, Beck, Byrnes/Kord, Donato/Brooks, Fecteau, Zyzik/Polio, Gadamer, Schleiermacher, Iser, Fish, Jauss.

GER 301 • Ger For Grad Stu In Other Dept

38390 • Fall 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm BUR 234
show description

Beginning reading course for students preparing to fulfill language requirement for advanced degrees. Emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, and translation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be used to fulfill the undergraduate foreign language requirement.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GER 328 • Advanced German Grammar

38470 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
show description

Course Description:
German 328 is designed to help you refine your command and understanding of German grammar.  The course focuses primarily on formal accuracy, but class activities will include communicative applications of grammatical points.  German 328 is not a course in composition, conversation, or stylistics, although there are elements of such courses in German 328.  (The department offers other courses dedicated to these topics.)  You must have completed second year German here at UT or have earned credit for second year German through a placement exam, AP exam, or transfer credit to enroll in German 328.

Texts/Readings:

-Frank E. Donahue, Deutsche Wiederholungsgrammatik (required)
-A German-English dictionary of your choice

Grading/Requirements:
Tests (4 x 20%):     80%
Participation:         20%

Tests:
Four tests will be given over the course of the semester.  Tests typically cover four or more chapters of the textbook and consist of items similar to those on the homework assignments and in-class exercises.  Each test is worth 20% of your semester grade. Because the tests are increasingly cumulative, there is no final exam in this class.

Participation:

Participation includes attendance, asking questions, answering questions, and taking part in class discussions.  Attendance is crucial.  Unexcused absences will result in poor grades for participation!  Please notify the instructor as soon as possible if it is necessary for you to be absent from class.  In accordance with UT policy, you may be excused from class to participate in religious observances and official obligations like club or varsity sports.  In such cases, written documentation must be presented to the instructor at least one week before the absence takes place.

GER 398T • Supervised Teaching In German

38135 • Fall 2012
Meets M 400pm-700pm BUR 232
show description

This course goes far beyond the obligatory teaching methods course offered by many foreign language departments to incoming graduate students and instructors. GER 398T has two objectives:

(1) The first objective of the course is to (re)introduce approaches to teaching a foreign language and their theoretical backgrounds. It is designed both for graduate students who have never had the opportunity to teach a second language before and for graduate students who come to UT with teaching experience. The course will help participants to develop and refine their theoretical understanding of underlying principles of the learning and teaching of second languages, as well as practical skills to use in everyday second language teaching.

(2) The second objective is to socialize beginning graduate students as language professionals. Participants will develop a critical understanding of the professional debates that relate to college teaching in foreign language departments in the United States. This will give graduate students early in their career the opportunity to start developing a competitive professional profile as future college teacher of foreign languages and cultures.   

The course is structured in three phases:

Phase 1: During the summer, participants will work with eight modules of the website “Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://www.coerll.utexas.edu/methods/) that introduces learners to the following topics: Speaking, Writing, Listening, Reading, Vocabulary, Grammar, Pragmatics, Assessment.

Phase 2: During a workshop before the beginning of the semester, students will discuss the content of the eight modules and design and critique teaching materials based on the principles introduced in the eight modules.

Phase 3: During the fall semester, the class will meet every two weeks for 3 hours. Students will prepare for the meetings by reading articles, reports, and chapters. In addition, students will work towards a teaching portfolio and formulate a teaching philosophy that will integrate ideas and content from all three phases.

Materials

“Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/methods/)

Articles and chapters will be announced in the beginning of the semester made available via a course website throughout the semester.

Grading

50%     Informed and active class participation

20%     Group presentations, facilitation of class discussions, and discussion questions

30%     Teaching portfolio (teaching materials & philosophy of teaching statement)

GER 397P • Course Dsgn In Frgn Lang Disps

38045 • Spring 2012
Meets M 400pm-700pm BUR 234
show description

Description

This seminar provides a learning environment where graduate students can concentrate on the development of essential professional skills while getting more familiar with theoretical models of teaching and learning in higher education and curricular debates in the foreign language disciplines. The course is not only geared towards graduate students with a concentration in applied linguistics. Graduate students with a primary focus in theoretical/historical linguistics, literature, or cultural studies, who want to establish a secondary emphasis in pedagogy, are also encouraged to participate. Throughout the semester, we will discuss issues related to teaching and learning in the humanities in general, and course design in foreign language disciplines in particular. These topics will be addressed though reading assignments, class discussions, student presentations, field work, guest presentations, and the analysis of instructional materials. The primary focus of this course will be the development of a detailed course syllabus and a variety of related course materials that reflect principles of adult learning and current professional guidelines, such as the 2007 MLA report and the ACTFL Standards. Graduate students will develop skills that will enable them to design effective courses and to reflect on a variety of pedagogical and curricular issues in cultural studies, literature, linguistics, applied linguistics, and language teaching.  

Course Materials

There will be 4-6 articles/chapters each week that address topics such as

  • Course design in humanities in general and language disciplines in particular
  • cognitive and affective theories of (adult) learning,
  • content-based language instruction,
  • culture in foreign language teaching,
  • development of critical literacy skills and critical thinking,
  • professional debates on teaching and learning in the humanities,
  • professional guidelines, and ways to transfer their underlying principles to a variety of subject areas,           
  • program development, curriculum development, and
  • assessment

Grading

Active and informed class participation: 45%

Presentations: 10%

Three critical response papers: 15%

Final project: 30%          

GER 398T • Supervised Teaching In German

38110 • Fall 2011
Meets M 400pm-700pm BUR 228
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce approaches to teaching a foreign language (L2) and their theoretical backgrounds.  This course will help successful participants you develop an understanding of underlying principles of learning and teaching, as well as practical skills to use in everyday L2 teaching. It will also help you to develop a critical understanding of the professional debates and career opportunities that relate to language teaching in the United States. We will discuss topics such as

-teaching L2 speaking, listening, reading and writing, 

-communicative L2 teaching and learning,

-the role(s) of grammar in a communicative L2 classroom,

-teaching L2 pragmatics

-vocabulary acquisition

-traditional and alternative ways of language assessment,

-ways of teaching culture, including intercultural competence and cultural analysis,

-the role of technology and online-teaching materials in L2 pedagogy,

-professional debates and controversies regarding the teaching of foreign languages at American universities,

-career opportunities for foreign language educators.

Course Structure:

The course is structured in three phases:

Phase 1: During the summer, participants will work with eight modules of the website “Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/methods/) that introduces learners to the following topics: Speaking, Writing, Listening, Reading, Vocabulary, Grammar, Pragmatics, Assessment.

Phase 2: During the pre-semester orientation, students will further discuss the content of the eight modules and design and critic teaching materials the articulate the principles introduced.

Phase 3: During the fall semester, the class will meet every two weeks for 3 hours to develop a critical understanding of the professional debates and career opportunities that relate to language teaching in the United States. Students will prepare for the meets by reading articles, reports, and chapters. In addition, students will work towards a teaching portfolio that will articulate ideas and content from all three phases.

Requirements:

In order to get the most out of this course, it is essential that learners complete the online modules, prepare for each class meeting by reading the texts carefully, and participate actively during in-class discussions. My role in the classroom is limited to that of a moderator and facilitator. I neither can nor want to dominate the classroom by assuming an expert status. My goal is to foster a group dynamic where we collectively construct insights based on the readings, on our personal experiences as teachers and learners, and on our critical thinking skills. You will quickly realize that like most of my colleagues in the humanities I am intrigued by open-ended reflective questions that we as a group can debate. In contrast, I often remain unsatisfied by quick consensuses, final answers, and cookie-cutter solutions to pedagogical problems.

 

TEXTS

(1) “Foreign Language Teaching Methods” (http://tltc.la.utexas.edu/methods/)

(2) Articles and chapters are identified on the syllabus and will be made available throughout the semester.

 

GRADING

  • 40% Informed and active class participation                                          
  • 20% Quiz                                                                
  • 10% Group presentations, facilitation of class discussions, and discussion questions          
  • 30% Teaching portfolio (teaching materials & philosophy of teaching statement)          

Informed and active class participation  (40%)

Attendance in German 398T is mandatory. In a graduate course much of the information is contributed by the students themselves and generated through interaction of the course participants. Please come prepared each day to discuss the material from the textbook, apply the information to your own teaching and share with your peers what works in the classroom and what does not. You are expected to have read the assigned material prior to coming to class; while you do not have to turn in written assignments, take careful notes on the tasks listed in the syllabus to facilitate a meaningful in-class discussion.    

 

Quiz (20%)

On the first day of the orientation (Phase 2), students will take a quiz that relates to the content of the online materials.

Group presentations, facilitation of class discussions, and discussion questions (10%)

At the beginning of most class periods, you will present in groups the essence of the readings and facilitate the class discussion. To this end, you will generate discussion questions and/or a “Thesenpapier” (statements the stimulate discussions). It is not necessary the purpose of the discussion to generate final answers to these questions, but they will help us to approach the issues at stake. Groups have to electronically hand in their discussion questions and/or the “Thesenpapier” the night before the class meeting.

Teaching portfolio (40%) (Final project)

The teaching portfolio consists of materials that serve practical purposes.  The components of the portfolio are 1) teaching materials, 2)  a philosophy of teaching statement.  By submitting these items, you will get feedback from me and you will develop the skills necessary for reflective teaching. The materials (both teaching and assessment) you include must be tasks that you yourself design, try out in class and can describe in a reflective paragraph on why it worked or did not work.  In the long run, having a complete teaching portfolio -- which you will have to revise and over the span of your teaching career -- serves a practical purpose: such portfolios are not only commonly asked of job candidates, they also help faculty at many institutions to document their teaching excellence for tenure and promotion.  

Teaching materials

You have to design activities (activity sets) that teach reading, writing, speaking, listening, pragmatics, grammar and culture (one activity for each skill/area). You need to include all relevant materials, such as handouts, warm-up and review activities, etc. and a reflective paragraph describing the choices you made in your design (e.g., explain WHY you designed the activity that you did – refer to theories we discuss or you read in the chapters or give rationales you learned from the modules).

Statement of Teaching Philosophy                                                                                                  

In 1-2 pages (max.) describe your beliefs about language learning and teaching, about your roles as instructor, about your views on teaching culture, the four skills, authentic materials, etc. (you do not have to mention all of these items, just what you consider important). Hint:  If you only have 1-2 pages to “make a case for yourself” (persuade the hiring department that they should choose you), what do you really want them to read? 

 

There are no ‘incompletes’ given in this course, unless in the case of documented medical emergencies.

GER 397P • Transcultural Literacy

38255 • Spring 2011
Meets M 400pm-700pm BUR 234
show description

BACKGROUND

Over the past 15 years, both language and literature experts have questioned the effectiveness of the sequential structure of the conventional collegiate foreign language curriculum that strictly segregates the lower-division language classroom from upper-division literature/cultural studies learning environments. The basic research that initiated this development towards an integrated curriculum was published in the first half of the 1990s and introduced a more nuanced understanding of cultural literacy to the profession. This stimulated an avalanche of culture-centered, literacy-oriented second language research. The development towards an integrated language/culture curriculum achieved a recent climax with the publication of the MLA Report Foreign Language and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World (MLA Ad Hoc Committee on Foreign Languages, 2007). This document endorses a curriculum that fosters transcultural and translingual development and that is committed to both linguistic and cultural development at all stages of the undergraduate curriculum. In this seminar, we will directly address the topic of one of the most important concepts in current professional debates regarding the future of collegiate foreign language education in North America. Specifically, we will critically examine the concept of ‘transcultural literacy’ by gaining a robust background in L2 reading research and through contextualizing L2 reading within a variety of theoretical landscapes. In the second half of the semester, we will use these insights to design learning environments.

THEORETICAL MODULE

First, we will raise fundamental questions concerning the (L2) reading process and the status of (literary) reading in collegiate foreign language education: ‘What is reading (comprehension)?’, ‘How is it taught?’, ‘What are the differences between L1 and L2 reading (instruction)? -- as well as -- ‘What are the differences between literary and non-literary reading?’ and ‘How can we model the reading process of literary texts in a second language?’. Whereas the first three questions can be tackled through methods and insights developed by educational linguistics and psychologists, the latter two questions require theoretical approaches that are located outside the “applied linguistics canon”. Therefore, in the second part of this module, we will examine a variety of critical theories that provide a more nuanced understanding of the interaction between recipient and artwork across cultural and linguistic differences. We will discuss how insights from Hermeneutics, in particular Hans-Georg Gadamer’s concept of fusion of horizons, and reader-response theory (Stanley Fish, Wolfgang Iser) can help framing the literary reading processes in L1 contexts and can be used to theorize comprehension processes in second language contexts. These and other literary theories have clearly influenced recent recalibrations of advanced foreign language teaching.  . In the third part of the theoretical module, we will trace the shift from ‘intercultural awareness’ to ‘transcultural literacy’ and critically evaluate the work of Clair Kramsch, a scholar closely associated with this development, and question the theoretical robustness and practicality of their approaches.  

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MODULE  

During the second module, graduate students will apply the theoretical insights gained in the first half of the course to learning environments at all levels of the 4-year undergraduate FL program. Specifically, they will critical analyze existing foreign language curricula, course designs, instructional materials, and teaching approaches and assess to what degree theses discourses have (not) been informed by the theoretical scholarship and contribute to the development of transcultural literacy. Students will learn how to modify existing materials so that they address more specifically the objective of transcultural literacy. Finally, graduate students will have the opportunity to didactize cultural materials for beginning, intermediate, advanced stages of the undergraduate curriculum. There are two rationales for these ‘hands-on’ activities in the second half of the semester: Graduate students will not only create a body of materials that they can use in current and future classrooms and for their teaching portfolia, they will also develop a more critical view of the concept of ‘transcultural literacy’, experience the limitations of this approach. This criticality will qualify them to further push the development of transcultural theory in future. Although the class is primarily geared towards issues in collegiate FL education, students with a background or research interest in primary and secondary education are strongly encouraged to develop materials that are relevant for these contexts.

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING POLICY

*Weekly reactions to the readings (250-500 words): 20%

*Presentations: 20%

*Participation: 20%   

*Final project (three options): 40%

(1) A theoretical research paper that uses critical/literary theory and applies it to an educational discourse in culture-centered FL education.

(2) A theoretical research paper that uses (educational) linguistic theory and applies it to an educational discourse in culture-centered collegiate FL education.

(3) A substantial body of instructional materials (course designs, didactizations,    activities, assignment, assessment instruments) that are based on the principles discussed in the course and accompanied by reflective statements.

LANGUAGE

Since this class is geared to attract graduate students from a variety of departmental and linguistic backgrounds, all readings and classroom discussions will be conducted in English. Instructional materials developed for the instruction in languages other than English must be accompanied by short translations or explanations, so that they are assessable for all course participants. Theoretical research papers must be written in English, and permission to write in German will only granted in exceptional cases.

Readings

Elizabeth Bernhardt. (2011). Understanding Advanced Second Language Reading. New York: Routledge.

William Grabe. (2009). Reading in a Second Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Janet Swaffar & Katherine Arens. (2005). Remapping the Foreign Language Curriculum. New York: MLA.

Claire Kramsch: The Multilingual Subject. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Articles/Chapters by: Goodman, Gough, Stanovic, Kintsch, Cummins, Steffenson, Bernhardt/Berman, Pressley, Beck, Byrnes, Donato/Brooks, Fecteau, Zyzik/Polio, Gadamer, Schleiermacher, Iser, Fish, Jauss, Bhabha.

 

GER 398T • Supervised Teaching In German

37915 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 234
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to some theories of second language acquisition (SLA) and foreign language (L2) teaching approaches to help prepare you for teaching German in the classroom.  This course should help you develop practical skills to use in everyday teaching and an understanding of why certain approaches to teaching might work better than other in different L2 learning contexts. We will discuss topics such as communicative L2 teaching and learning, SLA theories, traditional and alternative ways of language assessment, cognitive, personal and situational variables affecting SLA outcomes, the role of grammar teaching in a communicative FL classroom, situating culture in L2 pedagogy, among other issues.  In order to get the most out of this course, it is essential that you read the assigned chapters thoroughly, and participate actively during in-class discussions.  Rarely will there be lectures; instead, your readings, experiences, materials and other written homework will provide most of the content for the course. You will have to evaluate your own and other’s teaching in the framework of communicative L2 pedagogy.  What you learn in this course is closely related to your classroom teaching.

Readings
Omaggio-Hadley, Alice. 2000.  Teaching Language in Context.    (3rd edition). Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle.

Supplementary readings available from course Blackboard website

Grading
Class participation & Web-discussions                              20%
Observation reports                                                       10%
Presentation of teaching approach / method                     10%
Presentation of current pedagogical article                       10%
Written examination (mid-term and final exams)              20%
Teaching portfolio (teaching philosophy, lesson plans,        30%        
                  teaching materials & self-review video)

                                            

GER 328 • Advanced German Grammar

38050 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm RLM 6.112
show description

Course Description:

German 328 has two goals: (1) This learning environment is primarily designed to help you refine your command and understanding of German grammar.  The course focuses on formal accuracy, but class activities will include communicative applications of grammatical points. (2) In addition to the supplement grammar content, the course will include a module that is designed to help you to acquire linguistic and intercultural skills that are relevant for a study abroad or work experience in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. The module is more experimental in nature, and most of its content will be located in a collaborative Wiki environment.

 

Texts/Readings:

-Frank E. Donahue, Deutsche Wiederholungsgrammatik (available at www.amazon.com for $48.75)

-A German-English dictionary of your choice

-Blackboard site (primarily for communication)

-Wiki course site

 

GER 312K • Sec-Yr Ger I: Read Hmn/Soc Sci

38355 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 JES A303A
show description

Welcome to German 312K! German 312K is a third semester course for students who have completed GER 507 at UT Austin (with a grade C or better) or who have been advised to take it as a result of the UT German Placement Exam. This course continues where GER 507 left off. The course will help you develop reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and strategies with activities both inside and outside of class. It will also guide you further into learning about the cultures of the German-speaking countries. German 312K is a three-credit course that meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

Publications

See curriculum vitae 

bottom border