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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Course Descriptions

GOV 310L • American Government

37755 • Lamm, Jennifer E.
Meets TTH 800am-930am WAG 420
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This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

37760 • Prindle, David
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.306
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Statement of Purpose

 

                        The purpose of this course is not only to provide useful information and a point of view with which to understand politics in the state and the nation.  I am an explicitly normative teacher; that is, I try to supply students with the ideal of a democratic polity as well as the reality of the system, in order that they may compare the reality with the ideal and evaluate the results.  In other words, I hope to help my students become better citizens.

 

Prerequisites

 

            Students must have one semester’s worth of credit before they are allowed to enroll for this class.  That is, a freshman can enroll, but not until after his or her first semester at UT.

 

Assigned Reading

 

American Government and Politics Today, 2012-2013 Brief ed. by Steffen Schmidt,       

    Mack Shelley, and Barbara Bardes

 

Texas Politics, 12th ed., by Charldean Newell, David Prindle, and James Riddlesperger

 

    There is a variety of ways to purchase these two books:

 

    1. In printed form, they are available as a “streamlined custom text” at the Co-op. This single volume consists of selected chapters from the two textbooks that are substantially discounted. You can also buy the whole printed books off the Cengage Website, but

you will pay more than for the custom package at the Co-op.

   2. Virtually, they are available as e-books on the Cengage Publisher Website.  This way is substantially cheaper than buying the paper copy.

 

 

Grading Policy

 

            There are three tests in this class, the score on each of which, in general, counts one third of your grade.  For a few students, I may make some minor adjustments in these averages to reflect class participation. Here are the average numerical grades, and their corresponding letter grades:

A:              92.3 or higher

A minus:   90 to 92

B plus:      88 to 89.7

B:              82.3 to 87.7

B minus:   80 to 82

C plus:      78 to 79.7

C:              62.3 to 77.7

C minus:    60 to 62

D:              50 to 59.7

F:               Below 50

 

            People who have missed one or more of the three assignments, in addition to those who average below 50, will receive an “F.”  I may make some minor adjustments in these averages to reflect class participation.

GOV 310L • American Government

37770 • O'toole, Daniel
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ B0.306
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This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

37775 • Ofek, Hillel
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 1.102
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

37780 • Meyer, John
Meets MW 300pm-430pm UTC 3.122
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

37795 • McDaniel, Eric
Meets MW 830am-1000am
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

37796 • Shafran, JoBeth
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.104
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

37797 • McIver, John
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.102
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Hon

37798 • Roberts, Brian
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.210
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Iss & Policies Amer Gov-Ut/Dc

37799 • RICHTER, BRIAN
Meets
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37800 • Price, Jessica
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ B0.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37810 • O'Brien, Shannon Bow
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CAL 100
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Issues and Policies:

Grades will based on the following:

Test 1              20% 
Test 2                          25% 
Test 3                          25% 


Online Ethics Assignments: 30%

 

Course Description:

This course is the second 3 hours for American government.  My specialty area is American Presidency.  The American Presidency can be taught in a number of ways.  This semester, I have selected to teach the class through a historical approach.  The presidency has changed in many dramatic and significant ways since its inception.  If Barack Obama (with all his presidential powers) were to suddenly be dropped into 1789, the citizens of the day would be shocked at the amount of presidential power he wields.  However, as citizens of the 21st century, most do not consider the size and scope of the presidency to be unreasonable.  In fact, though some people think he has too much power, many others would be willing to grant him greater authority.

 

In short, the office of the presidency acted and reacted to changes in politics and society. This course will start with George Washington and end with Barack Obama.  While I will likely touch on every administration, we can break them into specific eras for study.  Changes in the presidency result from tumultuous events (e.g., Garfield’s assassination helped spur the creation of the civil service system in federal government) which lead to governmental growth.  This is not a history course where we will learn in detail about every administration.  However, we can use history to better understand why certain eras of presidency are forgettable and others unforgettable. I do not expect you to be well versed on American history (if you are getting worried) because we are looking at how the presidency drives history.  The core point of most topics in this class will revolve around: How was the presidency changed?  How did the presidency change society?  How did the presidency increase or decrease in power? 

 

Required Textbooks: TBD

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37815 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
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Kurt Weyland

 

 

GOV 312L/unique 37815: Issues & Policies in American Government: The U.S. in Comparative Perspective

 

Course description:

 

This course will compare the U.S. political system with that of Great Britain, Sweden, Russia/Soviet Union, and Mexico in order to analyze how different models of democracy as well as non-democratic types of political regime operate in practice and how they have changed over time. Specifically, we will examine liberal democracy (the case of the U.S.); social democracy (Sweden); the move from social to liberal democracy (Great Britain); Communist totalitarianism (Soviet Union), its move toward democratization, and the slide into authoritarian rule (Russia); authoritarian rule & its democratization (Mexico). In this way, the course will examine political decision-making in different institutional settings and analyze how these political differences affect public policies and the lives of common citizens.

 

 

Grading:

 

3 examinations + 3 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance norm. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty rules.

 

 

Texts:

David Held, Models of Democracy, 3rd ed. (Polity Press, 2006)

 

Benjamin Ginsberg & Martin Shefter, Politics by Other Means, 3rd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2002)

 

M. Donald Hancock et al., eds., Politics in Europe: An Introduction to the Politics of the United Kingdom, ... Sweden, Russia,.. 5th ed. (Congressional Quarterly Press, 2011/12). [NOTE: We will use the 5th edition so students can obtain used copies; the 6th edition (2014) is very expensive].

 

Daniel Levy & Kathleen Bruhn, Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development, 2nd ed. (Univ. California Press, 2006).

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37825 • Givens, Terri
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GSB 2.126
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Government 312L: Issues and Policies in American Government (#37825)

COMPARATIVE IMMIGRATION POLITICS

 

Recent Congressional debates over immigration have highlighted the varying approaches that politicians would like to take in order to control the flow of immigrants into the United States.  One can argue that the attacks of September 11th brought the issues surrounding immigration to the fore, unlike any other event in the last century.  Other attacks such as the Madrid bombings, the murder of Theo Van Gogh, the London bombings and the Paris “riots” (aka “uprising”) have also highlighted issues of immigration and integration. In the last decade countries around the world have had to examine the ways that they secure their borders and control the flow of people in and out of their country.  In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows which are often considered necessary to economic security?

 

The course will begin with an examination of immigration law and policy in the United States.  Other issues to be covered include the economics of immigration, refugees and asylum seekers, and security issues since September 11th.  A comparative approach will be used to provide a counterpoint to the U.S. case, as well as to examine the international forces which underpin migration flows.

 

TEXTS

 

Daniel Tichenor, Dividing Lines:  The Politics of Immigration Control in America

Givens, Freeman and Leal, Immigration Policy and Security:  U.S. European and Commonwealth Perspectives

 

Other texts will be available online or via Canvas.

 

GRADING and ASSIGNMENTS

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the U.S. and other parts of the world, particularly Europe.  Students will be provided with the historical background and information on specific issues needed to analyze current immigration policy, and describe the arguments for and against particular policies. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

 

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings, to attend lecture, participate in class discussions, and to complete ALL assignments.  There will be two exams and a final written project which will be a 3-4 page paper describing a way to reform some aspect of U.S. immigration policy. 

 

The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

 

Exam 1                                                                                                            20%

Exam 2                                                                                                            20%

Weekly assignments                                                                                       20%

In-class assignments & Participation                                                              20%

Final Project                                                                                                    20%

Total                                                                                                               100%

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37830 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WEL 1.308
show description

 

Required Reading

 

Randolph B. Campbell, Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, 2012 (paperback)

 

Description

 

This course will examine the major events and personalities in Texas political history from 16th century Spanish Texas up to the present. We will adopt a narrative approach, stressing the issues and concerns that motivated the major actors who helped shape the history of this state and also seeing events in Texas in the larger context of European, Mexican, and American history.

 

Exams and Grades

 

There will be three in-class, multiple-choice exams on the dates noted below. There is no final exam. The first two exams have 35 questions and the last one has 30 questions for a total of 100 questions on all three exams.  The raw scores on the three exams are added and the total raw scores are then used to determine your final grade. 100-87 = A, 86-85 = A-, 84-83 = B+, 82-77 = B, 76-75 = B-, 74-73 = C+, 72-66 = C, 65-64 = C-, 63-54 = D, 53-0 = F. There is no extra credit. A make-up exam (IDs and short answer questions) will be given only if an exam is missed for a valid reason. Each exam covers only material since the exam just before it.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37840 • Moser, Robert
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37843 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37844 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WAG 101
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America and the Cold War

 

Instructor: Prof. Barany                          

Office: Batts 3.156                                  

Office hours: M/W: 1:30-3                        

 

The Cold War lasted for nearly five decades spanning most of the second half of the Twentieth Century and had a major impact on the lives of virtually everyone in that period, including the generations of your parents and grand parents.  What were the origins of the Cold War?  Who were its main protagonists?  What were the most important events and how did they impact upon the final outcome?  Obviously the U.S. and the Soviet Union were the main protagonists but the side stories – developments in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, the Middle East signified an important backdrop to the contest between the two nuclear superpowers that must be kept in mind.   

 

The objective of this course is to familiarize beginning undergraduate students with the main actors, events, and developments and to stimulate an appreciation of the complexities and nuances of international politics of this important era that continues to have a major impact on contemporary world politics.  At the end of the semester you will be able to intelligently discuss the political history of U.S.-Soviet relations and the Cold War in all major world regions.  We will begin with a thorough examination of the Cold War’s origins and then follow events, mostly through the eyes of American presidents from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to George Bush, Sr.  The disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991 is the course’s end-point.

 

There are three non-cumulative midterm exams, weekly pop quizzes, and a group video project (a five-minute film about a key event, personality, or aspect of the Cold War that you will create in a group of four or five students).  In addition, students have the option of reviewing a book that was previously cleared with the Instructor or the TA.  The book review should be between no more than four (4) double-spaced pages and must be a critical assessment of the volume not a summary.

 

Grading:

 

Midterm 1:          20                         15

Midterm 2:           20                         15

Midterm 3:          30                          25

10 pop quizzes:  20                         20

Film project:       10                          10

                                                             é

If taking the book review option:   15

 

Assigned book:

 

John Lewis Gaddis, The Cold War: A New History (New York: Penguin Press, 2005)

GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

37845 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 420
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GOV 312P: America’s Constitutional Principles

 

Prerequisites: GOV 310 or equivalent

 

Description:

 

This class is a study of the basic principles of American political life: Democracy, equality, and liberty.  Through a close reading of core texts of the American political tradition, we will attempt to see how these ideals took hold in the US, what arguments were made on their behalf, and what possible pitfalls there are for a society dedicated to those ideals.  

 

The course will proceed almost entirely through a close reading of primary sources. The class will begin with a study of the philosophic foundations of the American system of government by reading John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government. It will then explore the debate over the ratification of the Constitution, examining in detail the arguments made in its favor by the Federalists and those made against it by the Anti-Federalists, in order to see concretely how our political principles were put into practice, and to come to a better appreciation of the deep disagreements about the nature and purposes of our political system that were present even at the time of the Founding.

 

The class will then turn to a study of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, which is perhaps the most penetrating analysis of democracy ever written.  Basing his claims on careful observation of American society, Tocqueville presents a new interpretation of what democracy is and what its virtues and vices are.  He further raises the basic question of how – and whether - a democratic society can remain healthy and politically free in the long term. In reading his work, we will focus on such key issues as the relationship between freedom and equality, the meaning of justice in a democracy, the moral character of American citizens, and the threat of a decline in civic involvement. 

 

This class will also include an extensive unit on the history of race relations and ethnic diversity in American society, and how these phenomena force us to rethink America’s founding principles. We will be looking at core texts that address questions about how African Americans could become true citizens after the era of slavery. We will also ask what the proper role of race is in a society dedicated to universal, natural rights. We’ll focus especially on the thought of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass and on the debate between Booker T. Washington and WEB DuBois over integration in the time after Reconstruction. We will also read important statements by Augustus Washington, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin.

 

 

Grading Rubric:

 

Two medium length papers: 50% of final grade

Final exam: 30% of final grade

Quizzes, attendance, participation, and short writing assignments: 20% of final grade

 

Texts:

 

Course Reader

The Federalist Papers

The Anti-Federlist (abridged)

Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

GOV 314 • Latino Pol:voter Id/Health/Edu

37861 • Rivera, Michael
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CMA 3.114
(also listed as MAS 319)
show description

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the research design and methods used in contemporary social science research.  The course will cover the main components of research design, and will provide students with the tools to become capable consumers of social science research.

Students will learn basic methods that can be applied to many disciplines; however, all case studies in this course will focus on literatures in Mexican-American and Latina/o Studies.  Students will also become familiar with the “tools of the trade” in Mexican-American and Latina/o studies.

The primary goal of the course will be to prepare the students to read academic work more critically.  Students will also become familiar with what makes a “good” social science research question.  Questions will include: What’s a hypothesis?  What is a research design?  What is a research method?

 

Requirements and Grading

  • 20%: Class Participation – Participation will be graded on quality of the contributions and knowledge of the weekly readings.  In this course, the quality of analysis is much more important than the quantity of the material covered.
  • 40%: Exam(s):  Students will critique an existing study and will provide recommendations on how the study could be improved.
  • 40%: Final Assignment – Students will construct a research design.  Students will not collect original data, but rather will design a research project, similar to a grant proposal.  This will encourage student to think about future research opportunities (e.g. senior thesis, grad school, etc. )

Required Texts

  • Trochim, William M.K. and James P. Donnelly. 2006. The Research Methods Knowledge Base. 3rd Edition. Mason, OH: Atomic Dog.
  • Babbie, Earl R. The Practice of Social Research. Cengage Learning
  • Other readings will be provided by the Professor.

GOV 314 • Intro To Politics In East Asia

37862 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 101
(also listed as ANS 301M)
show description

 

This lower-division survey course introduces students to the politics and political systems of Japan, China, Taiwan, and North and South Korea.  For each country, we explore key political institutions and processes as well as relevant social and economic themes—all from historical and comparative perspectives. As the semester unfolds, students will acquire insights into many of the issues and questions that have intrigued scholars of East Asian politics, including East Asian models of economic development, regional paths to democracy and the legacies of strong states, and the nature of state-society relations. By the end of the semester, students will have acquired the background knowledge not only to interpret current events in East Asia, but also to pursue more in-depth scholarly study of this critically important part of the world.

 

Grading Criteria:

 

1. Quizzes on readings (approximately 8):                        15%

            2. Two in-class midterm exams (20% + 25%)       45%

*Students may write a short research paper

 in lieu of the 2nd midterm

            3. Final exam:                                                     40%

           

 

Texts:

           

            Tomohito Shinoda, Contemporary Japanese Politics: Institutional Changes and Power Shifts (Columbia University Press, 2013).

 

            Charles K. Armstrong, The Koreas, 2nd ed. (Routledge 2013).

 

            Kenneth Lieberthal, Governing China: From Revolution to Reform, 2nd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2003)

           

            Additional readings will be provided to students at the beginning of the semester via Canvas.

GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

37863 • Fallis, Lewis
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CBA 4.344
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independance, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.

GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

37864 • Helfer, Ariel
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.106
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independance, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.

GOV 314 • Street Justice:morals/The Wire

37865 • Marshall, Stephen H
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WRW 102
(also listed as AFR 317D, AMS 315, CTI 310)
show description

This lower-division large lecture course will examine the moral and philosophical dilemmas behind the concept of “justice” for Black, inner city communities in the United States, using Baltimore, MD in the popular TV program “The Wire” as a case study. Students will be expected to define the ethical subjects in real-world moral dilemmas surrounding justice, using introductions to political science, philosophy, and intellectual history as a structural guide (with special considerations of Critical Race Theory and Black Studies in their analyses).

Students will be asked to think critically about the complicated concepts of justice in inner-city communities, as exemplified in “The Wire”. Students will be invited to apply their understandings of morality and justice to not only the fictional situations in this case study, but also to ethical decisions in historical, race-related cases in Black United States history, such as Jim Crow, the Civil Rights movement, and modern-day Drug Wars. It is hoped that this course helps to parse out what is considered “right” and what is considered “wrong” when analyzing the concept of justice.

GOV 314 • Intro M East: Adj/Chg Mod Tm

37869 • Di-Capua, Yoav
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm CAL 100
(also listed as HIS 306N, MES 301L)
show description

This is an introductory class to the history of the Middle East in the 20th century. The main question for consideration is which forces and what sort of developments transformed this region from a relatively peaceful region to a radicalized environment and a source for opposition against the “West.” By exploring critical political, social, intellectual and economic themes such as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, the impact of Zionism and military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women and the oil revolution, we would identify the main internal and external forces, as well as the critical processes, that shaped the region during the last century.

 

Texts:

·        James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East; A History (Oxford: Oxford 

                 University Press, 2004).

·        James Gelvin, The Israel-Palestine Conflict : One Hundred Years of War 

                  (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).

GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

37873 • BURNS, DANIEL E
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CBA 4.344
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

Instructor: Kim Burns

 

In this course we will be studying some classic texts of the history of Western political thought. The guiding themes of our readings are money and economy. We begin by asking what the purpose of government is, whether it is making happy or virtuous citizens, preserving freedom and equality, or increasing peace and prosperity. We will attempt to discover whether the economy can make it easier or harder for us to be happy, virtuous, equal, free, or peaceful. If we find that the economy can help or hinder the achievement of the ends of politics, we must then ask what the government should do about the economy: does the government have a right, or duty, to control economic activity? We will be exploring these questions in the writings of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Montesquieu, Locke, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and Friedrich Hayek.

 

The purpose of this course is to discover the origins of, and alternatives to, our own opinions about society, politics and economics. Our primary task, therefore, is to attempt to understand the positions and arguments put forward in our texts. Students will also be encouraged to critically assess the authors' arguments, and to look for ways these texts might provide us with insight into the political and economic issues of our own day.

 

Grades will be based on quizzes, class participation, reading responses, a paper, a mid-term and final exam. Students are expected to come to class prepared to answer questions on the day's reading. Poorly written papers will receive worse grades than well written ones. Exams will evaluate how well students have understood and retained the positions and arguments of the course texts.

GOV 314 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

37874 • BURNS, DANIEL E
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 201
(also listed as CTI 302)
show description

This course is a survey of some of the most important texts in the history of Western political and economic thought. We will read works from classical Athens through the 20th century that all treat questions like the following: What is government for? What makes a good law? What are the advantages and disadvantages of democracy compared to other forms of government? What are our responsibilities to our government? How do we know if our government is meeting its responsibilities to us? What role, if any, does government have in shaping the character of its citizens? What role should the government play in shaping the economy? How can the economy make it harder or easier for us to lead happier lives?

 

Students will survey the range of answers that different authors have given to these questions and will be encouraged to come to their own conclusions about who is most persuasive. Although this is primarily a course in political and economic theory, we will always be looking out for the ways that the classic debates we study still inform the political issues of our own day.

 

Grading will be based on in-class quizzes, a midterm, a final exam, a paper, and class participation. We will be reading excerpts from texts by Aristotle, Aquinas, Montesquieu, Locke, Adam Smith, Rousseau, Marx, Keynes, and Hayek.

GOV 320K • US Const Devel: Structures

37875 • Sager, Alan M
Meets MW 300pm-430pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Government 320K                                                                                  American Constitutional Development I

Spring 2015                                                                                                                        Dr. Sager

                                                                                               

 

Course Description

            This course is an overview of American Constitutional Development.  Through an analysis of U.S. Supreme Court decisions, we will study the development of the Constitution from the Marshall Court to the Rehnquist Court.  This course focuses on what are called constitutional structures and processes.  Topics include the development of judicial, executive and legislative power, federalism,  substantive due process, and property rights  and takings under the 5th amendment.

            To deepen our insights into the development of the Constitution, in addition to case materials,  the course will utilize video and audio materials which include oral argument in the U.S. Supreme Court, histories and reenactments of famous cases, and brief biographies of current  and past Supreme Court Justices. 

            There are four major goals for this course:

            1. To identify the major historical themes and controversies about our Constitution

            2. To better understand Constitutionalism and  our Constitution;  what  our Constitution is and  is not and how it  may have changed and developed over the past 200 years.

            3. To develop a high level of skill in  reading, briefing  and understanding Supreme Court opinions, with special attention on what questions to ask when reading an opinion   Part of this skill includes being able to see and understand the point of view of the person writing an opinion.

            4. To raise participants' "cultural literacy"  with regard to  our Constitution, and the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

            To fulfill these goals, some of the questions we will attempt to answer include:

            1. What is a Constitution supposed to do and who is supposed to interpret it?

            2.  What difference, if any does the context in which the  Constitution was created matter and how much should               it matter?

           3. What differences, if any, have existed among the justices as to what the Constitution means?

           4. How do various justices go about interpreting the Constitution? What accounts for their differences? In other  words, what are the various theories of constitutional interpretation?

            5. What impact does the Court and Constitution have on American society.?

 

To answer these questions, we will discuss each of the assigned cases.  These cases provide the data for fashioning answers to these questions and for moving us toward the course goals.

 

Tenative Grading:                                        Approximate  Weight

3 hour examinations                                        64%(19%, 21%, 24%)

Class participation and preparation               15%(Attendance and preparation) Brief and short paper                                      21%(Brief  9%, paper 12%)

 

 

 

Required Textbooks and Readings:

Lee Epstein and Thomas G. Walker, Constitutional Law For A Changing America: Institutional Powers and Constraints, (6th edition)   

T.R. van Geel, Understanding Supreme Court Opinions, 8th Edition. Bert Folsom, The Myth of the Robber Barons

Bert Folsom,   New Deal, Raw Deal.

 

           

Class Participation               .  The grade on this part consists of the following:

            A. Demonstrating a reasonable level of daily preparation and understanding of the material covered

            B. Contributions made to class discussion and analysis.

            C. Overall attendance. More than 3 unexcused absences can affect your final average by

                        two  or more points.

GOV 321M • Politics In Japan

37878 • Maclachlan, Patricia
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 208
(also listed as ANS 321M)
show description

This upper division course surveys key themes in the domestic politics and political economy of postwar Japan.  After briefly exploring the politics and institutions of the pre-war era, we will examine the impact of the American Occupation (1945-52) on the Japanese political economy, the secrets of Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) dominance in postwar elections, voting trends, legislative and policymaking processes, gender politics, and interest group and social movement politics. We will devote our final weeks to the analysis of developments in contemporary Japan, including the movement toward political-economic reform—particularly in the public sector, defense and agriculture.  These and related topics will be examined from a comparative perspective and with reference to political science theories, most notably historical institutionalism and rational choice.

 

 

Grading Criteria:

 

            1.  Quizzes on readings:                                           15%

            2.  Midterm examination:                                         25%

            3.  Short (5 pages) writing assignment:                    20%

            4.  Final examination:                                              40%

 

 

Texts:

 

1. Robin LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife. University of California Press, 1999.

2. Jacob M. Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns: The Rise and Fall of Japan’s Postwar Political Machine. Sanford University Press, 1999.

            3. Tomohito Shinoda, Contemporary Japanese Politics: Institutional Changes and Power Shifts (Columbia University Press, 2013).

 

            4. Frances Rosenbluth and Michael Thies, Japan Transformed: Political Change and Economic Structuring (Princeton University Press, 2010)

            Additional readings will be provided to students at the beginning of the semester via Canvas.

GOV 324J • Govs/Polit Of Eastern Europe

37879 • Liu, Amy
Meets TTH 800am-930am GAR 3.116
(also listed as EUS 348, REE 335)
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Couse Description

In the past 100 years, the map for “Eastern Europe” has been redrawn more than a dozen times. This course examines the politics behind and the consequences of these border changes. We will begin with the collapse of two empires—the dual monarchy of Austro-Hungary and tsarist Russia—at the end of World War 1. We will then continue on through the Interwar period, World War 2, and the Cold War. We will give special attention to the institutional differences across these otherwise similar-in-ideology “communist states.” We will examine how these differences affected subsequent transitions and government policies toward minorities. We will conclude by looking at how the European Union has redrawn Eastern Europe by opening up borders and the implications of these opened borders.

 

The importance of the Soviet Union in Eastern Europe politics cannot be overstated. To this end, we will study the Soviet Union/Russia briefly, but note that the primary emphasis in this course is on the region to the west of present-day Germany and to the east of present-day Russia. This would include Ukraine.

 

Grading Policy

  • Quizzes: 25%
  • Midterm Examination: 25%
  • Final Examination: 25%
  • Coding Assignment: 25%

 

Texts

  • Bunce, Valerie and Sharon L. Wolchik. 2011. Defeating Authoritarian Leaders in Postcommunist Countries. Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Krenz, Maria. 2009. Made in Hungary: A Life Forged by History. Boulder, CO: Donner Publishing.
  • MacMillan, Margaret. 2003. Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World. Random House Trade Paperbacks.

GOV 324L • Govs & Polit Of Western Europe

37880 • Givens, Terri
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ B0.306
(also listed as EUS 350)
show description

EUROPEAN STUDIES 350 (35765)

GOVERNMENT 324L (37880)

GOVERNMENTS AND POLITICS OF WESTERN EUROPE

 

 

Course Description

Europe has experienced major change since World War II, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to European enlargement, with Croatia increasing the size of the EU to 28 member states. European integration, and ethnic conflict have presented major challenges for the governments of Western Europe. The current fiscal crisis has complicated politics in the EU, and challenged the survival of both the Euro and the broader European project. This course will introduce the governments and politics of countries in Western Europe and a comparative politics approach will be used.

 

What is comparative politics?

Comparative politics is the field within political science that tries to explain why countries vary in their domestic political institutions, their level of political and economic development, and their public policies.  Other fields in political science include international relations, political theory and American politics.

 

Course Requirements

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political institutions of European governments and the European Union.  By the end of the course students will be expected to be able to describe the different types of government institutions and how they impact politics and policy making in Europe. They will also be expected to describe some of the important issues facing European governments, including issues related to immigration, the financial crisis and European enlargement. Student achievement of these goals will be assessed through exams and written assignments as described below.

 

To receive credit for the course, students are required to complete all assigned readings and to attend lecture (the TA will be taking attendance after the first week of class).  Any assignments not completed within a week of the due date will be given a zero.  There will be two exams and weekly assignments.  The overall grading breakdown is as follows:

 

Exam 1                                                            25%

Exam 2                                                            25%

Weekly assignments                                       40%

Participation                                                    10%

Total                                                                100%

 

Plus-Minus grading will be used

 

Texts

Gallagher, Laver and Mair, Representative Government in Modern Europe (Fifth Edition)

John McCormick, Understanding the European Union: A Concise Introduction (The European Union Series), Fifth edition.

GOV 325 • Political Parties

37885 • Shaw, Daron
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PHR 2.110
show description

Course ID:        Government 325

Title:                   Political Parties

Instructor:       Professor Shaw

 

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and consequences associated with American political parties. Initially, we focus on parties from a broad theoretical perspective, and draw on data and information from a variety of countries over a number of years. At about week five, the focus shifts to the United States, and we cover topics such as campaign finance, political machines, realignment, voting and public opinion, parties in government, and polarization. The class will consist of lectures, although participation is expected.

 

Prerequisites

Government 310L and 312L.

 

Books

Hershey, M., Party Politics in America, Longman. 

Ware, A. Political Parties and Party Systems, Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation

Two midterm examinations

Two take-home essays

Attendance and Participation

 

 

Book Orders for Professor Daron Shaw, Government Department (Spring 2015)

 

Government 325 (Political Parties)

1. Hershey, M., Party Politics in America, Longman (16th ed.). Paperback: ISBN-10: 0205992099

2. Ware, A. Political Parties and Party Systems, Oxford University Press. Paperback: ISBN: 019878077X

GOV 330K • The American President

37890 • Buchanan, Bruce
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.130
show description

Course Purpose

 

This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

 

Course Description   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

 

  1. Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

            3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential History

 

B.  Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured?   

 

 

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

 

  1. Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

 

D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

                                                           Student Responsibilities

 

  1. Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)
  2. Combination take-home final/mini-term paper (40% of grade)
  3. Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade—five points--per subsequent absence).

            Note:  Pluses and Minuses will not be used for final course grades.

 

 

                                                               Required Readings

 

 

J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory

37895 • Budziszewski, J.
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CLA 0.106
(also listed as PHL 342)
show description

GOV 335M / PHL 342:

NATURAL LAW THEORY

Professor J. Budziszewski

 

Unique numbers:      Gov unique number 37895, Phl unique number pending

Class meets:              MW 3:30-5:00pm in CLA 0.106

Prof's office hours:   M 12:00-3:00pm in MEZ 3.106

Prof’s email:             jbud@undergroundthomist.org

Prof’s office phone:  232-7229; phone does not record messages; email strongly preferred

Course website:        Blackboard (subject to change)

Prof’s website:          The Underground Thomist, http://www.undergroundthomist.org

 

PREREQUISITES, FLAGS, AND FIELD

 

If the course is taken as Gov 335M, enrollment requires six semester hours of lower-division government; it can also be taken as Phl 342, but seats in that section are limited.  It carries a writing flag and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  Within the Government Department, its field is Political Theory.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

“Natural law” refers to moral law – in particular, the fundamental moral principles that are built into the design of human nature and lie at the roots of conscience.  Natural law thinking is the spine of the Western tradition of jurisprudence.  Historically, it has provided the basis for talking about all of the 'hot button' issues in past and present culture wars; if you wanted to talk about war, slavery, political liberty, or relations between men and women, you talked about natural law.  The distinctive mark of natural law thinking is that it begins from what the mind can know about these things by reasoning alone, rather than by the authority of revelation.  This in no ways denies revelation, for although the earliest natural law thinkers were pagans, the most influential natural law thinkers have been Christians who held that reason and revelation work together.

 

The founders of the American republic believed in the natural law -- in universal and "self-evident" principles of justice and morality which the Declaration of Independence called "the laws of Nature and of Nature's God."   For generations afterward, most Americans took the reality of natural law for granted.  The Declaration of Independence had appealed to it to justify independence; Abraham Lincoln appealed to it to criticize slavery; Martin Luther King appealed to it to criticize racial discrimination.  You would hardly guess any of this from the present day, because belief in natural law has come to be viewed as "politically incorrect."  Nevertheless, the tradition of natural law is experiencing a modest renaissance.

 

Is there really a natural law?  What difference does it make to society and politics if there is?  Is it really "natural"?  Is it really "law"?  To consider these questions, we will read a variety of influential works on natural law from the middle ages to the present.  Probably, most of your liberal arts education has implicitly rejected the whole idea, but in this course, for a change, you have an opportunity to hear the other side.

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

For Unit 1, a required analytical outline (20%).  For Units 2, 3, and 4, take-home essays (20% apiece).  Short-answer quizzes (20%).  Extra credit for analytical outlines for Units 2, 3, and 4 (up to 5 points per unit, added to exam grades).

 

TEXTS

 

Recommended:

 

J. Budziszewski, What We Can't Not Know: A Guide.  On reserve at the Perry-Castaneda Library.  Can be purchased online if you want to have a personal copy.

 

J. Budziszewski, Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Treatise on Law.  Electronic resource available through Perry-Castaneda Library.  Can be purchased online if you want to have a personal copy.

 

J. Budziszewski, Companion to the Commentary.  Free online resource available through the Resource link at the Cambridge University Press catalogue page for the Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Treatise on Law.

 

Required:

 

C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of ManOn reserve at the Perry-Castaneda Library.  Also online at https://archive.org/details/TheAbolitionOfMan_229 .

 

Thomas Aquinas, Treatise on Law.  Available online at http://www.newadvent.org/summa/2.htm (scroll down to LAW, and read Questions 90-97, entire, and 105, Article 1 only).

 

Readings packet.  Available for purchase at the UT Copy Center, McCombs 3.136, phone: 471-8281.  McCombs is the Business School building, right behind Mezes Hall.

 

Additional online readings listed on the Contents page of the readings packet.

 

UNITS

 

Unit 1:  Introduction to the Concept

Unit 2:  The Classical Synthesis

Unit 3:  The American Reception of Natural Law Tradition

Unit 4:  Contemporary Writing by Natural Law Theorists

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

37900 • Edwards, David
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.216
show description

 

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire. Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

The Readings

 

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Coop

(and likely in used bookstores):

 

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press. We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings, which will be available either online or in a course packet. I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above. I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses. I shall also select various supplementary readings as they become appropriate, and they will be available either via Blackboard or from a local copy shop.

 

I shall expect you to do each of the reading assignments carefully and thoughtfully before the class session in which we'll be discussing it, and to come to class ready to discuss it or at least to ask questions about anything in it you did not understand.

 

If you should have to miss a class session, it is vital that you use available electronic systems or personal contact immediately to find out what you missed and to get the assignment for the next session if you haven’t received it from me by email. You will be able to email me or fellow class members through the course website on Blackboard.

 

The Grading

 

I'll determine your course grade by assigning your first major paper 10 percent, your second and third 20 percent each, your fourth 30 percent, and your class participation 20 percent. By class participation I mean your participation in our system of “commencements” (described below) if we do them, your quiz grades (if we have them), your vocal participation in class discussion, whether by answering or asking questions, or commenting upon whatever is being discussed, in addition to attending class regularly. Missing class sessions more often than occasionally will lower your participation grade.

 

All grading will be on a scale of 100 to 0, and your final course grade will be an arithmetic average, weighted as indicated above, converted to a letter grade on a

10-points-per-letter scale, including pluses and minuses. Late paper grades will be

reduced by 10 points for each 24 hours or less that they are late, in the interests of both the class as a whole and your own progress. There will be no extra credit opportunitiesother than any in-class assignments I may decide to make from time to time.

 

Flag

 

Writing

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

37905 • Edwards, David
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.208
show description

 

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire. Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

The Readings

 

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Coop

(and likely in used bookstores):

 

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press. We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings, which will be available either online or in a course packet. I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above. I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses. I shall also select various supplementary readings as they become appropriate, and they will be available either via Blackboard or from a local copy shop.

 

I shall expect you to do each of the reading assignments carefully and thoughtfully before the class session in which we'll be discussing it, and to come to class ready to discuss it or at least to ask questions about anything in it you did not understand.

 

If you should have to miss a class session, it is vital that you use available electronic systems or personal contact immediately to find out what you missed and to get the assignment for the next session if you haven’t received it from me by email. You will be able to email me or fellow class members through the course website on Blackboard.

 

The Grading

 

I'll determine your course grade by assigning your first major paper 10 percent, your second and third 20 percent each, your fourth 30 percent, and your class participation 20 percent. By class participation I mean your participation in our system of “commencements” (described below) if we do them, your quiz grades (if we have them), your vocal participation in class discussion, whether by answering or asking questions, or commenting upon whatever is being discussed, in addition to attending class regularly. Missing class sessions more often than occasionally will lower your participation grade.

 

All grading will be on a scale of 100 to 0, and your final course grade will be an arithmetic average, weighted as indicated above, converted to a letter grade on a

10-points-per-letter scale, including pluses and minuses. Late paper grades will be

reduced by 10 points for each 24 hours or less that they are late, in the interests of both the class as a whole and your own progress. There will be no extra credit opportunitiesother than any in-class assignments I may decide to make from time to time.

 

Flag

 

Writing

GOV 335M • Religion In Amer Pol Thought

37910 • Budziszewski, J.
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as R S 346)
show description

GOV 335M / RS 346:

RELIGION AND POLITICS IN AMERICAN THOUGHT,

FROM THE COLONIES TO THE CULTURE WARS

 

Professor Budziszewski

 

Unique numbers:                Gov is 37910, RS is 43170.

Class meets:                         MW 5:00-6:30pm in MEZ 1.102

Prof's office hours:             M 12:00-3:00pm in MEZ 3.106

Prof’s email:                                    jbud@undergroundthomist.org

Prof’s office phone:                       512-232-7229 (phone does not record messages; email preferred)

Course website:                   Blackboard (subject to change)

Prof’s website:                         The Underground Thomist, http://www.undergroundthomist.org

 

PREREQUISITES, FLAGS, AND FIELD

 

If the course is taken as Gov 335M, enrollment requires six semester hours of lower-division government; it may also be taken as RS 346, but seats in that section are limited.  It carries a writing flag and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  Within the Government Department, its field is Political Theory.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

Religion in politics is an emotional issue for believers and nonbelievers alike, and there is a great temptation to simply clobber one's neighbor with a slogan like "Separation of church and state" or "In God we trust."  The purpose of this course is to help you get beyond the slogans.

 

We will be studying a large number of sources, mostly primary, mostly short, from the colonial period right up to the present.  Typically, we will read the religious arguments on each side of each of the issues we discuss.  Some sources discuss issues like whether faith should be enforced or whether revolution is consistent with the law of God.  Others discuss issues like the meaning of the Establishment and Free Exercise clauses in the Constitution.  Still others discuss particular historical controversies, such as whose side God was on in the Civil War, what God thinks of war in general, or what God requires by way of racial justice.  A final set of readings concerns the quarrel between secularism and its critics.

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

For Unit 1, the requirement is a set of analytical outlines (20%); for Units 2, 3, and 4, the requirement is a 4-page take-home essay (20% each).  Fourteen short-answer-format quizzes are administered on scheduled dates (20%).  There is no cumulative final examination.  Attendance and participation do affect grades.

 

Unit 1 analytical outlines (uncurved)                20%

Unit 2 essay plus extra credit (uncurved)          20%

Unit 3 essay plus extra credit (uncurved)          20%

Unit 4 essay plus extra credit (uncurved)          20%

Curved quiz average                                         20%

 

REQUIRED TEXTS

 

The required readings will be in a packet available for purchase at the UT Copy Center, McCombs 3.136, phone: 471-8281.  You must have a personal copy of the packet, not only for study but also for use in class.

 

An entirely optional reading, Evangelicals in the Public Square (Budziszewski), will be on reserve at the PCL.

GOV 335N • Southern Political History

37915 • Enelow, James
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 2.124
show description

Required Reading

 

Steve Bickerstaff, Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom DeLay, University of Texas, 2007.

Earl Black and Merle Black, The Rise of Southern Republicans, Harvard University

 Press, 2002.

William J. Cooper, Jr. and Thomas E. Terrill, The American South: A History,

         Volumes I and II, Fourth Edition, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2009

Michael Perman, Pursuit of Unity: A Political History of the American South,

         University of North Carolina Press, 2009

 

Description

 

The course will review Southern political history from the 1780s to the present. In the first part of the course, we review the events which transformed the South from a region of progressive nationalism from the 1780s to the 1810s to a region of defensive sectionalism from the 1820s to the 1860s. Touching briefly on the Civil War, we then take up Reconstruction and the agrarian movement of the late 19th century, followed by the period of the “Solid South” in the first half of the 20th century. Next we examine the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s, followed by the rise of southern Republicans in the late 20th century. Lastly, we examine Texas’s congressional redistricting in 2003.

 

Exams and Grades

 

There will be three in-class, multiple-choice exams on the dates noted below. The exams are not cumulative. There is no final exam. The first two exams have 35 questions and the last one has 30 questions for a total of 100 points on all three exams. The raw scores on the three exams are added and the total raw scores are then curved to determine your final grade, approximating the following distribution: 30% A’s, 35% B’s, 20% C’s, 10% D’s, and 5% F’s. Plus and minus grades will be given for total raw scores falling just above or below the boundary lines between grades. There is no extra credit. A make-up exam (not multiple-choice) will be given only if an exam is missed for a valid reason. 

GOV 337M • Law & Democracy Latin Amer

37920 • Brinks, Daniel M
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 308
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

 

Title: “Law and Democracy in Latin America”

 

Course description:

 

Subject matter of the course: This course explores many of the challenges and improvements to the rule of law across Latin America, and their connection to democracy. We will begin by examining the relationship between law and democracy, then look at a series of issues that illustrate the strength or weakness of the rule of law in the region. Rather than focusing on one country at a time or a few countries in depth, we will use events and systems in various countries as illustrations of important themes. We will also look at the possible consequences of these challenges for democracy in the region, and possible solutions.

The readings are a collection of recent research on these issues and require the students to engage critically with the readings. We will test authors’ claims against the evidence they present, challenge the logic of their arguments, and question their conclusions. To do this effectively, students must come to class prepared. We will use the quiz lotto (described below) to monitor and reward prepared class attendance.

By the end of the semester you will have acquired some basic information about Latin American legal systems, and some basic concepts about the different ways the law works in that part of the world. More importantly, however, you will have a greater understanding of what a robust democracy should look like, and where different countries fall short. You should be able to engage in a discussion about the role courts and laws do play, should play and can play in the (democratic) political systems of Latin America, and its potential for improvement. The various essays and the take home exam will help you to think about these issues and test how well you are acquiring the basic concepts and information needed.

 

Evaluation: Your grade in this course will be determined as follows:

15% each of the four essays due throughout the semester

15% your grade on the quiz lotteries

25% take home final

The quiz lottery: At the beginning of each class period, I will run the quiz lottery. The lottery has a 45% chance of generating a single question meant to determine whether you have done the reading for that day. The question should be fairly obvious if you have done the reading, but hard if you have not. If you are absent, you get a 0, if you are present but don’t know the answer, you earn a 1, if you answer accurately, you earn a 2. At the end of the semester I drop the lowest score and average the rest.

 

Required Books:

A Course Packet will be available from Jenn’s at 2200 Guadalupe. No books are required.

GOV 337M • Intnatl Politics Latin Amer

37925 • Weyland, Kurt
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M)
show description

Kurt Weyland

 

 

GOV 337M/LAS 337 – unique 37925/39665: International Politics of Latin America

 

Course description:

 

This course will analyze Latin America’s international relations in a wide-ranging, theoretically informed perspective. The first week will introduce a variety of theoretical approaches to this topic. For a few weeks thereafter, the course will examine U.S. policy toward Latin America, starting with the long list of U.S. interventions during the twentieth century (before and during the Cold War); we will focus on emblematic cases, such as Mexico (1910s), Guatemala (1954), Cuba (1959 ff), Chile (1970-73), Grenada (1983) & Panama (1989). We will then analyze how U.S. – Latin American relations have changed with the end of the Cold War. Thereafter, the course will investigate the impact of economic structures and forces on the region’s international position and influence; in particular, what have the repercussions of Latin America’s “economic dependency” been, and how has international economic integration (e.g., NAFTA) changed the region’s insertion into the international economic and political system? Finally, the last third of the course will discuss a variety of new issues that have arisen on Latin America’s international agenda, such as democracy and human rights; international migration; drugs and (other) international criminal activities; and the protection of the environment and of indigenous populations. How have the U.S. and Latin America dealt with all of these novel issues, and how do we need to adjust our theoretical frameworks to account for these new developments?

 

 

Grading:

 

1 six to seven page essay paper about questions distributed by the instructor; midterm and final examinations; 2 quizzes about the readings. Strict attendance rule & policy. Rigorous enforcement of scholastic honesty norms.

 

 

Texts:

 

Michael Grow, U.S. Presidents and Latin American Interventions. University Press of Kansas, paperback edition, 2012.

 

Robert Pastor, Exiting the Whirlpool. Westview Press, 2001.

 

Russell Crandall, The United States and Latin America after the Cold War. Cambridge University Press, 2008.

 

Coursepack with xeroxed journal articles and book chapters

 

Pls. note: The readings will amount to about 100 pp. of material per week.

GOV 341M • Decision Theory

37930 • Enelow, James
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WAG 214
show description

Required Reading

 

Joel Watson, Strategy: An Introduction to Game Theory. 2nd edition. W.W. Norton, 2008.

 

This is an applied math course and carries the Quantitative Reasoning flag. It is assumed that you are able to do simple calculations with fractions or decimals, solve linear equations with several variables, solve quadratic equations, and understand sets, functions, probability, and expected value. We will also use infinite series. If you are unfamiliar with any or all of these topics the course may be hard for you and you may need help outside of class.

 

In addition, this course is supported by Peer-Led Undergraduate Studying. PLUS study groups provide an opportunity to collaboratively practice skills and knowledge you need for success in this course.

 

Exams

 

There will be three in-class multiple-choice exams covering material from each of the three sections of the course. Each exam is of the problem-solving type, similar to the SAT math exam. There is no final exam. One or two unannounced quizzes may be given for extra credit. A make-up exam (not multiple-choice) will be given only if an exam is missed for a valid reason. Three of four announced quizzes will be given. There are no make-up quizzes.

 

Grades

 

The first exam will have approximately 20 questions, the second and third approximately 16 questions. Each question is worth one point. The points you receive on the three exams and the quizzes are added together to determine your total score. These scores will be curved to determine your final grade, approximating the following distribution: 30% A’s, 35% B’s, 20% C’s, 10% D’s and 5% F’s. Plus and minus grades will be given.

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

37950 • Lin, Tse-min
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 112
show description

Quantitative Reasoning Flag

 

Unique           Days   Time                                       Bldg/Room     Instructor

37950              TTH    11:00am-12:30pm                   BUR 112         LIN

 

Course Description

 

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Unlike the typical elementary statistical courses you may have taken, the emphasis here will be on applications in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding political science literatures based on the scientific approach, as well as to prepare interested students for more advanced methods courses.

 

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, contingency tables, and other statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use SPSS to analyze data from Gallup Survey, General Social Survey, and National Election Study in homework assignments. In particular, you will be asked to replicate results reported in journal articles and book chapters. You are also encouraged to develop and work out your own research problems.

 

Prerequisites

 

None

 

Grading Policy

 

Homework Assignments (6-7 sets): 30%

In-Class Midterm Exam: 30%

In-Class Final Exam: 30%

Instructor Discretion (Attendance, Participation, etc.): 10%

 

Required Texts

 

* T. H. Wonnacott and R. J. Wannacott. 1990. Introductory Statistics, 5th Ed. Wiley. (Or 4th Ed., Introductory Statistics for Buisness and Economics, 1990, which is the same as the 5th Ed.)

 

Optional Texts

 

* S. B. Green and N. J. Salkind, 2011. Using SPSS for Windows and Macintosh: Analyzing and Understanding Data, 6th  Ed. Prentice Hall.

 

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

37955 • McIver, John
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 3.116
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GOV 350K Course Description/McIver

 

Description

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Emphasis here will be on applications of statistic concepts and methods in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding more “technical” political science and public policy literature.

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables, and elementary multivariate statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use STATA to analyze data from Gallup Surveys, the General Social Survey, and the National Election Study in class and for homework assignments including a final paper.

 

Requirements

310L

 

Textbooks

Philip Pollack, Essentials of Political Analysis

Philip Pollock, A STATA Companion to Political Analysis

 

Grading

A midterm and final examination

Lab & home work

Term paper based on analysis of survey data

Attendance and Participation

GOV 351C • Classical Quest For Justice

37965 • Pangle, Lorraine
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 101
(also listed as CTI 320)
show description

In this course we will look at the problem of justice as it was explored in some of the greatest literary and philosophic works of ancient Greece. In the first part of the course, we will explore the challenges posed to political authority by three famous rebels: Achilles, a man of outstanding courage; Antigone, a woman who chose to obey the gods rather than a human king; and Socrates, a philosopher whose pursuit of the truth brought him to be condemned for impiety and corruption of the youth by the city of Athens. After reading their stories in Homer’s Iliad, Sophocles’ Antigone, Aristophanes’ comedy The Clouds, and Plato’s Apology, we will turn to Plato’s masterpiece on justice, The Republic. In this dialogue we will see how Socrates defends justice to the young, skeptical Glaucon by creating in speech a perfectly just city. This city, ruled by philosopher-kings, is an attempt to do justice to every claim to authority based on human excellence, inspiration, and wisdom, so as to win the loyalty of every reasonable person. In the course of creating the city in speech, Socrates explores the problem of justice from every angle and leads us to wonder whether a “perfect” political order may not even be desirable.

 

Prerequisites: thirty hours of coursework.

 

Required Texts:

Homer, Iliad

Sophocles, Antigone

Aristophanes, Clouds

Plato, Apology, Republic

 

Course Requirements:

Three short (3-5 pp.) papers, final exam.

GOV 351D • Theor Foundtns Modern Politics

37970 • Viroli, Maurizio
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 420
(also listed as CTI 321)
show description

 

 

Theoretical Foundations of Modern Politics

 

GOV 351D/CTI 321

 

Professor Maurizio Viroli

Class: Tuesday-Thursday 1100-12:30.

Email: Maurizio.viroli@gmail.com; Maurizio.viroli@austin.utexas.edu

 

 

The main goal of this course is to offer students a historical and philosophical

introduction to political philosophy. Unlike most introductory courses in political theory, GOV 351 does not attempt to cover the whole history of political philosophy from ancient Greece to our time, but focuses on a main theme, namely, the excellence of politics. It uses a few ancient and modern philosophers whose writings are particularly relevant for the topic of the course: Arendt, Aristotle, Beccaria, Cicero, Constant, Erasmus, Hobbes, Kant, Machiavelli, Marx, Rousseau, and Tocqueville and Hannah Arendt.

 

 

Reading List

 

Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism, Harcourt Brace

Aristotle, Politics, University of Chicago Press

Beccaria, Of Crimes and Punishments, Cambridge University Press

Cicero, On Duties, Cambridge University Press

Constant, “Of the Liberty of the Ancients” in Constant, Political Writings, Cambridge University Press

Erasmus, The Education of a Christian Prince, Cambridge University Press

Hobbes, Leviathan, Cambridge University Press

Locke, Second Treatise of Government, Cambridge University Press

Kant, “What is Enlightenment?,” “Perpetual Peace,” and “Idea for a Universal History,”in Kant, Political Writings, Cambridge University Press

Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Machiavelli, The Prince, Oxford University Press

__________, Discourses on Livy, University of Chicago Press

Marx, “The Communist Manifesto” in The Marx-Engels Reader, Tucker ed., Norton

Dostoevsky, The Legend of the Grand Inquisitor, Filiquarian Publishing

Rousseau, “Discourse on Inequality” and “Discourse on Political Economy,” in Rousseau, Basic Political Writings, Hackett

Skinner, Liberty Before Liberalism, Cambridge University Press

Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Mayer ed., Harper Collins

Skinner, Renaissance Virtues (selection), Cambridge University Press  

Walzer, Just and Unjust Wars

Walzer, Exodus and Revolution, Basic Books

 

 

 

 

Schedule of Lectures

 

Week I

Presentation of the course

Aristotle, Politics, Bk. I, chs. 1-2

 

Week 2

Aristotle, Politics, Bk. II, ch. 1 and Bk. III (all)

Cicero, On Duties, Bks. I and III

 

Week 3

Ambrogio Lorenzetti’ Buongoverno

Quentin Skinner, Renaissance Virtues  (selection)

 

Week 4

Erasmus, The Education of a Christian Prince (all)

Machiavelli, The Prince

 

Week 5

Machiavelli, The Discourses, Bk. I, chs. 1-13, 15-18, and 40-60

Machiavelli, The Discourses, Bk. II, chs. 1-3; Bk. III, Chs. 1, 3, 7, 8, and 41

 

Week 6  

Hobbes, Leviathan, Hobbes’ Introduction and chs. 13-22

Hobbes, Leviathan, chs. 26-31 and “A Review and Conclusion”

 

Week 7

Locke, Second treatise of Government  chs.I-IX

Locke, Second treatise of Government  chs.XI-XIX

 

Week 8

Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality

Rousseau, On Political Economy and Of the Social Contract

 

Week 9

Beccaria, Of Crimes and Punishments (all)

Kant, What is Enlightenment and Idea for a Universal History

 

Week 10

Kant, Perpetual Peace

Constant, The Liberty of the Ancients compared to the Liberty of the Moderns.; Skinner, Liberty before Liberalism (all)

 

Week 11

Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Vol. I: pp. 9-163 and 173-311

Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Vol. II: pp. 417-497

 

Week 12

Dostoevsky, The legend of The Grand Inquisitor

Marx, The Communist Manifesto

Week 13

M. Walzer, Exodus and Revolution

Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism, chs. 11 and 12.

 

Week 14

Primo Levi, Survival in Aushwitz

Michael Walzer, Just and Unjust Wars

 

Assignments and Grading

Midterm 40%

Final 60%

 

GOV 351G • Critics Of Modern Liberalism

37975 • Stauffer, Devin
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 420
(also listed as CTI 322)
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Spring 2015

 

Devin Stauffer

 

GOV 351G (cross-listed as CTI 322)

 

Critics of Modern Liberalism

 

Prerequisites

 

Sophomore standing

 

Course Description

 

This course examines the writings of a wide range of thinkers who have reflected deeply on the strengths and weaknesses of the most powerful political doctrine in the world today: liberal democracy.  We will begin by studying the original case for modern liberalism as it was presented by John Locke, the great architect of the modern liberal form of government and the modern liberal way of life.  After studying Locke, we will look at the Declaration of Independence and The Federalist Papers to consider the ways in which Lockean principles informed the American Founding.  After this introduction, we will look at a set of thinkers who range from friendly critics of liberal democracy who have concerns about its dangers to hostile critics of liberal democracy who argue for its destruction.  The “friendly critics” will include authors such as Mill and Tocqueville.  The “hostile critics” will span the political spectrum, from Marx on the Left to Nietzsche on the Right.  These authors raise far-reaching questions about liberalism: Do the principles of freedom and equality promote an isolating individualism that dissolves communal bonds?  Is liberalism tied to an oppressive capitalist economic system?  Has the rise of liberal democracy fostered mediocrity and complacency?  Finally, we will conclude by considering several different views of the theoretical and practical health of liberal democracy today.

 

Texts

 

Locke, Two Treatises of Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration (Yale)

Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, The Federalist Papers (Signet)

Mill, On Liberty (Penguin)

Tocqueville, Democracy in America (Chicago)

Marx and Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader (Norton)

Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil (Vintage)

Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Penguin) 

Course Supplement (available at Speedway Copying in the Dobie Mall)

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Paper: 20%

First exam: 25%

Second exam: 25%

Attendance: 10%

Participation: 10%

Quizzes: 10%

 

(Note: These percentages are approximate, and the paper may be made optional.)

GOV 351L • Morality And Politics

37980 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.102
(also listed as CTI 325)
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GOV 351L/CTI 325: Morality and Politics

 

The guiding question of this course concerns the relationship between morality and politics. What is the proper place of morality in political life? How much should moral and ethical considerations guide our political decision-making? Does the best political order aim at a morally decent life for individuals and communities? Or are moral aims misplaced in politics? We will examine the ways in which great thinkers both ancient and modern have grappled with these questions in political philosophy, history, and drama. The heart of the course consists of a contrast between the viewpoints of two giants of ancient and modern political philosophy respectively, Aristotle and Machiavelli. We will read selections from Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, and we will follow that with a close reading of Machiavelli’s Prince. We will also consider how the ethical questions considered in abstract terms in political philosophy play out in the stories of particular political actors in the plays by the likes of Euripides, Ibsen, and Shakespeare. Questions of friendship, revenge, necessity, fortune and chance, love, greed, religion, selflessness and self-concern, form the principle elements of our examination.

 

 

Required Texts:

 

1. Sophocles II: Four Tragedies. By Sophocles. Complete Greek Tragedies Series. University of Chicago Press.

 

2. Euripides II.  By Euripides. Complete Greek Tragedies Series. University of Chicago Press.

 

3. Politics. By Aristotle. Oxford University Press.

 

4. The Prince. By Niccolo Machiavelli. Translated by Harvey C. Mansfield. University of Chicago Press.

 

5. Julius Caesar. By William Shakespeare. Bantam Classics.

 

6. Darkness at Noon. By Arthur Koestler. Bantam Books.

 

7. Ibsen: Four Major Plays, Volume II. By Henrik Ibsen. Signet Classics.

 

Grading and Requirements:

 

First Exam: 30%

Second Exam:  30%

Paper: 30%

Class Participation, Including Pop Quizzes: 10%

GOV 353D • Darwin & Politics Of Evolution

37985 • Prindle, David
Meets MW 430pm-600pm CLA 0.102
(also listed as CTI 372)
show description

 

“Darwin and The Politics of Evolution”

Spring,  2015

Professor David Prindle

 

Purpose of the Course

 

            Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, generally shortened to The Origin of Species, is one of the two or three most influential science books ever published.  But unlike the case with other science books, The Origin, published in 1859, is also of profound political importance.  Part of this political importance—the implications of Darwin's theory for religious explanations of the diversity of life—is well understood by all socially-aware citizens.  But there is much less awareness of the political implications of controversies within the science of evolutionary biology founded by Darwin.

     In this class I will explicate and explore both the "outside" and "inside" political implications of the science launched by the Origin, and ask the students to evaluate them.

 

Assigned Reading

 

1)  Charles Darwin,  The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, first edition,

      (Barnes and Noble Classics, 2004) [first published 1859]

2)  Jerry Coyne, Why Evolution is True  (Viking, 2009)

3)  Phillip Johnson, Darwin on Trial, second edition, (InterVarsity Press, 1993)

4)  David Prindle, Stephen Jay Gould and the Politics of Evolution  (Prometheus Books,

      2009)

5)  A package of readings, available online.

 

Grading Criteria

 

        There are three assignments due in this class. I may make some minor adjustments in a few of the final grades to reflect excellent class participation, but in general, each of the three assignments counts one-third of the final grade.

        For your three assignments, you may choose to write two essays and take one test, or take two tests and write one essay.  It is up to you to decide how you mix the tests and essays, and in what order you choose to do them.  You may not, however, "load up" by turning in an essay at the same time that you take a test, thus getting two‑thirds of the assignments out of the way on the same day.

            At the end of the semester, an average of 92.3 or higher will earn an "A,", 90 to 92 will earn an “A-,” 88 to 89.7 will earn a “B+,” 82.3 to 87.7 will earn a "B," 80 to 82 will earn a "B-," 78 to 79.7 will earn a "C+," 62.3 to 77.7 will earn a "C," 60 to 62 will earn a "C-," and 50 to 59.7 will earn a "D."  People who have missed one or more of the three assignments, or who average below 50, will receive an “F.” 

           

 

 

Prerequisites

 

            Student are able to enroll in this class through two channels.  First, Government majors who are eligible for upper-division standing may enroll through the usual departmental processes.  Second, students who are participating in the Thomas Jefferson Center’s “great books” program (officially, CTI in the catalogue), may enroll in the class through that program.

GOV 355M • Human Behav As Rational Actn

37990 • Lin, Tse-min
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.216
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Writing Flag & Quantitative Reasoning Flag

 

Unique           Days   Time                                       Bldg/Room     Instructor

37990              TTH    3:30-5:00pm                           MEZ 1.216     LIN

 

Course Description

 

The term “rational action” as used in the economic approach is generally equated with maximizing behavior. Individual human agents are assumed to have consistent and stable preferences over alternatives each of which is assigned some “utility.” Maximization entails choosing the course of action that yields the highest expected utility. One is rational to the extent one uses the best means to achieve one’s goals.

 

In this course we will learn a variety of social and political models based on such a notion of individual rationality and to investigate the collective consequences that can be logically inferred from its assumptions. In particular, we will find through the “Prisoner’s Dilemma,” the “Tragedy of the Commons,” and the “Free-Rider Problem” a contrast between rational man and irrational society. Self-serving behavior of individuals does not usually lead to collectively satisfactory results.

 

So this course is about the stories of the Prisoners, the Herdsmen, and the Free-Riders. As a matter of fact, we will show that the Dilemma, the Tragedy, and the Problem share essentially the same mathematical structure, and hence they are essentially the same story - a story about human destiny. We will also introduce the various approaches that have been proposed for the escape from such a destiny.

 

Prerequisites

 

Upper-division standing required.

6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

 

Grading Policy

 

1. First Paper (6-8 pages): 25%                      2. Second Paper (7-9 pages): 25%

3. Third Paper (8-10 pages): 30%                  4. Presentation: 10%

5. Attendance: 10%

 

Texts

 

1. Thomas C. Schelling (1978), Micromotives and Macrobehavior (Norton).

2. Robert Axelrod (1984), The Evolution of Cooperation (Basic Books).

3. Dennis Chong (1991), Collective Action and the Civil Rights Movement (Chicago).

4. Elinor Ostrom (1990), Governing the Commons (Cambridge).

5. Howard Rheingold (2002), Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution (Basic Books).

6. Clay Shirky (2009), Here Comes Everybody (Penguin Books).

GOV 357M • Structure Of Indiv Liberties

38015 • Jacobsohn, Gary J.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ B0.306
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a) No Prerequisites  

b) The focus of this course is on the ways in which the Constitution protects individual rights as it accommodates the often competing claims of groups, communities, and the state. While the emphasis is on the United States Supreme Court, the class will also look at how other constitutional polities address similar issues.  We examine rights under the Constitution as they have evolved and been defined through judicial interpretation during periods of crisis and normalcy.  Some of the topics to be considered include: equal protection under law, substantive and procedural due process, freedoms of speech and religion, and privacy. Under these rubrics are to be found such issues as affirmative action, capital punishment, hate speech, property rights, abortion, and gender discrimination. Much of the reading is of Supreme Court opinions that highlight the politics of constitutional development.  

c) Two papers, each 30% of the final grade; a final exam worth 40% of the grade.  

d) Two texts, one a Con Law casebook, the second a collection of constitutional stories

GOV 357M • Asian American Jurisprudence

38020 • Ko, Ramey
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as AAS 325, AMS 321)
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Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S., Ethics and Leadership

Throughout the history of the United States, the law and the legal system have shaped nearly every facet of Asian American life.  The law can be used to exclude, to empower, and sometimes even to define the very meaning and definition of one’s community and identity.  Apart from the law itself, the court system, as the main forum for the discussion and resolution of legal disputes, has also had tremendous power to influence the lives and experiences of Asian Americans.  Whether it is immigration, national security, or the pursuit of happiness, the law has had and will continue to have a profound impact on the lives of Asian Americans everywhere.

This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the study of Asian Americans and the law.  Students will examine the historical development of US law and its relationship to Asian Americans, as well as the development of Asian American jurisprudence as an independent field of legal scholarship.  In addition, this course will provide students the tools to think critically about Asian Americans and the law by introducing students to principles of legal reasoning and analysis and the major schools of legal thought.  Topics will include immigration, civil rights, affirmative action, and access to justice.  Students will also learn about the common law system, legal positivism, legal realism, economic analysis of law, and critical race theory.

We will approach this course like a law school class.  The majority of the readings consist of primary source court opinions, and class time will focus on deepening student understanding of the course material through the Socratic method of question and answer.  Grading will be based on participation, five reading quizzes, a midterm, and a final.  Participation will be measured by quality, not quantity; what matters is not whether students can give a “right” or “wrong” answer, but whether student responses demonstrate a familiarity with the reading and a genuine effort to think critically about the subject matter.

GOV 358 • Introduction To Public Policy

38025 • Jones, Bryan
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ B0.306
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Texts

Carter A. Wilson, Public Policy: Continuity and Change, Second Edition

Timothy Conlan, Paul Posner, and David Beam.  Pathways of Power. 

Elaine C. Kamarck, How Change Happens—Or Doesn’t.

 

Course Overview

 

This course will examine the politics and history of public policymaking in America.  We will examine how policy is made, and whether LBJ’s dicta that “good policy is good politics” holds.  We will study contemporary policy challenges, the problems facing America, and the historical and contemporary development of polcies directed at those problems.  We will focus on such matters as financial and budgetary challenges, health care, income inequality,  education, environment, and justice. 

Since good policies can only come about with good information, properly interpreted, the course will emphasize the roles of ideas and information in the policy process: how elected and appointed political leaders use it to formulate and implement public policies.

 

This Year’s Theme:  Getting Policy Done in a time of Dysfunctional Politics.  Given the bad press the US political system receives these days, this course will explore how policy gets made—or does not get made—in our current political configuration.  Getting things done does NOT mean “productivity” measures like how many statutes are passed.  Good policies DOES mean BOTH addressing important collective problems AND avoiding action when it is neither needed nor desirable. 

 

Since good policies can only come about with good information, properly interpreted, the course will emphasize the roles of ideas and information in the policy process: how elected and appointed political leaders use it to formulate and implement public policies.

Course Objectives

* Survey the approaches used by political scientists to understand the public policymaking process.

    * Integrate current public affairs into our understanding of public policy.

    * Survey the use, history, and success of the major tools used by governments in the US to address policy problems in several major issue areas.

    * Further the development of analytical skills in policy analysis through brief exercises and a major paper employing library and web-based sources. Students will use the Policy Agendas Project's datasets located at the University of Texas to trace public policy activity across time.

 

Grading Policies

 

Course grades will be based on a major exam, a paper in which students study a specific public policy and analyze its historical development, current status, and offer potential recommendations that incorporate both the desirable and the practical; and regular weekly quizzes and exercises.

GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

38030 • Edwards, David
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ B0.306
show description

 

 

Prerequisites

None

 

Course description

International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, even in the absence of events such as terrorist attacks on the homeland, whether we realize this or not, and whether we play any conscious roles in international relations or not.  In fact, as we’ll see this semester, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and things we do in our own lives in turn can have impacts on aspects of international relations.

In this course we’ll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today—among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and spiritual movements.  Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happen as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.

 

Grading Policy

Two in class exams and a final exam, each of which will be part multiple choice and part essay.

 

Texts

 TBD

GOV 662L • Government Rsch Internship-Dc

38040 • Swerdlow, Joel L
Meets
show description

Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites and/or other Restrictions:

Acceptance into the University of Texas, Archer Fellowship Program

Course Description: This course will focus on the role of media, the Congress, the

President and other governmental and non-governmental actors in the policy-making

process. Through a variety of sources (academic texts, newspaper and journal articles,

websites, blogs, advocacy papers) we will look at (and hopefully reconcile) the textbook

and “real world” versions of how policy is made in Washington, D.C.

This course is divided into four phases where we will use a variety of techniques

(lectures/discussion, in-class presentations and guest speakers) to gain a better

understanding of the policy-making process. In Phase I, we will discuss how policy is

defined: where ideas come from and who plays a role in defining what we consider to be

important policy problems. In Phase II, we will look at how policy is made and how the

structures of our unique form of government affect the policy-making process. In Phase

III we will meet with policy-makers to hear their first hand accounts of the policy-making

process and finally, in Phase IV we will try to understand the policy-making process

through a legislative simulation and class discussions/debates of some of the important

issues of the day.

GOV 365N • European Environmntl Politics

38050 • Mosser, Michael W
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JES A209A
(also listed as EUS 348)
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EUS 348/GOV 365N: European Environmental Politics

Spring 2015

Unique: 38050

 

Dr. Michael W. Mosser

Course location: JES A209A

Office:  Mezes 3.222

Course time: TTh 930 am-11:00 am

Phone: 512.232.7280

Office hours: W 1000 – 1100

Email: mosserm@austin.utexas.edu

(and by appointment)

Course concept

Environmental politics is one area where Europe arguably leads the world. Europe has, at both the national and European-Union level, committed itself to achieving reductions in carbon emissions far greater than anywhere else in the world.

This course will examine the history of environmental politics in both the member states of the European Union and the EU itself. Beginning with a conceptual treatment of general environmental politics and policies, the course moves to a history of European environmentalism, before shifting to a discussion on the institutional responses at important ‘traditional’ Member States (Germany, France, Italy and the UK) as well as ‘new‘ Member States (Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary). The final section of the course examines EU environmental policies themselves, such as the EU Emissions Trading System and its institutional commitment to meeting Kyoto Protocol goals.

Assignments and grading

Your course grade will consist of a midterm exam grade, a take-home final exam grade, a short paper grade and a discussion/participation grade. All assignments will be converted to a 100-point scale with no curve. All grades, including final grades, will use the plus (+) and minus (-) system. Grade standards for all assignments are as follows:

 

93 >     A  

90-92   A-

87-89   B+  

80-86   B   

77-79   B-   

75-76   C+   

70-74   C

67-69   C-

60-66   D

< 60  F

 

 

 

Exams: 50%

As this class is an upper-division course, a major portion of the grade for the course will consist of exams, consisting of a midterm exam and a take-home final exam. Both the midterm and the take-home final exam will be worth 25% of your course grade.

Paper: 30%

The paper for this class will be a short (2000 word) exploratory paper on one of the five topics chosen by the instructor. Such a paper should be a reasonably thorough treatment of the topic chosen, including a clear thesis statement, logical consistency in the arguments used to show the validity of the thesis, and a clear and concise conclusion that effectively summarizes your argument. The paper should be no more than 2000 words in length. Soon after the beginning of the semester, I will meet with each of you individually to discuss your choice of paper topic and your approach chosen to address it. The paper will comprise 30% of your total grade for the course. The paper grade itself will be divided into four sections:

 

     Topic choice: due 29 January . Worth 10% of paper grade (3% of course grade).

     Topic outline and list of references: due 12 February. Worth 20% of paper grade (6% of course grade).

     First draft of paper:  due 2 April.  Worth 20% of paper grade (6% of course grade).

     Final draft of paper: due 30 April.  Worth 50% of paper grade (15% of course grade).

Discussion Questions / Participation: 20%

Class discussion in a an upper-level seminar is more than expected; it is a given. Everyone has his or her own style of discussion, and I do not expect to turn those who prefer not to speak often in class into debate champions. Nevertheless, I do expect that each of you to post one discussion question per week in the online discussion forum. The discussion posting will count for 15% of your grade and in-class participation will comprise 5% of your course grade.

 

So that we can discuss points raised in the online postings in Thursday’s class, discussion questions for the week on which I am lecturing will be due by 5:00 pm every Wednesday (unless directed otherwise). They should be drawn from the readings or current news events and should reflect any questions, comments, or cries of outrage you may have regarding the arguments set forth by the authors. They most definitely will help you get the most from the class. I will prepare the first set of discussion questions as a template for future assignments.

The total number of discussion postings will be counted at the end of the semester, and also will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

 

  • 12-15 postings: Full credit
  • 8-11 postings: 70% credit
  • 5-7 postings: 50% credit
  • Less than 5 postings: No credit

 

A word on late or missed assignments. Over the course of the semester, it is inevitable that some event will cause a time management issue, which might lead to a missed assignment deadline. Though normally handled on a case-by-case basis, there are some baseline penalties for missed or delayed assignments, detailed here:

  • Late topic choices will receive a 1% deduction per day before grading.
  • Late topic outline and list of references will receive a 2% deduction per day before grading.
  • Late paper drafts will receive a 5% deduction per day before grading.
  • Missed exams will receive a 5% deduction per day until made up.
  • Discussion postings will not be counted on an individual-post basis, but will be examined throughout the semester for evidence of consistent posting. Do not expect to “catch-up” post only at the end of the semester and receive full participation credit.

GOV 365N • Human Rights & World Politics

38055 • Evans, Rhonda L.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as WGS 340)
show description

GOV 365N Human Rights and World Politics

Rhonda Evans

 

Human rights as codified in various international instruments form a central part of contemporary politics. International human rights provide activists with a powerful discourse that can be used to frame and legitimate contested claims.  Moreover, its legal and institutional manifestations offer activists new political opportunities for pressuring human rights violators to change their behavior.  This course takes human rights activists as its focus, examining them from a distinctly political perspective.  It traverses the ways in which advocates and their organizations give meaning to human rights and mobilize these meanings in pursuit of political and policy objectives.  In so doing, the course engages three key questions:  (1) What are the mechanics of international human rights advocacy?  (2) Does international human rights advocacy work?  (3) And, does it ultimately promote democratic practices and values? 

 

This course introduces you to the legal, political, and policy dimensions of human rights. It explores the philosophical, legal, and moral foundations of human rights and surveys the legal and institutional infrastructure and processes that exist at domestic and international levels for promotion of human rights. In so doing, it examines various actors involved in human rights advocacy, including states, international organizations, international tribunals, nongovernmental organizations, and the media. The course also engages critical social science questions about the study of human rights, including: How do we operationalize and measure human rights abuses and advances over time and geopolitical space? And, on what basis can we assess the effectiveness of international human rights advocacy?

 

Answers to the all of the questions that animate this course will be pursued through critical engagement with important contemporary issues in human rights policy.  By the semester’s end, you should understand basic laws, policies, institutions, processes, and debates in the evolving international human rights regime and appreciate the role of human rights advocacy in international and domestic politics.

 

Course Requirements:  Final course grades will be based upon the following:  participation in a simulation exercise (15%); a midterm exam (30%); a final exam (30%); and, a group research project (25%).  Note that all electronic devices, including laptop computers, will be strictly forbidden absent documentation of need by an appropriate university official.

 

Books: Beth A. Simmons, Mobilizing for Human Rights:  International Law in Domestic Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2009); Ann Marie Clark, Diplomacy of Conscience (Princeton University Press, 2001).

GOV 365N • Immigration And Compar Polit

38058 • Freeman, Gary
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CBA 4.338
show description

Immigration and Comparative Politics Gov 365N, 38058

 

This course explores some of the profound global developments that threaten the future of liberal democratic societies. Among these are unprecedented mass population movements, alarming demographic trends, growing awareness of environmental pressures, simmering religious/cultural conflicts, and the scientific earthquake taking place in biology and related scientific fields that challenge long-held beliefs about human nature and undermine cherished assumptions about the possibility of democracy, social peace, and the idea of progress itself.

 

Public debate on immigration policy in the USA and elsewhere tends to be narrowly constrained in both available policy options and the language in which the issue is discussed. Should immigration be freer or more tightly controlled, should immigration policy select for skill, or give preference to the kin of immigrants already in Europe? Policy makers and elites have tended to assume (or simply hope) that the new residents of their countries can be integrated in such a way as to preserve major elements of their cultures while at the same time inculcating respect for democratic values: this, despite the fact that the vast majority of migrants have scant acquaintance with the norms of liberal democracy.

The migration of populations from the third world into the rich democracies of Europe, North America, and Australasia is bringing about enormous changes that are rarely appreciated or even noted in public discussions of the rights and wrongs of immigration.  When today’s migration is conjoined with declining birth rates in the West and exploding fertility in the Non-Western immigrant source countries, it is fundamentally altering the ethnic, religious, cultural, and political composition of the populations of Western democracies.

 

Requirements:

 

Attendance: Students are required to attend class and class attendance and participation will account for 20 percent of your grade.

 

Exams: There will be NO exams.

 

Writing Assignments: Students are asked to write four papers. Each will deal with the subjects of the readings required and suggested for the last four of the five sections of the course. The specific topics from which you will select just one for your essays are included in the syllabus just after the required and suggested readings. This is meant to help you select which, if any, of the suggested readings you wish to explore. Papers will be no more than 3 pages long and will be graded according to how seriously you dig into the questions the topic poses. Excellent papers will deal with the required readings but use of the suggested readings is purely optional.

Extra Credit: Students may earn extra credit on their final course average by submitting a one page report on a public lecture you attend whose topic is salient to the course material and has been either designated by the instructor as eligible for extra credit or approved by the instructor upon your request. One point will be rewarded for each report up to a total of just three points.

 

Grades will be computed in the following manner:

 

Paper 1                       20

Paper 2                       20

Paper 3                       20

Paper 4                       20

Class participation        20

Total                           100

 

Total possible with 3 extra credit points:  103

 

 

TEXTS:

 

There are no texts to be purchased. All required and suggested readings will be posted on Canvas and can be read there or downloaded and printed. 

GOV 365N • Military In Politics

38059 • Barany, Zoltan
Meets MW 500pm-630pm PAR 1
show description
The Military in Politics

 

GOV 365N, 38059

Spring 2015/PAR 1/M/W 5-6:30

Department of Government

Instructor: Prof. Zoltan Barany (barany@austin.utexas.edu)

Office: BAT 3.156/Office hours: M/W 1:30-3

 

What social and political role do the armed forces play in the modern state and society?  What are the hallmarks of democratic civil-military relations?  Can the armed forces play a progressive social role?  Do generals in power ever promote economic development or should they be expected to loot the country they rule?  And, ultimately, why do people with guns obey those without?  The purpose of this course is to seek answers to these and other age-old questions and to acquaint the advanced undergraduate student with the military's role in the modern state and society.  To prevent misunderstandings: the class does not deal with weapon systems, nuclear proliferation, strategy, or tactics.  Rather, we focus on the sociopolitical character of the armed forces in a variety of political settings: advanced democracies, authoritarian states, post-communist systems, etc.

 

In the first half of the class we are going to be learning about the armed forces of the United States, then, in the second half, we will broaden our horizons and look at armies and politics in the rest of the world.  My goal is to have you leave this class in May as someone who can intelligently discuss the political and societal role of the armed forces in a number of different contexts.  I respect you enough to have high expectations because I assume that as students at the University of Texas at Austin you want to satisfy high standards.  We will also have fun, viewing a couple of documentaries with military politics themes and reading books that you will not just learn from but, I hope, enjoy.

 

There will be a one-hour examination on April 1 that will test your knowledge of the materials. This test will be a combination of multiple-choice and one essay question (you will pick one out of three).  Other than this, the most important assignment is the 10-12-page analytical research paper that should be informed by at least 10 different sources (books, articles, etc.).  It should answer a clear research question, should be structurally sound and the argument(s) should be built to follow logical reasoning.  It should be analytical and feature relatively little descriptive material (i.e., ask not “how?” ask instead “why?”).  We will, of course, discuss the best way to approach your paper in class and in office hours.

 

Prerequisite: For Juniors and Seniors

      Grading

 

1. first midterm examination                                             25%                           

2. second midterm examination                          25%

3. pop quizzes                                                          10%

4. class participation                                                          15%

5. research paper and its in-class presentation           25%

 

 

Required Readings

 

Bacevich, Andrew. Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country (Picador, 2014). ISBN: 1250055385

 

Barany, Zoltan. The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton University Press, 2012). ISBN: 0691137692

 

Owens, Mackubin Thomas. US Civil-Military Relations After 9/11: Renegotiating the Civil-Military Bargain (Bloomsbury Academic, 2011). ISBN: 1441160836

 

… and selected articles for the classes on the armed forces of the Muslim world

GOV 365N • Suicide Terrorism

38060 • Pedahzur, Ami
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 100
show description

Prerequisites:

None.

 

Course Description:

Suicide terrorism in its modern form appeared in the early 1980s. The first organization to use it was the Shiite Hezbollah in Lebanon. Later, it was adopted by many groups in the Middle East, Asia and Europe. The fact that the majority of these groups were either Arab or Muslim led scholars to emphasize the role of Islam in the emergence and proliferation of the phenomenon. The general purpose of the class is to reassess the root causes of suicide terrorism at elite, community and rank-and-file levels. It will juxtapose the role of religion, and specifically Islam, in generating suicide terrorism, which is represented by the primordial cultural approach, with coercion theories, power struggle explanations and social networks approach. It will also address the perplexing question of whether suicide terrorism is an unbeatable weapon.

 

Grading Policy:

 

This course combines Quizzes, Exams, Participation, and Reading questions. The breakdown for the course is as follows:

I. Class attendance and active participation: 20% Class attendance is mandatory and will be recorded, your attendance at, and participation in, lectures are crucial to the success of this course.

II. Weekly Reading and Questions: 20% Course readings are a vital part of this class and should be completed prior to the class meeting listed on the syllabus. Each week you will be responsible for formulating an answer to a question based on that week’s readings. Your answer should be one to two double spaced pages and are due at the end of class every Thursday. I will grade your answers on a scale of 0 to 2, with 2 being excellent work and 0 being unacceptable.  These are designed as engaging and thought provoking questions to help you navigate the course and the exams. Please note: We do not accept late work.

III. Quizzes: (10% each for 20% total): There will be two quizzes given during the semester. These will cover some of the basic backgrounds and key foundational concepts that will be needed in order to proceed in the course. The format will be a combination of fill in the blank and multiple choice.

IV. Exams (20% each for 40% total): There will be two exams given during the semester. These will cover the larger conceptual and topical aspects of the course. They will incorporate the ideas we have learned through the lectures and readings and ask you to comment on the contemporary debates and issues in the study of suicide terrorism. The format will be a combination of multiple choice and essay questions.

 

Texts All the texts will be posted on Canvas.

 

Topic 1 – CONCEPTS AND CONTEXT

Assaf Moghadam.  “Defining Suicide Terrorism” in Ami Pedahzur (ed.). Root Causes of Suicide Terrorism: The Globalization of Martyrdom. London: Routledge, 2006: 1-19.

Topic 2 - Culture

Raphael Israeli.  “Islamikaze  and  their  Significance”. Terrorism  and  Political Violence, Vol. 9 No. 3 (1997): pp. 96-121.

Mohammed Hafez. 2006.  “Dying To Be Martyrs: The Symbolic Dimension  of Suicide Terrorism”. In  Pedahzur  (ed.). Root Causes of Suicide Terrorism: The Globalization of Martyrdom. London: Routledge. 54-80.

Topic 3 - Psychological/Individual Approach

Lankford, Adam, and Nayab Hakim. "From Columbine to Palestine: A Comparative Analysis of Rampage Shooters in the United States and Volunteer Suicide Bombers in the Middle East." Aggression and Violent Behavior 16, no. 2 (2011): 98-107.

Topic 4 - The Strategic Approach

Robert A. Pape. “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism”. American Political Science Review, Vol. 97 No. 3 (2003): pp. 343-361

Assaf Moghadam.  “Suicide Terrorism, Occupation, and the Globalization of Martyrdom: A Critique of Dying to Win”. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Vol. 29 No. 8 (2006): pp. 707-729.

Horowitz, Michael. "Nonstate Actors and the Diffusion of Innovations: The Case of Suicide Terrorism." [In English]. International Organization 64, no. 1 (Win 2010): 33-64.

Topic 5 - The Outbidding Thesis

Mia M. Bloom. “Palestinian Suicide Bombing: Public Support, Market Share, and Outbidding”. Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 119 No. 1  (2004): pp. 61-88

Robert  J. Brym and Bader Araj. “Palestinian Suicide Bombing Revisited: A Critique of the Outbidding Thesis”. Political Science Quarterly Vol. 123 No. 3 (Fall 2008): pp. 485-500.

Topic 6 - Communities

Ami Pedahzur, Arie Perliger and Leonard Weinberg. “Altruism and fatalism: The characteristics of Palestinian suicide terrorists”. Deviant Behavior, Vol. 24 No. 4 (2003): pp. 405-423.

Ami Pedahzur and Arie Perliger. “The Changing Nature of Suicide Attacks.” Social Forces, Vol. 84 No. 4 (2006): pp. 1983-2000.

Topic 7 - The road to 9/11

Assaf Moghadam.  “Motives for Martyrdom; Al-Qaida, Salafi Jihad, and the Spread of Suicide Attacks.” International Security (Winter 2008/2009).

Marc Sageman. 2006. In Pedahzur (ed.). “Islam and al-Qaeda” Root Causes of Suicide Terrorism: The Globalization of Martyrdom. London: Routledge. 122-131.

Topic 8 - The War on Terrorism and its Outcomes

Bruce Hoffman. 2008. “The Myth of Grass-Roots Terrorism: Why Osama bin Laden Still Matters” Foreign Affairs (87)3: 133-138.

Marc Sageman. “Does Osama Still Call the Shots? Debating al Qaeda’s Containment and Grass-roots Jihad” Foreign Affairs Vol. 87 No. 4 (2008): pp. 1-3.

Yoram Schweitzer. 2006. “Al Qaeda and the Global Epidemic of Suicide Attacks” in Ami Pedahzur, Root Causes of Suicide Terrorism. 132-151.

Topic 9 – The Consequences of Suicide Terrorism

Canetti-Nisim, Daphna. Mesch, Gustavo. Pedahzur, Ami. 2006. “Victimization from Terrorist Attacks: Randomness or Routine Activities?”. Terrorism and Political Violence. Vol. 18. No. 4. Pp. 485-501

Feniger, Yariv, and Ephraim Yuchtman-Yaar. "Risk Groups in Exposure to Terror: The Case of Israel's

Citizens." Social forces 88, no. 3 (Mar 2010): 1451-62.

Berrebi, Claude, and Esteban F. Klor. "Are Voters Sensitive to Terrorism? Direct Evidence from the Israeli Electorate." American Political Science Review 102, no. 03 (2008): 279-301.

Topic 10 - Counter-terrorism and Anti Terrorism

Perliger, Arie. Pedahzur, Ami. 2006. “Coping with Suicide Attacks: Lessons from Israel”. Public Money and Management. Vol. 26 No. 5. Pp. 281-286.   

Max Abrahms. “What Terrorists Really Want; Terrorist Motives and Counterterrorism Strategy.” International Security (Spring 2008).

Chenoweth, E., N. Miller, E. McClellan, H. Frisch, P. Staniland, and M. Abrahms. "What Makes Terrorists Tick." [In English]. International Security 33, no. 4 (Spr 2009): 180-86.

Topic 10 - The Future of Suicide Terrorism

Martha Crenshaw. “Explaining Suicide Terrorism: A review essay” Security Studies, Vol. 16 No. 1 (2007): pp. 133-162.

Audrey Kurth Cronin. “How al-Qaida Ends: The Decline and Demise of Terrorist Groups” International Security Vol. 31 No. 1 (Summer 2006): pp. 7-48.

GOV 370L • Policy-Making Process-Dc

38065
Meets
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • American Political Development

38066 • Sparrow, Bartholomew
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GDC 2.402
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • The United States Congress

38075 • Leal, David L.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 0.102
show description

Course Description

 

This course will examine what one scholar called the “keystone” of the Washington establishment – the U.S. Congress.  It is the first branch of government established by the Constitution (in Article I), and little in the world of national policymaking can be accomplished without it.  While public opinion of Congress is often low, this institution is the oldest popularly-elected legislative body in the world.  The course begins with a study of the political history of Congress – its creation, how it evolved over time, and how it reached its current configuration.  Because procedures matter, the formal and informal rules of Congress and the committee system will be discussed.  The course will also explore congressional elections, the motivations and behaviors of members of Congress, lobbying, congressional leadership, reapportionment and gerrymandering, and the role of political parties.  Congressional interactions with other branches of government, especially the presidency, will be covered.  In addition, the many differences between the House and Senate will be explored.

 

Grading Policy

 

Exam #1 (20% of course grade)

 

Exam #2 (30% of course grade)

 

Exam #3 (30% of course grade)

 

Book review (20% of course grade)

 

Texts

 

Roger H. Davidson, Walter J. Oleszek, and Frances E. Lee. Congress and Its Members, 14th edition. Congressional Quarterly Press.

 

Walter J. Oleszek. Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process, 9th edition. Congressional Quarterly Press.

 

Ross Baker. House and Senate. Norton, 4th edition.

 

Course pack

GOV 370L • The United States Congress

38080 • Theriault, Sean
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 101
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Social Movements: Thry/Prac

38084 • O'Brien, Shannon Bow
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description:

This course is about social movements.  Social movements involve groups of people organizing or coalescing around issues.  This course is designed to be an introduction to the topic.  Groups of people have been organizing together towards joint goals for centuries.  People with differing opinions about actions, policies, and behaviors want to have their voice heard about their concerns.  Social movements often develop when a large enough number of people with similar problems come together.  Some movements are total failures.  Some succeed and thrive and others succeed and subside.  Still, many others fall somewhere between success and failure.

This course plans to introduce broad ideas about social movements, raise important questions, and help students develop a better understanding about them.  Every movement is different, but elements within them can be categorized and understood.  The analysis of these elements can give you the tools to look at movements or groups within society and make educated guesses about their long term viability. 

The literature of social movements can be very theoretical and difficult to decipher.  The class will only have 1 assigned book for the semester.  This book is a compilation of many important articles, papers, and readings regarding social movements.

 

Required Readings:

 

There is ONE (1) book required for this course. 

The Social Movements Reader: Cases and Concepts, 2nd edition. Edited by Jeff Goodwin and James M. Jasper, Publisher: Wiley Blackwell, 2009 ISBN: 978-1-4051-8764

I also reserve the right to assign additional readings from time to time if I feel they are needed. Any additional readings will be added Blackboard and also announced in class.

This course may require additional readings from JSTOR or other online sources.

 

Grades:  2 tests, three written assignments

Grades will based on the following:  

Midterm                                       30% 
Final                                            40%


Paper Assignments:

Paper Assignment 1   worth 5%
Paper Assignment 2     worth 5%
Executive Summary of a Social Movement    worth 20%

GOV 370L • Political Psychology

38087 • Albertson, Bethany L
Meets MW 400pm-530pm MEZ 1.120
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • The Politics Of Health Care

38088 • McDaniel, Eric
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 1.106
show description

Course Description

Health care is currently one of the most hotly debated topics in American politics. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the issues and controversies that surround healthcare policy and the American healthcare system. The course will facilitate this by first establishing a theoretical and substantive framework regarding various aspects of policymaking and the American healthcare system. Upon the establishment of this framework, the course will then delve into the examination of a number of specific health problems and the controversies surrounding them. Students should leave this class with a working knowledge of the American policy making process, substantial knowledge of the American healthcare system and an understanding of the roots of current debates in American healthcare policy. 

 

Required Texts and Items

1.            Teitelbaum, Joel Bern, and Sara E. Wilensky. 2013. Essentials of health policy and law. Sudbury, Mass.: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

2.            Additional readings and videos will be made available through links on the syllabus or will be posted on Canvas.

a.            The symbol {C} denotes that the material is on Canvas

3.            Students are expected to be aware of current events and regularly read either the New York Times or Washington Post. Further, students should make themselves familiar with the following organizations: Kaiser Family Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Commonwealth Fund.

 

Coursework

Assessments in this class will be performed through quizzes and exams. Both the quizzes and exams are cumulative. Knowledge developed in the beginning of the class will be very pertinent to subsequent sections of the class. If you fall behind at the beginning of the class, you will not be able to catch up.

 

Quizzes: worth 150 points

Exams: worth 400 points

The 2-Part Policy Memo: worth 50 points

 

Quizzes                                           150 points

Exam One                                        200 points

Exam Two                                        200 points

Policy Memo Part I                            25 points

Policy Memo Part II                           25 points             

Total                                                600 points

GOV 370L • Politics And The Economy

38089 • Svensen, Eric
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 303
show description

Svensen Course Description: Politics and Economics

Unique: 38089

GOV 370L

TTH 3:30 – 4:45PM

PAR 303

 

Course Overview:

This course has two basic objectives: (1) to give the student an overview of how politics and economics interact, and (2) to introduce the student to key theories and analytical tools to study this interaction. In this course, we will identify and analyze basic institutions and processes of the American political economy, showing how the more important economic and political institutions work and how they influence each other. Specifically, this course is designed to analyze different theories that argue for or against government intervention in the economy and to judge how the consequences of these theories and the policies that adopt them affect economic outcomes and the American political system. Because economic resources can be used to seek political power and influence, and because political influence is often used to acquire or protect economic advantages, we will investigate whether capitalist and democratic political institutions are naturally compatible or fundamentally antagonistic to each other. Previous coursework in macro or microeconomics is not required. 

Prerequisites:

Students must have completed twelve semester hours of college credit and received a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) or another appropriate test before enrolling in this course.

Grading Policy:

Each student is required to complete a research paper. The length of the paper will be 12+ pages, excluding references. Students will develop their own research question, pending my approval and assistance, on a topic that intersects politics and economics. Students will be required to meet regular and scheduled completion dates at various stages in their project. Besides the research project, different students will be assigned as discussion leaders for that week’s readings. All students are required to complete course readings. Finally, all students are required to write an annotated bibliography on works related to their research question that they will share with the class. The bibliography serves two purposes. First, this is a good technique for getting familiar with the readings associated with your research project. Second, this is an excellent method to gain additional insight into readings that may be tangential to your own research, yet you simply did not have the time to read yourself. 

Participation: 20%

Research Paper First Draft: 5%

Research Paper Second Draft: 5%

Annotated Bibliography: 10%

Research Paper (Due Finals Week): 60%

 

Readings:

TBA.

GOV 374N • Political Internship

38090 • Henson, James
Meets TH 600pm-700pm BAT 5.108
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION – Spring 2015

The Government Department internship program provides students an opportunity to combine work experience in government and politics with academic coursework. This course emphasizes guiding students through the design and execution of a carefully defined small-scale research project, and an analysis of their research that can be communicated intelligibly to a public audience. The coursework is designed to sharpen students’ ability to use basic academic research skills as tools in a professional environment, and to convey the results of their research in ways that contribute to public discourse about politics, policy, and government.

Most of students’ time and energy will be directed toward performing the duties of their internships in a manner that reflects positively on them and on The University of Texas at Austin. A solid performance as an intern provides a rich learning experience, the possibility of future intellectual and professional opportunities, and also reflects well on the program, paving the way for future students to have the same opportunities current interns enjoy.

However, interns should be clear about the nature of this course. Students are not receiving credit from the Government Department primarily for fulfilling their internships. Students receive grades and credit for completing the internships in conjunction with guided course work. Supervisor evaluations are taken into account in assigning grades per the grading criteria below, but 75% of your course grade is based on assessment of academic work completed for the course.

GOV 379S • Regime Persp On Amer Politics

38100 • Tulis, Jeffrey
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as CTI 335, LAH 350)
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This is a seminar on American politics and culture.   Two purposes govern the selection of texts for the course and guide our discussion of them.  All of our texts attempt to look at American politics as a whole.  Most books and courses on America look at only a part, such as the Presidency, or elections, or popular culture.  Here we attempt to think about how the parts of America fit together.  Even when these texts speak about a part, for example an institution such as the presidency or the Congress, they present the topic from a vantage point on the whole polity.   To see the polity as a whole also means that we will have to revisit and rethink aspects of our political life that we take for granted – that we don’t examine because those parts have become so natural or familiar to us.  Seeing the polity whole enables us to render the familiar unfamiliar, to make what we take for granted strange and new.

 

To see the polity as a whole requires that we get some distance from our subject, much as to see the planet earth as a whole requires one to look at it from outer space.  Just as it is difficult to get visual perspective on a place living within it, it is difficult to understand the promise or pathologies of a regime from within.  To get critical distance from our politics, we will closely study three sets of texts that look at American politics from a distance.   The first part of the course will recover the perspective of the founding debate between Federalists and Anti-federalists.   This fundamental debate reveals what is a stake in the basic architecture of the American regime.  The second part of the course is a close study of Tocqueville’s Democracy in America.  Regarded by many as the best book ever written on democracy and the best book written on America, Tocqueville sees our polity whole because he looks at it from the vantage point of Europe, in general, and France, in particular.  In the third part of the seminar we think about American politics from the perspective of thoughtful commentators who feel only nominally included in the polity.   Half in and half out, these extraordinary black American writers reveal fissures and fault lines in the American regime.  We end the class with a discussion of America’s place in the world today – examining a speech by a writer who articulately raises challenges to our self-understanding that are inarticulately expressed today in rage and ranting from enemies of the United States.

 

Requirements:

 

Three take home analytic essays, chosen from a list of topics I provide, each weighted 25% of the course grade.  Late essays will not be accepted, except with a doctor’s excuse or a Dean’s excuse for family emergency.

 

OR as an option: you may write the two short essays (both together weighted 25%) and do a longer 15 page paper on a topic of your choice in consultation with me (weighted 50% of your course grade).   Government honors students who are thinking of doing an honors thesis next year may prefer this option to begin to develop research and writing skills for longer work.  Students who prefer this option will need to designate their preferred third short essay and have discussed with me a topic for their long paper by March 30. 

 

Texts:

The Federalist

Selected Anti-Federalist writings

Tocqueville, Democracy in America

Essays, speeches and articles by Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Dubois, Booker T. Washington, James Baldwin and Ralph Ellison

GOV 379S • Jerusalem And Athens

38105 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 206
(also listed as CTI 335, LAH 350)
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LAH 350 / CTI 335/GOV 379S: Jerusalem and Athens

 

Prerequisites: Upper division standing

 

Course Description:

This class is a comparison of the roots of the two traditions that combined to form the modern West: Biblical revelation and classical rationalism. We’ll approach that through careful study of two texts: the early books of the Hebrew Bible and Plato’s Republic.

 

The intent of the course is to compare and contrast the ways in which the two traditions answered some of the most fundamental issues of human life, including the relationship between virtue and happiness, who ought to rule in the political community and on what grounds, and the character of God or the gods. My hope is that we will see this is not the case, and that facing the alternative embodied by Jerusalem and Athens is as urgent and as vital today as it was in the ancient world.

 

We will approach these two traditions through the careful reading of our two source texts. Each class meeting will involve discussion in which all students will be expected to participate. Papers will typically involve comparisons between the two works.

Grading Policy:

60%: 3 medium length (5-7 page) papers:

20%: Short (1 page) writing assignments – 8 over the course of the semester

20%: Attendance, participation, and pop reading quizzes

Texts:

Plato’s Republic (translated by Allan Bloom)

The Five Books of Moses (Robert Alter’s translation of the Torah)

 

 

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