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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Zoltan Barany

Professor Ph.D., University of Virginia

Professor, Frank C. Erwin, Jr. Centennial Professor
Zoltan Barany

Contact

Biography

Professor Barany’s research and writing have focused on military politics, military sociology, and democratization globally throughout his career.  More recently he has become interested in the monarchy as a form of government in the contemporary world.  His early scholarship was also concerned with ethnopolitics (particularly the Gypsies/Roma) and East European politics more generally. 

Professor Barany’s principal current research project is How Armies Respond to Revolutions and Why? – a book to be published by Princeton University Press.  The central argument of this study is that it is possible to make highly educated guesses, if not outright predictions, regarding the generals’ reaction to revolutions – and thus about the outcome of revolutions – by analyzing a number of domestic and external factors.  The case studies include both single-country revolutions (Cuba, 1959; Iran, 1979) and clusters of revolutions (China and Eastern Europe, 1989; North Africa and the Middle East, 2011) to gauge processes of diffusion.

Professor Barany is the author of The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton, 2012), Democratic Breakdown and the Decline of the Russian Military (Princeton, 2007), The Future of NATO Expansion (Cambridge, 2003), The East European Gypsies: Regime Change, Marginality, and Ethnopolitics (Cambridge, 2001), and Soldiers and Politics in Eastern Europe, 1945-90 (Macmillan, 1993).  He is also the co-editor of five other books: Is Democracy Exportable? (Cambridge, 2009), Ethnic Politics after Communism (Cornell, 2005), Russian Politics (Cambridge, 2001), Dilemmas of Transition (Rowman & Littlefield, 1999), and The Legacies of Communism (Johns Hopkins, 1995).  Professor Barany has published dozens of articles in academic and policy journals including Armed Forces & Societies, Comparative Politics, Ethnic & Racial Studies, Government  & Opposition, Journal of Democracy, Journal of Strategic Studies, Parameters, Policy Review, Political Science Quarterly, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Slavic Review, Strategic Studies Quarterly and World Politics.

Professor Barany has been a National Fellow and the Susan Louise Dyer Peace Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and a NATO Research Fellow.  His work has been supported by the East-West Center in Honolulu, the Ford Foundation, IREX, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, as well as the universities of Edinburgh and Oxford in the United Kingdom.  He has lectured at over 150 universities, government agencies, and military institutions around the world.  He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (New York) and the International Institute for Strategic Studies (London).

Interests

military politics and sociology, democratization, monarchies

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

37844 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WAG 101
show description

America and the Cold War

 

Instructor: Prof. Barany                          

Office: Batts 3.156                                  

Office hours: M/W: 1:30-3                        

 

The Cold War lasted for nearly five decades spanning most of the second half of the Twentieth Century and had a major impact on the lives of virtually everyone in that period, including the generations of your parents and grand parents.  What were the origins of the Cold War?  Who were its main protagonists?  What were the most important events and how did they impact upon the final outcome?  Obviously the U.S. and the Soviet Union were the main protagonists but the side stories – developments in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, the Middle East signified an important backdrop to the contest between the two nuclear superpowers that must be kept in mind.   

 

The objective of this course is to familiarize beginning undergraduate students with the main actors, events, and developments and to stimulate an appreciation of the complexities and nuances of international politics of this important era that continues to have a major impact on contemporary world politics.  At the end of the semester you will be able to intelligently discuss the political history of U.S.-Soviet relations and the Cold War in all major world regions.  We will begin with a thorough examination of the Cold War’s origins and then follow events, mostly through the eyes of American presidents from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to George Bush, Sr.  The disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991 is the course’s end-point.

 

There are three non-cumulative midterm exams, weekly pop quizzes, and a group video project (a five-minute film about a key event, personality, or aspect of the Cold War that you will create in a group of four or five students).  In addition, students have the option of reviewing a book that was previously cleared with the Instructor or the TA.  The book review should be between no more than four (4) double-spaced pages and must be a critical assessment of the volume not a summary.

 

Grading:

 

Midterm 1:          20                         15

Midterm 2:           20                         15

Midterm 3:          30                          25

10 pop quizzes:  20                         20

Film project:       10                          10

                                                             é

If taking the book review option:   15

 

Assigned book:

 

John Lewis Gaddis, The Cold War: A New History (New York: Penguin Press, 2005)

GOV 365N • Military In Politics

38059 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 500pm-630pm PAR 1
show description
The Military in Politics

 

GOV 365N, 38059

Spring 2015/PAR 1/M/W 5-6:30

Department of Government

Instructor: Prof. Zoltan Barany (barany@austin.utexas.edu)

Office: BAT 3.156/Office hours: M/W 1:30-3

 

What social and political role do the armed forces play in the modern state and society?  What are the hallmarks of democratic civil-military relations?  Can the armed forces play a progressive social role?  Do generals in power ever promote economic development or should they be expected to loot the country they rule?  And, ultimately, why do people with guns obey those without?  The purpose of this course is to seek answers to these and other age-old questions and to acquaint the advanced undergraduate student with the military's role in the modern state and society.  To prevent misunderstandings: the class does not deal with weapon systems, nuclear proliferation, strategy, or tactics.  Rather, we focus on the sociopolitical character of the armed forces in a variety of political settings: advanced democracies, authoritarian states, post-communist systems, etc.

 

In the first half of the class we are going to be learning about the armed forces of the United States, then, in the second half, we will broaden our horizons and look at armies and politics in the rest of the world.  My goal is to have you leave this class in May as someone who can intelligently discuss the political and societal role of the armed forces in a number of different contexts.  I respect you enough to have high expectations because I assume that as students at the University of Texas at Austin you want to satisfy high standards.  We will also have fun, viewing a couple of documentaries with military politics themes and reading books that you will not just learn from but, I hope, enjoy.

 

There will be a one-hour examination on April 1 that will test your knowledge of the materials. This test will be a combination of multiple-choice and one essay question (you will pick one out of three).  Other than this, the most important assignment is the 10-12-page analytical research paper that should be informed by at least 10 different sources (books, articles, etc.).  It should answer a clear research question, should be structurally sound and the argument(s) should be built to follow logical reasoning.  It should be analytical and feature relatively little descriptive material (i.e., ask not “how?” ask instead “why?”).  We will, of course, discuss the best way to approach your paper in class and in office hours.

 

Prerequisite: For Juniors and Seniors

      Grading

 

1. first midterm examination                                             25%                           

2. second midterm examination                          25%

3. pop quizzes                                                          10%

4. class participation                                                          15%

5. research paper and its in-class presentation           25%

 

 

Required Readings

 

Bacevich, Andrew. Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country (Picador, 2014). ISBN: 1250055385

 

Barany, Zoltan. The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton University Press, 2012). ISBN: 0691137692

 

Owens, Mackubin Thomas. US Civil-Military Relations After 9/11: Renegotiating the Civil-Military Bargain (Bloomsbury Academic, 2011). ISBN: 1441160836

 

… and selected articles for the classes on the armed forces of the Muslim world

GOV 398T • Supv Teaching In Government

39150 • Fall 2014
Meets M 900am-1200pm BAT 1.104
show description

SUPERVISED TEACHING IN GOVERNMENT

 

Course Description

 

In a practical sense this seminar should be the most useful that you will take during your graduate student career and completing it will improve your chances on the job market.  Perhaps less importantly, this class is also a requirement for those wanting to teach their own courses at the University of Texas as Assistant Instructors. 

 

The purpose of this class is to boost your confidence and enhance your effectiveness as a teacher of college-level classes and to socialize you into the academic world.  We will focus on designing a syllabus, developing your teaching philosophy, lecturing effectively, leading engaging discussions, heading off problems with students, learning from student feedback, an also think and talk about grading, challenges specific to teaching political science, and dealing with controversial issues.  We will also discuss the best ways to prepare for the job market, how to give an effective job talk and present yourself at a job interview, and ways of getting along with colleagues in departments small and large.  Finally, we will have opportunities to discuss the broader career issues social science professors face.  If at the end of this course you will be more comfortable and self-assured in the classroom and ready to become a faculty member, we will have succeeded. 

 

I encourage you to get involved with the Center for Teaching and Learning.  (http://ctl.utexas.edu/).  If you would like to pursue further training as an instructor following this course, you might want to check out their Graduate Student Instructor Program (http://ctl.utexas.edu/programs-and-services/graduate-student-instructor-programs/) which may lead to a Certificate. 

 

Required reading

 

Lang, James M. 2008. On Course: A Week-by-Week Guide to Your First Semester of

College Teaching. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (L)

 

Recommended readings:

 

Bain, Ken. 2004. What the Best College Teachers Do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard            University Press. (B)

McKeachie, Wilbert, and Marilla Svinicki. 2006. McKeachie's Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers.  New York:

Houghton Mifflin, 12th edition. (M & S)

 

If I come across short articles as the semester progresses I may ask you to read them.  You, too, should feel free to bring to our attention articles you think we should discuss.

 

 

Course Requirements

 

This class is for credit/no credit (i.e., no letter grade) only.  Course-work at or above 80% merits "credit;" below that, "no credit."  The main components of your performance are:

 

Seminar participation: Obviously this course is based on your active participation.  You all have ideas about good and bad teaching, what works, what does not, and you will certainly have something insightful things to say about the readings. (30% of your grade)

 

Syllabus design: You will all design a syllabus for an undergraduate lecture course and we will critique them (on September 24). (15% of your grade)

 

Statement of teaching philosophy: A document that you can send to prospective employers once you are on the job market regarding your thoughts on teaching, what it means to you, and the objectives you want to accomplish. (15% of your grade)

 

Two mini-lectures: You will deliver a mini-lecture of 10-15-minute length at the beginning of the semester and another one at the end.  The class will constructively evaluate your teaching and we will try to make this as useful to you, the lecturer, as possible.  (40% of your grade)

GOV 398T • Supv Teaching In Government

39455 • Fall 2013
Meets M 900am-1200pm BAT 1.104
show description

Course Description

In a practical sense this seminar should be the most useful that you will take during your graduate student career and completing it will improve your chances on the job market.  Perhaps less importantly, this class is also a requirement for those wanting to teach their own courses at the University of Texas as Assistant Instructors. 

The purpose of this class is to boost your confidence and enhance your effectiveness as a teacher of college-level classes and to socialize you into the academic world.  We will focus on designing a syllabus, developing your teaching philosophy, lecturing effectively, leading engaging discussions, heading off problems with students, learning from student feedback, an also think and talk about grading, challenges specific to teaching political science, and dealing with controversial issues.  We will also discuss the best ways to prepare for the job market, how to give an effective job talk and present yourself at a job interview, and ways of getting along with colleagues in departments small and large.  Finally, we will have opportunities to discuss the broader career issues social science professors face.  If at the end of this course you will be more comfortable and self-assured in the classroom and ready to become a faculty member, we will have succeeded. 

I encourage you to get involved with the Center for Teaching and Learning.  (http://ctl.utexas.edu/).  If you would like to pursue further training as an instructor following this course, you might want to check out their Graduate Student Instructor Program (http://ctl.utexas.edu/programs-and-services/graduate-student-instructor-programs/) which may lead to a Certificate. 

 

Grading Policy

This class is for credit/no credit (i.e., no letter grade) only.  Course-work at or above 80% merits "credit;" below that, "no credit."  The main components of your performance are:

Seminar participation: Obviously this course is based on your active participation.  You all have ideas about good and bad teaching, what works, what does not, and you will certainly have something insightful things to say about the readings. (30% of your grade)

Syllabus design: You will all design a syllabus for an undergraduate lecture course and we will critique them (on September 24). (15% of your grade) 

Statement of teaching philosophy: A document that you can send to prospective employers once you are on the job market regarding your thoughts on teaching, what it means to you, and the objectives you want to accomplish. (15% of your grade)

Two mini-lectures: You will deliver a mini-lecture of 10-15-minute length at the beginning of the semester and another one at the end.  The class will constructively evaluate your teaching and we will try to make this as useful to you, the lecturer, as possible.  (40% of your grade)

 

Texts

Required:

Lang, James M. 2008. On Course: A Week-by-Week Guide to Your First Semester of

College Teaching. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (L)

Recommended readings:

Bain, Ken. 2004. What the Best College Teachers Do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard            University Press. (B)

McKeachie, Wilbert, and Marilla Svinicki. 2006. McKeachie's Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers.  New York:

Houghton Mifflin, 12th edition. (M & S) 

If I come across short articles as the semester progresses I may ask you to read them.  You, too, should feel free to bring to our attention articles you think we should discuss.

 

GOV 365N • Military In Politics

38957 • Spring 2013
Meets M 330pm-630pm MEZ B0.302
show description

Course Description

What social and political role do the armed forces play in the modern state and society?  What are the hallmarks of democratic civil-military relations?  Can the armed forces play a progressive social role?  Do generals in power ever promote economic development or should they be expected to loot the country they rule?  And, ultimately, why do people with guns obey those without?  The purpose of this course is to seek answers to these and other age-old questions and to acquaint the advanced undergraduate student with the military's role in the modern state and society.  To prevent misunderstandings: the class does not deal with weapon systems, nuclear proliferation, strategy, or tactics.  Rather, we focus on the sociopolitical character of the armed forces in a variety of political settings: advanced democracies, authoritarian states, post-communist systems, etc. 

My goal is to have you leave this class in May as someone who can intelligently discuss the political and societal role of the armed forces in a number of different contexts.  I respect you enough to have high expectations because I assume that as students at the University of Texas at Austin you want to satisfy high standards.  We will also have fun, viewing two motion pictures with themes of military politics and reading books that you will not just learn from but, I hope, enjoy.

For the eight meetings when we will discuss readings – 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/4, 3/18, 3/25 – you will prepare one-page discussion proposals (two paragraph-length questions pertaining to the reading for that day) that will serve as a basis for class discussion.  You must e-mail me your questions by midnight on the Sunday before the class.  You will only “keep” your grade for six, so you have two chances to slack off with impunity.

There will be a one-hour examination on April 1 that will test your knowledge of the materials. This test will be a combination of multiple-choice and one essay question (you will pick one out of three).  Other than this, the most important assignment is the 10-12-page analytical research paper that should be informed by at least 10 different sources (books, articles, etc.).  It should answer a clear research question, should be structurally sound and the argument(s) should be built to follow logical reasoning.  It should be analytical and feature relatively little descriptive material (i.e., ask not “how?” ask instead “why?”).  We will, of course, discuss the best way to approach your paper in class and in office hours.

 

Grading

1. six discussion proposals (2.5% each)                  : 15%

2. one-hour exam (April 1)                                    : 35%

3. class participation                                             : 25%

4. research paper (10-12 pages)                            : 25% 

Note: The “Class participation” grade will be taken seriouslybecause the success of this class hinges on it.  This grade will also include an assessment of your presentation, at the end of the semester.  I will not take attendance but, obviously, if you are not present, you cannot participate in the discussions and, therefore, you will be at a disadvantage. 

Rules

1. You may not use a laptop in the classroom.  All electronic devices must be shut off.

2. I will treat you as adults and I want you to treat this class as adults.  I will be in class on time and so should you be.  If you do not think you can make it at 3:30PM, do not register for this class.

3. There will be no extensions for the due dates of any written work. (OK: I might make exceptions if there is a nuclear attack on Austin or a flood of biblical proportions.)

 

Texts

Barany, Zoltan. The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012). ISBN: 0691137692

Dempsey, Jason K. Our Army: Soldiers, Politics, and American Civil-Military Relations (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009). ISBN: 0691142254

Junger, Sebastian. War (New York: Twelve, 2010) ISBN: 0446556246

… and a few selected articles on the armed forces of the Muslim world

  

GOV 390L • The Military In Politics

39140 • Spring 2013
Meets M 930am-1230pm BAT 5.102
(also listed as MES 384 )
show description

Course Description:

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with the military's role in modern state and society.  The focus is on the sociopolitical character of the armed forces.  We will examine the most important issues of civil-military relations, such as why is civilian control important, what types of control arrangements are conducive to healthy civil-military relations in various types of political regimes, and in what ways do military elites respond to state policies and social movements.  The class begins with eight weeks of intensive readings in order to get you grounded in the literature and help you learn to appreciate the diversity of civil-military relations in different political systems.  You will write brief (one single-spaced page) discussion proposals to facilitate debate about the readings.  We will conclude with student presentations (approximately 30-minute summations of your research).  The seminar paper is due at the last seminar meeting (April 29); extensions will not be given save for truly exceptional cases (e.g., unanticipated call-up for combat duty, debilitating illness, etc.).

 

Grading Policy:

8 discussion proposals   (2.5% each)           : 20

seminar participation (including presentation

            of the research paper)                       :  25

research paper (20-25 pages)                      :  55

 

I will assume that as graduate students you will do the readings as assigned.  I want you to immerse yourselves in the books and articles in order to be able to make critical and insightful comments during the seminar meetings.  Since the seminar is based on discussion, without your substantive, engaged participation it will be of little use.

The research paper is the most important requirement of this course.  The paper should be 20 to 25 double-spaced pages in length and should be informed by at least 25 different sources (books, articles, etc.).  The paper should be structurally sound and the argument(s) should be built to follow logical reasoning.  Ideally, it would take advantage of some existing theory to inform its argument(s); it should be analytical and feature relatively little descriptive material (i.e., ask not “how?” ask rather “why?”).

 

Texts:

Barany, Zoltan. Soldiers and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012). ISBN: 0691137692

Barany, Zoltan. Democratic Breakdown and the Decline of the Russian Military (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007). ISBN: 0691128960

Bruneau, Thomas C. and Scott D. Tollefson, eds. Who Guards the Guardians and How: Democratic Civil-Military Relations (University of Texas Press, 2006) ISBN: 0292719248

Dempsey, Jason K. Our Army: Soldiers, Politics, and American Civil-Military Relations (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009). ISBN: 0691142254

Maddow, Rachel. Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power (New York: Crown, 2012).

Nawaz, Suja. Crossed Swords: Pakistan, Its Army, and the Wars Within (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009).

Trinkunas, Harold. Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela: A Comparative Perspective (University of North Carolina Press, 2005) ISBN: 0807856509

 … and some selected articles

 

GOV 398T • Supv Teaching In Government

39010 • Fall 2012
Meets M 900am-1200pm BAT 1.104
show description

Course Description The purpose of this class is to boost your confidence and enhance your effectiveness as a teacher of college-level classes and to socialize you into the academic world.  We will focus on designing a syllabus, lecturing effectively, leading engaging discussions, heading off problems with students, learning from student feedback, an also think and talk about grading, challenges specific to teaching political science, and dealing with controversial issues.  At the same time, we will also discuss the best ways to prepare for the job market, how to give an effective job talk and present yourself at a job interview, and ways of getting along with colleagues in departments small and large.  We will also have opportunities to discuss the broader career issues social science professors face.  If at the end of this course you will be more comfortable and self-assured in the classroom and ready to become a faculty member, we will have succeeded.  

GOV 398T • Supv Teaching In Government

38990 • Fall 2011
Meets M 900am-1200pm BAT 1.104
show description

This seminar is a requirement for those wanting to teach their own courses at the University of Texas as Assistant Instructors.  The purpose of this class is both to boost your confidence and enhance your effectiveness as a teacher and to socialize you into the academic world.  We will focus on designing a syllabus, lecturing effectively, leading engaging discussions, heading off problems with students, and learning from student feedback, etc.  We will also think and talk about grading, challenges specific to teaching political science, and dealing with controversial issues.  At the same time, we will discuss the best ways to prepare for the job market, how to give an effective job talk and present yourself at a job interview, and ways of getting along with colleagues in departments small and large.  We will also have opportunities to discuss the broader career issues social science professors face.  If at the end of this course you will be more comfortable and self-assured in the classroom and ready to become a faculty member, we will have succeeded. 

 

See syllabus for more details.

GOV 365N • Military In Politics

39025 • Spring 2011
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

 

What social and political role do the armed forces play in the modern state and society?

What are the hallmarks of democratic civil-military relations? Can the armed forces play a

progressive social role? Do generals in power ever promote economic development or

should they be expected to loot the country they rule? And, ultimately, why do people with

guns obey those without? The purpose of this course is to seek answers to these and

other questions and to acquaint the advanced undergraduate student with the military's

role in the modern state and society. To prevent misunderstandings: the class does not

deal with weapon systems, nuclear proliferation, strategy, or tactics. Rather, the focus is

on the sociopolitical character of the armed forces in a variety of political settings:

advanced democracies, authoritarian states, and post-socialist systems.

My goal is to have you leave this class in May as someone who can intelligently discuss

the political and societal role of the armed forces in a number of different contexts. I

respect you enough to have high standards because as students at the University of

Texas at Austin you should want to satisfy high expectations. This will be probably one of

the most difficult classes you will take at the University. You will have to deliver two oral

presentations, write an exam, and write a research paper. Quite simply,

to work hard, you should not take this course because you will get a lousy grade

The readings are heavy and you will need to do them for the day they are assigned. For

every meeting you will prepare a one-page discussion proposal (two paragraph-length

questions pertaining to the reading for that day) that will serve as a basis for class

discussion. In addition, together with a fellow student(s), you will have to make a 15-

minute presentation of the main themes of one of the readings once during the semester.

There will be a one-hour examination that will test your knowledge of the materials up to

March 7. This test will be a combination of multiple choice and essay questions. There will

be no final examination. Other than the midterm, the most important assignment is the 12-

15-page analytical research paper that should be informed by at least 15 different sources

(books, articles, etc.). It should answer a clear research question, should be structurally

sound and the argument(s) should be built to follow logical reasoning. It should be

analytical and feature relatively little descriptive material (i.e., ask and answer the question

“why?” rather than “how?”).

2

if you do not want.

Grading

1. seven discussion proposals (2% each) : 14%

2. your collaborative presentation : 6%

3. examination (March 7) : 25%

4. class participation : 20%

5. in-class presentation of your research : 10%

6. research paper (12-15pages) : 25%

Note: The “Class participation” grade will be taken

this class hinges on it. In other words, you may deliver a perfect class presentation, write

fantastic discussion proposals, and submit a publishable research paper, if you do not

participate in the conversation your grade will be B-/C+. I will not take attendance but,

obviously, if you are not present, you cannot participate in the discussions and, therefore,

you’ll be at a major disadvantage.

very seriously because the success of

 

GOV 390L • Military In Politics

39225 • Spring 2011
Meets M 900am-1200pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as LAS 384L, MES 381 )
show description

This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with the military's role in modern 

state and society.  The focus is on the sociopolitical character of the armed forces.  We will 

examine the most important issues of civil-military relations, such as why is civilian control 

important, what types of control arrangements are conducive to healthy civil-military 

relations in various types of political regimes, and in what ways do military elites respond 

to state policies and social movements.  The class begins with eight weeks of intensive 

readings in order to get you grounded in the literature and help you learn to appreciate the 

diversity of civil-military relations in different political systems.  You will write brief (one 

single-spaced page) discussion proposals to facilitate debate about the readings.  We will 

conclude with student presentations (approximately 30-minute summations of your 

research).  The seminar paper is due at the last seminar meeting (May 2); extensions will 

not be given save for exceptional cases (e.g., unanticipated call-up for combat duty, 

debilitating illness, etc.).

GOV 398T • Supv Teaching In Government

38900 • Fall 2010
Meets M 900am-1200pm BAT 1.104
show description

Course Description

This seminar is a requirement for those wanting to teach their own
courses at the University of Texas as Assistant Instructors.  The
purpose of this class is both to enhance your confidence and
effectiveness as a teacher and to socialize you into the academic
world.  We will focus on designing a syllabus, lecturing effectively,
leading engaging discussions, heading off problems with students, and
learning from student feedback, etc.  We will also think and talk
about grading, challenges specific to teaching political science, and
dealing with controversial issues.  At the same time, we will discuss
the best ways to prepare for the job market, how to give an effective
job talk and present yourself at a job interview, and ways of getting
along with colleagues in departments small and large.  We will also
have opportunities to discuss the broader career issues social science
professors face.  If at the end of this course you will be more
comfortable and self-assured in the classroom and ready to become a
faculty member, we will have succeeded.


Grading Policy/Course Requirements

This class is for credit/no credit (i.e., no letter grade) only.  
Course-work at or above 80% merits "credit;" below that, "no credit."  
The main components of your performance are:

Seminar participation: Obviously this course is based on your active
participation.  You all have ideas about good and bad teaching, what
works, what does not, and you will certainly have something insightful
to say about the readings. (50% of your grade)

Syllabus design: You will all design a syllabus for an undergraduate
lecture course and we will constructively critique them (the meeting
on October 5 will be in large part devoted to this task). (25% of your
grade)

Mini-lecture: You are required to deliver a mini-lecture of
10-15-minute length on November 2 or 9.  The class will constructively
evaluate your teaching and we will try to make this as useful to you,
the lecturer, as possible.  (25% of your grade)


Textbooks/Readings

I recommend – but do not require – that you purchase the main book for
this course:

McKeachie, Wilbert, and Marilla Svinicki. 2010. McKeachie's Teaching
Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University
Teachers.  New York: Wadsworth, 13th edition.

Additional readings appear under the class schedule and are available
on line.  If I come across additional readings of interesting I may
assign them as the semester progresses.  Likewise, if you happen upon
an article that you think would benefit our discussions feel free to
bring it to our attention.



Publications

Barany, Z. (2009) Is Democracy Exportable? Cambridge University Press.

Barany, Z. (2009) Building Democratic Armies. In Z. Barany & R.G. Moser (Eds.), Is Democracy Exportable? Cambridge University Press.

Barany, Z. (2008, June) Civil-Military Relations and Institutional Decay: Explaining Russian Military Politics. Europe-Asia Studies, 60(4), 583-606.

Barany, Z. (2008, March) Superpresidentialism and the Military. Presidential Studies Quarterly, 38(1), 14-38.

Barany, Z. (2008, February) Resurgent Russia? A Still-Faltering Military. Policy Review, 147, 39-51.

Barany, Z. (2007, December) The Politics of Russia's elusive defense reform. Political Science Quarterly, 121(4), 597-627.

Barany, Z. (2007) Democratic Breakdown and the Decline of the Russian Military. Princeton University Press.

Barany, Z. (2006, March) NATO. International Studies Review, 8(1), 165-178.

Barany, Z. (2005) Ethnic Politics after Communism. Cornell University Press.

Barany, Z. (2005) Ethnic Mobilization in the Post-Communist Context. In Z. Barany & R.G. Moser (Eds.), Ethnic Politics after Communism (pp.78-110). Cornell University Press.

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