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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Bruce Buchanan

Professor Ph.D., Yale University

Bruce Buchanan

Contact

Biography

Professor Buchanan's specialties include the presidency, American politics, American national institutions, and federal public policy. He is a presidential scholar and a political analyst whose commentary on the presidency and American politics appears in national and international print and broadcast news media. He served as the director of research for the Markle Foundation studies of the 1988, 1992, and 1996 presidential elections. His presidency research is concerned with how to make the institution both more effective and more democratic. This concern is reflected in each of his books, which include "The Presidential Experience" (Prentice- Hall, 1978), "The Citizen's Presidency" (Congressional Quarterly, 1987), "Electing A President" (Texas, 1991), "Renewing Presidential Politics" (Rowman and Littlefield, 1996), "The State of the Presidency" (ed. LBJ School/Library 2002), "Presidential Campaign Quality" (Prentice- Hall, 2004) and "The Policy Partnership" (Routledge, 2004). He is currently conducting research on how Americans judge presidents, and is writing a book on presidential accountability. A chapter from that book entitled "Presidential Accountability for Wars of Choice," is available here.

Read recent papers.

Interests

Presidential and American politics, American institutions, public policy and political behavior

GOV 330K • The American President

37890 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.130
show description

Course Purpose

 

This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

 

Course Description   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

 

  1. Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

            3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential History

 

B.  Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured?   

 

 

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

 

  1. Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

 

D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

                                                           Student Responsibilities

 

  1. Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)
  2. Combination take-home final/mini-term paper (40% of grade)
  3. Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade—five points--per subsequent absence).

            Note:  Pluses and Minuses will not be used for final course grades.

 

 

                                                               Required Readings

 

 

J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

GOV 381L • The American Presidency

38114 • Spring 2015
Meets TH 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
show description

Course Content and Aims This course is cross-listed in the Government Department and the LBJ School, which reflects its theory-practice orientation. Course topics and readings offer an overview of the interdisciplinary field of presidency studies. The questions that integrate the topics covered are “What is the mission of the presidency”  “How does the institution work?” (i.e., what structures and processes serve the mission?)  “What is presidential leadership and what makes it effective?”(e.g., Case examples of good, fair and poor presidential performance).  “What is the state of scholarly research on these and other relevant topics?”  The course has three aims: To provide an introduction to the major literature on the presidency, to identify and address enduringly important research and practice questions about the institution and its central figure, and to sharpen student problem clarification, writing, deliberation and presentation skills. Required Readings The following titles have been ordered through the Co-op:

 

Morris, Irwin L.  2010. The American Presidency:  An Analytical Approach.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Nelson, M. 2014. The Presidency and the Political System. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 10th ed. Greenstein, F.2009 The Presidential Difference, 3rd ed. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Ippolito, Dennis S.  2003.  Why Budgets Matter.  University Park, PA:  Pennsylvania State University Press.

Neustadt, R.E. 1990. Presidential Power. New York: Free Press, 4th ed

 

Additional required readings in Readings Packet (designated “RP” on syllabus) and on this course’s Canvas site (designated CV on syllabus).  The RP will be available at Abel’s Copying. You are also expected to be up-to-date on major presidential news.

 

 

 

Student Responsibilities

1. Six 'reaction' papers. (30%) 3-5 pages, (assigned questions are starred * on outline)

2.  Presentation (with handouts) on outside readings: book or two articles (20%) 3. Final paper. (15%) Topic depends on student objectives. 4. Final paper presentation (15%) 5. Verbal participation (20%) in seminar discussions. Topics, Dates, Paper Assignments I. Introduction

A. Requirements; The Functions of the Presidency; Presidency Theory and Practice(1/22)

B. Presidential Leadership in Comparative Perspective: Research and Practice (1/29) * (What is presidential leadership? presidency research? How do/should they relate?)

II. History, Presidential Accountability and the Constitution

A. History: Theories and Cases (2/5) B. The Presidential Accountability System (PAS) and the Constitution (2/12)

*(How well does the PAS support the Constitution?)

III. The Operational Presidency

A. Managing the White House (2/19)

B. Domestic Policy Leadership (3/5) C. Presidential Influence in Congress (3/12) *(identify and assess the tools of policy leadership) D. The Budget and Economic Policy (3/26) E. Foreign Policy/National Security (4/2) *(Appraise President Obama’s performance to date in economic and foreign policy)

IV. Classic Theoretical Perspectives

A. Presidential Power (4/9) B. Presidential Character (4/16) *(compare Neustadt/Barber/Buchanan visions of presidential leadership)

V. The Presidency and the People

A. Presidential Selection (4/23) B. Media and Communications (4/30) C. Public Opinion and Performance Evaluation (5/7)    *(Appraise the core interactions between presidents and citizens).

VI. Final Paper Presentations (TBA)

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38740 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Course Purpose This course seeks to help you do better the two things citizens must do well if the presidency is to work:  choose and judge presidents.  It tries to offer useful answers to the question, “Where should I look and what should I look for to better choose and judge?”  The concepts and information presented are similar to those found in other presidency courses, but with one important difference.  Here they are subordinated to the citizen’s-eye-view of the presidency and tested for relevance to the evaluation of presidential performance and presidential candidate qualifications.

 

Course Organization   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

 

A.  Presidential Precedents How do past presidents (and national experience, and changing circumstances) influence the way an incumbent chief executive performs and is judged?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

             3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson                          

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential   History

 

B.  Current Presidential Operations  What is the president's "job description", and how can we tell if the incumbent is performing well?

 

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

 

C.  Evaluating Presidential Candidates.  What are the reasons for preferring one presidential candidate to another?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

 

D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

                                                           Student Responsibilities

 

            1.  Attendance is required.  More than three absences=lower course grade (one-half letter                  grade reduction for each absence after 3).

 

            2. Make-up exams are for emergencies only, not for scheduling convenience.  Eligibility will be determined on a case-by-case basis.  Students facing emergencies must notify the instructor or a T.A. before missing an exam unless it is physically impossible.

 

            3.  Unexcused absences from any scheduled exam may result in a score of zero for that exam. 

                                                                 Grading Criteria

 

2 multiple choice mid-term examinations                                       30% each

1 mixed-mode (multiple choice and essay) final exam,                    40%

Note:  Pluses and minuses will not be used for final course grades

 

                                                               Required Readings

 

J.A. Pika, and J.A. Maltese. 2013.  The Politics of the Presidency, (8th Edition).

 

M. Nelson, ed. 2012. The Evolving Presidency. (4th Edition).

 

One national daily newspaper:  e.g., The Washington Post, New York Times, or  Wall Street Journal

GOV 370L • Leader/Follower In Am Polit

39000 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm BEN 1.108
show description

GOV 370L

Leaders and Followers in American Politics

Fall 2014 topic:  Presidential Power and Accountability

 

Course Description

 

 

 

Professor Bruce Buchanan

Fall, 2014

 

Course Prerequisite

 

Upper-division standing

 

Course Content and Objectives

 

            Presidential Power and Accountability is a lecture/discussion course whose fall 2014 topic is the recent uses and abuses of presidential power.  Its goals are to increase your understanding of the topic while sharpening your thinking, research, writing and speaking skills. All course requirements are aimed at helping you to achieve these goals.

 

Responsibilities

 

                                                            Preconditions

 

  1. 1.    Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by 1/2 letter grade per subsequent absence).
  2. 2.    Daily reading of relevant stories in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal or Washington Post
  3. 3.    Timely completion of news and text reading assignments

           

           

                                                            Graded categories

 

  1. 1.    Mid-Term and Take-Home Final Examinations on common readings, relevant presidential news and instructor presentations (40%)
  2. 2.    Research Project Formal presentation  (25%
  3. 3.    Research Project rough draft and12 page final report (25%)
  4. 4.    Regular participation in discussions (10%)

  

Required Readings  

 

Buchanan, Bruce.  2013.  Presidential Power and Accountability

Savage, Charlie. 2007. Takeover. 

Readings Packet and Blackboard articles TBA.

  

Flag: Writing

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39069 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.126
show description

Prerequisites 

Gov 310L or equivalent

 

Course Description

This course seeks to help you do better the two things citizens must do well if the presidency is to work:  choose and judge presidents.  It tries to offer useful answers to the question, “Where should I look and what should I look for to better choose and judge?”  The concepts and information presented are similar to those found in other presidency courses, but with one important difference.  Here they are subordinated to the citizen’s-eye-view of the presidency and tested for relevance to the evaluation of presidential performance and presidential candidate qualifications.

 

 

Grading Policy

2 multiple choice mid-term examinations 30% each

1 combination essay/multiple choice final exam, 40%

 

Texts 

J.A. Pika, and J.A. Maltese. 2013.  The Politics of the Presidency, (8th Edition). 

M. Nelson, ed. 2012. The Evolving Presidency. (4th Edition).

One national daily newspaper:  e.g., The Washington Post, New York Times, or  Wall Street Journal.

GOV 330K • The American President

39110 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am CLA 1.106
show description

Course Purpose

 

This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

 

Course Organization   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

 

  1. Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

            3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential History

 

B.  Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured?   

 

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

 

  1. Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?

 

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

 

D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

Student Responsibilities

 

  1. Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)
  2. Combination take-home final/mini-term paper (40% of grade)
  3. Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade—five points--per subsequent absence).

  

 Required Readings

J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

39115 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JES A121A
show description

Prerequisites 

Gov 310L or equivalent

 

Course Description

This course seeks to help you do better the two things citizens must do well if the presidency is to work:  choose and judge presidents.  It tries to offer useful answers to the question, “Where should I look and what should I look for to better choose and judge?”  The concepts and information presented are similar to those found in other presidency courses, but with one important difference.  Here they are subordinated to the citizen’s-eye-view of the presidency and tested for relevance to the evaluation of presidential performance and presidential candidate qualifications.

 

 

Grading Policy

2 multiple choice mid-term examinations 30% each

1 combination essay/multiple choice final exam, 40%

 

Texts 

J.A. Pika, and J.A. Maltese. 2013.  The Politics of the Presidency, (8th Edition). 

M. Nelson, ed. 2012. The Evolving Presidency. (4th Edition).

One national daily newspaper:  e.g., The Washington Post, New York Times, or  Wall Street Journal.

 

GOV 370L • Leader/Follower In Am Polit

39315 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.212
show description

Prerequisites

Upper-division standing

 

Course Description

            Presidential Power and Accountability is a lecture/discussion course whose fall 2013 topic is the recent uses and abuses of presidential power.  Its goals are to increase your understanding of the topic while sharpening your thinking, research, writing and speaking skills. All course requirements are aimed at helping you to achieve these goals.

Preconditions

1.    Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by 1/2 letter grade per subsequent absence).

2.    Daily reading of relevant stories in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal or Washington Post

3.    Timely completion of news and text reading assignments

           

Grading Policy

1.    Mid-Term and Take-Home Final Examinations on common readings, relevant presidential news and instructor presentations (40%)

2.    Research Project Formal presentation  (25%

3.    Research Project rough draft and12 page final report (25%)

4.    Regular participation in discussions (10%)

  

Texts

Buchanan, Bruce.  2013.  Presidential Power and Accountability

GOV S330K • The American President

85180 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Prerequisites

Upper division standing

Course Description

This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

Course Organization   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

  1. Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

            3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential   History

 B.  Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality  of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured?    

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

  1. Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

Grading Policy

  1. Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)
  2. Comprehensive two-question essay final examination (40% of grade)
  3. Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade per subsequent absence).

Texts

J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

 

 

GOV 330K • The American President

38779 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am CLA 1.104
show description

Course Description: 

This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

 

Grading Policy:

  1. Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)
  2. Combination take-home final/mini-term paper (40% of grade)
  3. Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade—five points--per subsequent absence).

 

Texts:

J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

 

GOV 381L • The American Presidency

39045 • Spring 2013
Meets W 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description:The course is cross-listed in the Government Department and the LBJ School, which reflects its interdisciplinary and theory-practice orientation. Course topics and readings offer an overview of the interdisciplinary field of presidency studies. The three broad questions that integrate the disparate topics covered are “How does the presidency work?”  “What is presidential leadership and what makes it effective?”  “What is the state of scholarly research on these topics?” The course has three aims: To provide a coherent introduction to the major literature on the presidency, to identify and address enduringly important research and operational questions about the institution and its central figure, and to sharpen student problem clarification, writing, deliberation and presentation skills.

 

Grading Policy:

1. Six 'reaction' papers. (30%) 3-5 pages, (assigned questions are starred * on outline)

2.  Two brief presentations (with handouts) on outside readings (20%)3. Final paper. (15%) Topic depends on student objectives. 4. Final paper presentation (15%) 5. Verbal participation (20%) in seminar discussions. 

Texts:Most of the following titles have been ordered through the Co-op: 

Buchanan, Bruce. 2013. Presidential Power and Accountability.  New York:  Routledge.  Available on Blackboard

Morris, Irwin L.  2010. The American Presidency:  An Analytical Approach.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Nelson, M. 2010. The Presidency and the Political System. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 9th ed. Greenstein, F.2009 The Presidential Difference, 3rd ed. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Jones, Charles O. 2005. The Presidency in A Separated System, 2d ed. Washington, D.C.: Brookings. Ippolito, Dennis S.  2003.  Why Budgets Matter.  University Park, PA:  Pennsylvania State University Press.

Neustadt, R.E. 1990. Presidential Power. New York: Free Press, 4th ed

 

Additional required readings in Readings Packet (designated “RP” on syllabus) and on this course’s Blackboard site (designated BB on syllabus).  The RP is available at Speedway Copying in Dobie Mall. You are also expected to be up-to-date on major presidential news.

 

 

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38610 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am WEL 3.502
show description

Course Description

Purpose:

This course seeks to help you do better the two things citizens must do well if the presidency is to work:  choose and judge presidents.  It tries to offer useful answers to the question, “Where should I look and what should I look for to better choose and judge?”  The concepts and information presented are similar to those found in other presidency courses, but with one important difference.  Here they are subordinated to the citizen’s-eye-view of the presidency and tested for relevance to the evaluation of presidential performance and presidential candidate qualifications.

Organization:  

The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics.

A.  Presidential Precedents How do past presidents (and national experience, and changing circumstances) influence the way an incumbent chief executive performs and is judged?

  1. Introduction:  Functions and Values

  2. The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

  3.The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson                          

  4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

          5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

          6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

          7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

          8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

          9.  The Lessons of Presidential   History

B.  Current Presidential Operations  What is the president's "job description", and how can we tell if the incumbent is performing well?

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

C.  Evaluating Presidential Candidates.  What are the reasons for preferring one presidential candidate to another?

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates 

D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

Grading Policy

2 multiple choice mid-term examinations 30% each

1 essay final exam, 40%

- Attendance is required. More than three absences = lower course grade (one-half letter grade reduction for each absence after three).

- Make-up exams are for emergencies only, not for scheduling convenience.  Eligibility will be determined on a case-by-case basis.  Students facing emergencies must notify the instructor or a T.A. before missing an exam unless it is physically impossible 

- Unexcused absences from any scheduled exam may result in a score of zero for that exam.

 

 

Texts

J.A. Pika, and J.A. Maltese. 2013.  The Politics of the Presidency, (8th Edition).

M. Nelson, ed. 2012. The Evolving Presidency. (4th Edition).

One national daily newspaper:  e.g., The Washington Post, New York Times, or Wall Street Journal.

 

Other readings on Blackboard (as indicated on weekly schedule) 

GOV S330K • The American President

85400 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description

 This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

 

Organization: The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

 A.    Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

            3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential   History

 B. Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality  of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured? 

            1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

 C.  Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?

    1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

 D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

 

Grading Policy 

1. Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)

2. Comprehensive two-question essay final examination (40% of grade)

3. Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade per subsequent absence).

 

 Texts

J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

 

 

 

 

 

GOV 330K • The American President

38626 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 3.104
show description

 

Course Purpose

 This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

Course Organization   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

A. Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?            

B. Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality  of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured?     

C. Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?            

                                                           Student Responsibilities

 1.      Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)

2.      Comprehensive two-question essay final examination (40% of grade)

3.      Regular attendance (After 2 “free” absences course grade subject to decrease by ½ letter grade per subsequent absence).   

                                                               Required Readings

 J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2012) The Evolving Presidency, 4th ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

GOV 381L • The American Presidency

38905 • Spring 2012
Meets T 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Content and Aims

The course is cross-listed in the Government Department and the LBJ School, which reflects its theory-practice orientation. Course topics and readings offer an overview of the interdisciplinary field of presidency studies. The three broad questions that integrate the disparate topics covered are “How does the presidency work?”  “What is presidential leadership and what makes it effective?”  “What is the state of scholarly research on these topics?” The course has three aims: To provide a coherent introduction to the major literature on the presidency, to identify and address enduringly important research and practical questions about the institution and its central figure, and to sharpen student problem clarification, writing, deliberation and presentation skills.

Required Books/Readings  Morris, Irwin L.  2010. The American Presidency:  An Analytical Approach.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Nelson, M. 2010. The Presidency and the Political System. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 9th ed.

Kenski, Kate, Bruce W. Hardy, and Kathleen Hall Jamieson.  2010.  The Obama Victory: How Media, Money and Message Shaped the 2008 Election.  New York:  Oxford.

Greenstein, F.2009 The Presidential Difference, 3rd ed. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Jones, Charles O. 2005. The Presidency in A Separated System, 2d ed. Washington, D.C.: Brookings.

Ippolito, Dennis S.  2003.  Why Budgets Matter.  University Park, PA:  Pennsylvania State University Press.

Neustadt, R.E. 1990. Presidential Power. New York: Free Press, 4th ed

Additional required readings in Readings Packet that will be available at Speedway Copying in Dobie Mall. You are also expected to be up-to-date on major presidential news.  

Student Responsibilities

1. Six 'reaction' papers. (30%) 3-5 pages.

2.  Two brief presentations (with handouts) on outside readings (20%)

3. Final paper. (15%) Topic depends on student objectives.

4. Final paper presentation (15%)

5. Verbal participation (20%) in seminar discussions.

GOV 312P • Constitutnl Prins: Core Texts

38651 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Close readings from primary texts that have shaped or that reflect deeply upon American democracy, including the Declaration of Independance, the Federalist Papers, and Tocqueville's Democracy in America.  Fulfills second half of the legislative requirement for government. May be taken for credit only once. Government 312R and 312P may not both be counted for credit.

GOV 370L • Leader/Follower In Am Polit

38863 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SZB 422
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV S330K • The American President

85360 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Purpose  This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

Course Organization   The course is organized into the following three parts and associated lecture topics

A.     Development of the Presidency:  How and why did presidential power grow?  What does presidential history teach the American people to expect of presidents?  How does historical precedent affect current presidential performance? What is the nature of presidential leadership?

            1.  Introduction:  Functions and Values

            2.  The Presidency Defined and Launched: Washington

            3.  The Presidency Democratized:  Jefferson and Jackson

            4.  Presidential Morality and Power:  Polk and Lincoln

            5.  The Presidency Modernized:  TR, Wilson, FDR

            6.  Why Reputations Change:  Truman, Eisenhower, JFK

            7.  The Impact of Vietnam and Watergate:  Johnson and Nixon

            8.  Preliminary Appraisals:  From Ford to Bush II

            9.  The Lessons of Presidential   History

B.  Current Presidential Operations:  What are the responsibilities of the institution and what resources are available to meet them?  What are the “state of the art” strategies for deploying resources to achieve a president’s political and policy objectives?  How can the quality  of a president’s performance in office be reasonably measured?   

             1.  Introduction:  The Grounds for Judgment

            2.  The Campaign for Office

            3.  The Domestic Policy Arena

            4.  Confronting Congress

            5.  Media:  The Classic Dilemma

            6.  The Budget and Economic Policy

            7.  Foreign Policy

            8.  Presidential Competence and the Public Interest

C.     Evaluating Presidential Candidates:  What are the grounds for choice among presidential candidates?  How important is character, relative to issue positions and track-record, in appraising the qualifications of candidates?  How well does the presidential selection system work?

            1.  Introduction:  Five Dimensions of Presidential Leadership

            2.  Candidate Qualifications

            3.  Character:  Avoiding Troubled Candidates

 D.  Course Conclusion:  The Division of Labor

                                                           Student Responsibilities

 1.      Two short-answer essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)

2.      Comprehensive two-question essay final examination (40% of grade)

3.      Regular attendance                                                                  

 

Required Readings

 J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.

M. Nelson, ed. (2008) The Evolving Presidency, 3d ed.

F. Greenstein (2009) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.

Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

GOV 381L • The American Presidency

39130 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

The course is cross-listed in the Government Department and the LBJ School, which reflects its theory-practice orientation. Course topics and readings offer an overview of the interdisciplinary field of presidency studies. The two broad questions that integrate the disparate topics covered are “How does the presidency work?” and “What is presidential leadership and what makes it effective?”  The course has three aims: To provide a coherent introduction to the major literature on the presidency, to identify and address enduringly important questions about the institution and its central figure, and to sharpen student writing, deliberation and presentation skills.

GOV 330K • The American President

84870 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description:
This course explores the nature of presidential leadership through an examination of the leadership strategies of past presidents and the current incumbent.  The goals are to deepen your understanding of how the presidency works and to sharpen your ability to assess the qualifications of candidates and the job performance of presidents.

Grading Policy:
1.     Two essay mid-term examinations (30% of grade each)
2.     Essay final examination (40% of grade)
3.     Regular attendance
 
Textbooks:
J. Pfiffner (2011) The Modern Presidency, 6th ed.
M. Nelson, ed. (2008) The Evolving Presidency, 3d ed.
F. Greenstein (200) The Presidential difference, 3d.ed.
Regular newspaper reading—presidency stories in New York Times, Washington Post or Wall Street Journal.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38730 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 370L • Leader/Follower In Am Pol-W

39315 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 800-930 PAR 306
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Leader/Follower In Am Pol-W

38455 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 301
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

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