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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

David Edwards

Professor Ph.D., Harvard University

David Edwards

Contact

Biography

Professor Edwards teaches political and social theory, American politics, public policy, and international relations. His research interests include the philosophy of social science, noetic sciences, theories of administration, the theory and practice of public policy, international relations theory, American foreign policy, and U.S.- Russian relations. He has been a research associate at the Washington Center of Foreign Policy Research, a visiting professor at New York University, holder of Rockefeller and NATO research fellowships, and a consultant to the Danforth Foundation, the Industrial Management Center, and the Institute for Defense Analyses.

His books include Creating a New World Politics, International Political Analysis, Arms Control in International Politics, The American Political Experience, and Practicing American Politics. He has written for The Nation, The Washington Post, La Quinzaine Litteraire, and other periodicals.

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

37900 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.216
show description

 

 

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

37905 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.208
show description

 

 

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38815 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 1.102
show description

GOV 335M Politics and Reality

 

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

The Readings

 

TBD

 

Flag

 

Writing

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38820 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ B0.302
show description

GOV 335M Politics and Reality

 

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

The Readings

 

TBD

 

Flag

 

Writing

GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

38905 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Course description

International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, even in the absence of events such as terrorist attacks on the homeland, whether we realize this or not, and whether we play any conscious roles in international relations or not.  In fact, as we’ll see this semester, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and things we do in our own lives in turn can have impacts on aspects of international relations.

In this course we’ll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today—among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and spiritual movements.  Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happen as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.

 

Grading Policy

Two in class exams and a final exam, each of which will be part multiple choice and part essay.

 

Texts

 TBD

GOV F360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

84799 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course description: 

International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, even in the absence of events such as terrorist attacks on the homeland, whether we realize this or not, and whether we play any conscious roles in international relations or not.  In fact, as we’ll see this semester, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and things we do in our own lives in turn can have impacts on aspects of international relations.

            In this course we’ll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today—among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and spiritual movements.  Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happen as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.

 

Requirements: 

Probably two in class exams and a final exam, each of which will be part multiple choice and part essay.

 

Reading:

TBD

 

Prerequisites:

None

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

39125 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.216
show description

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

Flag: Writing

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

39130 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.122
show description

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

Flag: Writing

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

39160 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 1.102
show description

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

39165 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

39245 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 1
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Course description

International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, even in the absence of events such as terrorist attacks on the homeland, whether we realize this or not, and whether we play any conscious roles in international relations or not.  In fact, as we’ll see this semester, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and things we do in our own lives in turn can have impacts on aspects of international relations.

In this course we’ll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today—among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and spiritual movements.  Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happen as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.

 

Grading Policy

Two in class exams and a final exam, each of which will be part multiple choice and part essay.

 

Texts

 Textbook, not yet selected, plus daily reading of the N.Y. Times, Monday through Friday throughout the course.

 

GOV S360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

85190 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am BEN 1.124
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Course description

International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, even in the absence of events such as terrorist attacks on the homeland, whether we realize this or not, and whether we play any conscious roles in international relations or not.  In fact, as we’ll see this semester, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and things we do in our own lives in turn can have impacts on aspects of international relations.

In this course we’ll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today—among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and spiritual movements.  Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happen as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.

 

Grading Policy

Two in class exams and a final exam, each of which will be part multiple choice and part essay.

 

Texts

 Textbook, not yet selected, plus daily reading of the N.Y. Times, Monday through Friday throughout the course.

 

 

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38810 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.118
show description

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38815 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38685 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 1.102
show description

Course Description

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

 

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

38770 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Course description

International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, even in the absence of events such as terrorist attacks on the homeland, whether we realize this or not, and whether we play any conscious roles in international relations or not.  In fact, as we’ll see this semester, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and things we do in our own lives in turn can have impacts on aspects of international relations.

In this course we’ll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today—among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and spiritual movements.  Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happen as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.

 

Grading Policy

Two in class exams and a final exam, each of which will be part multiple choice and part essay.

 

Texts

 Textbook, not yet selected, plus daily reading of the N.Y. Times, Monday through Friday throughout the course.

 

GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

38775 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm JGB 2.218
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Course description

International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, even in the absence of events such as terrorist attacks on the homeland, whether we realize this or not, and whether we play any conscious roles in international relations or not.  In fact, as we’ll see this semester, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and things we do in our own lives in turn can have impacts on aspects of international relations.

In this course we’ll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today—among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and spiritual movements.  Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happen as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.

 

Grading Policy

Two in class exams and a final exam, each of which will be part multiple choice and part essay.

 

Texts

 Textbook, not yet selected, plus daily reading of the N.Y. Times, Monday through Friday throughout the course.

 

GOV F335M • Politics And Reality

85298 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am SZB 380
show description

Course Description

    In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

Texts

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38653 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 2.202
show description

    In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

The Readings

The basic readings will be the following three paperbacks available in the Co-op (and likely in used bookstores):

Ronald Laing/The Politics of Experience/Ballantine

Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann/The Social Construction of Reality/Anchor

Owen Barfield/Saving the Appearances/Wesleyan University Press

We will also have supplementary readings from time to time throughout the semester, and the last quarter of the class will consist entirely of such readings.  I shall select these readings as the semester progresses to critique, complement and expand upon the readings listed above.  Most will be available either via the electronic reserve program E-Res administered by the General Libraries (which will give you free access to them and allow you to download them and print them so you can read them and bring them to class) or from a local copyshop.  I'll make specific reading assignments in class from session to session rather than in advance, because specific assignments will depend in part on how the course progresses.

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38655 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 303
show description

Description:

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

Grading: Grading will be based on four essays

Textbooks:

TBA

GOV 310L • American Government

38560 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 1.306
show description

Fulfills first half of legislative requirement for 6 hours of American government.

The basic goal of this course is to develop our understanding of and ability to think critically and creatively about American politics, so that we can be critical consumers of media accounts of politics and effective participants in politics should we choose to do so.

The course will focus on disputes among political actors and among experts over a wide variety of issues, ranging from how government really works to what policies should be adopted to deal with major public problems. We will examine the operation of major American institutions (the presidency, the Congress, the courts, the bureaucracy), examining the inputs into their operations (voters and other activists, parties, interest groups, public opinion, and the mass media), and the outputs (civil liberties, civil rights, and the public policy in areas such as public education, distributive justice, the economy, energy, and foreign affairs). Some of these topics will be examined in the context of Texas politics.

Grading Policy

Two in class Exams and a Final Exam

Texts

A basic text (to be selected) and The New York Times (Monday - Friday)

GOV 310L • American Government

38590 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 0.102
show description

 

Fulfills first half of legislative requirement for 6 hours of American government.

The basic goal of this course is to develop our understanding of and ability to think critically and creatively about American politics, so that we can be critical consumers of media accounts of politics and effective participants in politics should we choose to do so.

The course will focus on disputes among political actors and among experts over a wide variety of issues, ranging from how government really works to what policies should be adopted to deal with major public problems. We will examine the operation of major American institutions (the presidency, the Congress, the courts, the bureaucracy), examining the inputs into their operations (voters and other activists, parties, interest groups, public opinion, and the mass media), and the outputs (civil liberties, civil rights, and the public policy in areas such as public education, distributive justice, the economy, energy, and foreign affairs). Some of these topics will be examined in the context of Texas politics.

Grading Policy

Two in class Exams and a Final Exam

Texts

A basic text (to be selected) and The New York Times (Monday - Friday)

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38690 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BAT 5.102
show description

Description:

In this course we'll be reading and discussing various ideas about why different people experience reality differently, and how the differing ways people experience reality and then act upon that experience can result in changes in reality--for them and for others--over time.  We'll then ask how we and others can use this knowledge to create changes we or they desire.  

    Much of our study will focus on basic aspects of everyday life, especially interpersonal and intergroup relations.  Most of that study will be theoretical, combining aspects of psychology, philosophy, sociology, theology, anthropology, and other aspects of the human sciences.  From time to time, however, we'll also consider some aspects of political action.

Grading: Grading will be based on four essays

Textbooks:

TBA

GOV F360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

85270 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am MEZ B0.306
show description

Upper-division standing required. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, whether we realize it or not. In fact, as we'll see, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and many of the things we do in turn have impacts on aspects of international relations.   In this course, we'll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today - among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and religious/spiritual movements. Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happed as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.   We will pay special attention to the impact that language and presentation have both on the development of international relations and on our beliefs about what happens and why. A central part of this focus will be our continuing close examination of accounts in The New York Times and other media. As a result of this, we should become more effective consumers of media materials.   I have tried to design this course so that it will help you to better understand various ways of learning and thinking about international relations. I am committed to doing what I can to help you achieve this goal. In return, I ask that you commit to doing the required reading on time and coming to class ready to learn, and, when possible, participating in class discussions.

GOV 310L • American Government

38735 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 1.306
show description

See syllabus

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38886 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BAT 5.102
show description

 

 

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality

38891 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 3.116
show description

 

 

GOV 310L • American Government

38370 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

Prerequisites:

12 Semester hours of College Coursework and a passing score on the Reading section of the THEA test (or an appropriate assessment test).
 
Course Description:

Fulfills first half of legislative requirement for 6 hours of American government.
The basic goal of this course is to develop our understanding of and ability to think critically and creatively about American politics, so that we can be critical consumers of media accounts of politics and effective participants in politics should we choose to do so.
The course will focus on disputes among political actors and among experts over a wide variety of issues, ranging from how government really works to what policies should be adopted to deal with major public problems. We will examine the operation of major American institutions (the presidency, the Congress, the courts, the bureaucracy), examining the inputs into their operations (voters and other activists, parties, interest groups, public opinion, and the mass media), and the outputs (civil liberties, civil rights, and the public policy in areas such as public education, distributive justice, the economy, energy, and foreign affairs). Some of these topics will be examined in the context of Texas politics.
 
Grading Policy:

Two in class Exams and a Final Exam
 
Textbooks:

A basic text (to be selected) and The New York Times (Monday - Friday)

GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

38609 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 2.202
show description

Prerequisites:
6 Semester hours of lower-division Coursework in Government.
 
Course Description:
Upper-division standing required. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, whether we realize it or not. In fact, as we'll see, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and many of the things we do in turn have impacts on aspects of international relations.
 
In this course, we'll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today - among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and religious/spiritual movements. Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happed as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.
 
We will pay special attention to the impact that language and presentation have both on the development of international relations and on our beliefs about what happens and why. A central part of this focus will be our continuing close examination of accounts in The New York Times and other media. As a result of this, we should become more effective consumers of media materials.

Class sessions will combine lecture, occasional video and audio segments, varying web-based materials, and discussion.

I have tried to design this course so that it will help you to better understand various ways of learning and thinking about international relations. I am committed to doing what I can to help you achieve this goal. In return, I ask that you commit to doing the required reading on time and coming to class ready to learn, and, when possible, participating in class discussions.
 
Grading Policy:
2 in-class exams and a final exam
 

Textbooks:
 
There are two types of required readings in this course:
(1)    The first is a basic paperback textbook, which has yet to be selected.
(2)    Most of our other reading will be in the daily New York Times, which I expect you to subscribe to at a specially reduced rate. Other required and optional readings will be posted on the website for you to download from time to time.


GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

38610 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ B0.306
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Prerequisites:
6 Semester hours of lower-division Coursework in Government.
 
Course Description:
Upper-division standing required. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, whether we realize it or not. In fact, as we'll see, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and many of the things we do in turn have impacts on aspects of international relations.
 
In this course, we'll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today - among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and religious/spiritual movements. Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happed as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.
 
We will pay special attention to the impact that language and presentation have both on the development of international relations and on our beliefs about what happens and why. A central part of this focus will be our continuing close examination of accounts in The New York Times and other media. As a result of this, we should become more effective consumers of media materials.

Class sessions will combine lecture, occasional video and audio segments, varying web-based materials, and discussion.

I have tried to design this course so that it will help you to better understand various ways of learning and thinking about international relations. I am committed to doing what I can to help you achieve this goal. In return, I ask that you commit to doing the required reading on time and coming to class ready to learn, and, when possible, participating in class discussions.
 
Grading Policy:
2 in-class exams and a final exam
 

Textbooks:
 
There are two types of required readings in this course:
(1)    The first is a basic paperback textbook, which has yet to be selected.
(2)    Most of our other reading will be in the daily New York Times, which I expect you to subscribe to at a specially reduced rate. Other required and optional readings will be posted on the website for you to download from time to time.


GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

84780 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description:
Upper-division standing required. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. International relations have enormous impacts on our daily lives, whether we realize it or not. In fact, as we'll see, many of the things we do in everyday life are influenced by international relations, and many of the things we do in turn have impacts on aspects of international relations.
 
In this course, we'll examine the varying political, military, economic, and cultural phenomena that cross state boundaries in the world today - among them war, diplomatic negotiation, peacekeeping, terrorism, economic relations, ecological problems, cultural exchange, and religious/spiritual movements. Our major interests will be in discovering what actually happens, in examining competing ideas about why things happed as they do, and in considering various ideas about how things could change or be changed.
 
We will pay special attention to the impact that language and presentation have both on the development of international relations and on our beliefs about what happens and why. A central part of this focus will be our continuing close examination of accounts in The New York Times and other media. As a result of this, we should become more effective consumers of media materials.
 
I have tried to design this course so that it will help you to better understand various ways of learning and thinking about international relations. I am committed to doing what I can to help you achieve this goal. In return, I ask that you commit to doing the required reading on time and coming to class ready to learn, and, when possible, participating in class discussions.
 
Grading Policy:
2 in-class exams final exam
 

Textbooks:

Most of your reading assignments will be in the paperback textbook: Kegley: World Politics, twelfth edition (Thomson/Wadsworth, 2008/2009), available new and used in bookstores and on the web.  There are actually two versions of this book; the second, marked “2009-2010 update”, has very few changes in it, so the earlier 12th edition, published in 2008, which is out of print as a new book, but will be much cheaper as a used book, will be quite acceptable.  (Note: There is a brand new edition, called the “2010-2011 edition,” which has been rearranged and revised; DON’T BUY THIS ONE, which will be much more expensive and will be impossible to follow assignments in.)  I’ve also placed a copy of the book on reserve in PCL.  Class session topics and reading assignments, along with scheduled exam dates, are listed at the end of this syllabus.

Most of our other reading will be in the daily New York Times, which I expect you to subscribe to at a specially reduced rate. Other required and optional readings will be posted on the website for you to download. Class sessions will combine lecture, occasional video and audio segments, varying web-based materials, and discussion.

GOV 335M • Politics And Reality-W

38815 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 JES A209A
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GOV 374N • American Government

39000 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm FAC 21
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GOV 374N: POLITICAL INTERNSHIPS

Department of Government

The University of Texas at Austin

Revised: 8/28/09 4:13 PM

INTERNSHIP COORDINATOR: Dr. James Henson

OFFICE: Mezes 2.302E

PHONE: 471-0090

MAILBOX: Mezes 2.302

OFFICE HOURS: Tuesday 3-4
Thursday 3-4

EMAIL: j.henson@austin.utexas.edu

FAX: 471-7718

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Adam Myers

Email: asmyers@austin.utexas.edu

Office: Batts 1.118

Office Hours: M 9:30-11 and Th 2-3:30

COURSE DESCRIPTION – Fall 2009

The Government Department internship program provides students an opportunity to combine work experience in government and politics with intellectual reflection on their experience. Making the most of the course requires interns to work as diligent part-time employees in their positions while reflecting thoughtfully and analytically on their experience in the organizations in which they work.

The general objectives of the internship program are:

  1. To provide students with first-hand experience working in government and politics;
  2. To incorporate this experience into the contexts of their intellectual education at the university and of public expectations of politics and government;
  3. To use interns’ experiences to think about the dynamics of politics and government as features of contemporary society; and
  4. To use interns’ experience to think about the practice of politics as a profession.

Most of students’ time and energy will be directed toward performing the duties of their internships in a manner that reflects positively on them and on The University of Texas at Austin. A solid performance as an intern provides a rich learning experience, the possibility of future intellectual and professional opportunities, and also reflects well on the program, paving the way for future students to have the same opportunities current interns enjoy.

However, interns should be clear about the nature of this course. Students are not receiving credit from the Government Department primarily for fulfilling their internships. Students receive grades and credit for completing the internships in conjunction with guided course work. Supervisor evaluations are taken into account in assigning grades, but the primary consideration in assigning grades is the quality of academic work completed for the course.

ON THE WEB

http://www.laits.utexas.edu/gov_interns

READING MATERIAL

Max Weber, “Politics as a Vocation” (http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Politics_as_a_Vocation, or in print in H.H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills (Translated and edited), From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, pp. 77-128, New York: Oxford University Press.)

Karen Olsson, Waterloo. New York: Picador, 2006. (Available in paperback and is discounted at Amazon.com. If you order ahead from one of their associated vendors, you can get a real deal on a used copy. There are also usually copies in used bookstores around Austin.)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  • 4 mandatory group meetings
  • 3 papers
  • Work hours: 9-12 hours per week, beginning first day of semester, concluding the last regular day of the semester. The minimum total hours worked should 150 hours. How you track this is up to you and your supervisor/employer, but it should be verifiable if necessary.
  • Two evaluations by internship supervisor
  • One video taped exit interview (about 15-30 minutes)
  • 4 Texas Politics Speaker Series attendance (see below, plus times & dates TBA)`
  • Respond to readings on email list as directed

NOTE: all requirements must be fulfilled to receive credit for the course.

GRADE CALCULATION

Writing assignment #1 20%
Writing assignment #2 20%
Writing assignment #3 25%
Mid term supervisor evaluation 10%
Final supervisor evaluation 15%
Exit interview 10%

Students must complete all of the assignments in order to receive a passing grade for the course.

FALL 2009 IMPORTANT DATES

August 26

First day of semester

Your internship should be set up and you should start working this week.

September 3

Organizational class meeting

5 PM, Mezes 2.302

September 15

Class meeting, discuss Weber / first writing assignment

5 PM, Mezes 2.302

Students should have completed Weber reading

September 17

Texas Politics Speaker Series: Carlton Carl, Christy Hoppe, Harvey Kronberg, and Evan Smith

Dean’s Conference Room, Gebauer Building

September 25

First writing assignment due

Printed copy should be turned into Dr. Henson or to the receptionist in Mezes 2.302 by 4:30 pm.

October 22

Class meeting: discuss second writing assignment

5 PM, Mezes 2.302

Students should have Waterloo by Olsson

October 30

Second Writing assignment due

Mid-term supervisor evaluation due

Paper: printed copy should be turned into Dr. Henson or to the receptionist in Mezes 2.302 by 4:30 pm

Evaluation: may be mailed, emailed, or faxed by supervisor to Dr. Henson.

November 16

Money and Politics Conference

AT&T Conference Center, schedule TBA

November 23

Deadline for scheduling exit interviews

Use scheduling tool online at website

November 19

Class meeting – Discuss third assignment

5 PM, Mezes 2.302

November 26-27

THANKSGIVING BREAK

 


Dec 1,2,3

Videotape exit interviews

Arrive 15 minutes early for your sign up time - Mezes 2.206. Reservation tool URL TBA.

Dec 4

Third writing assignment due

Printed copy should be turned into Dr. Henson or to the receptionist in Mezes 2.302 by 4:30 pm

Dec 9

Final Supervisor evaluation due

May be mailed, emailed, or faxed by supervisor to Dr. Henson

WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Assignment 1 (Due: September 25): Situating the Practice of Politics

Length: 1500 words

Value: 20% of final grade

Description: Identify and assess the central elements of “politics as a vocation” in Weber’s essay. Weber wrote this in 1919 -- what are the implications of Weber’s interpretation for contemporary democratic politics? Pay particular attention to implications for contemporary politics in the general area (i.e. the legislature, executive office, campaign professional, etc.) in which you will be an intern.

This assignment is designed to get you to dissect and comprehend Weber’s essay, and to extend it into the contemporary context in which you find yourself. But do not dwell on your specific context of your internship -- the main burden is to convey that you have spent time getting a grasp of the essay, and that you can extend the central arguments and implications of the essay into the present.

Material:

Max Weber, “Politics as a Vocation” (http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Politics_as_a_Vocation, or in print in H.H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills (Translated and edited), From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, pp. 77-128, New York: Oxford University Press.)

Assignment 2 (Due: October 30): Reflecting on Popular Representations of Politics

Length: 1250 words

Value: 20% of grade

Value: 20% of final grade

Description: Read Karen Olsson’s Waterloo and write an essay about the characterization of the professional practice of politics in the novel. How does the novel present ethical choices faced by political professionals in the various roles presented in the book? Organize your essay around an argument for your interpretation of the book’s overall portrayal of politics in Texas.

Assignment 3 (Due: December 4): Assessment of Weber and Your Internship

Length: 1500 words

Value: 25% of final grade

Description:

Assess the lessons of your internship in light of Weber’s understanding of politics as a vocation. Choose three arguments or observations relevant to your experience, and assess (with examples) the degree to which Weber’s description and analysis seems apt for the contemporary practice of politics as you experienced it during your internship. NOTE: this paper should NOT be a rewrite of your first paper.

SUPERVISOR EVALUATIONS

Supervisors must evaluate interns twice, at mid-semester and at the semester’s end. Assessment forms are available at the course website. Your supervisors should either email or mail assessments to the coordinator at jhenson@mail.la.utexas.edu . These evaluations are due by October 30 and December 9.

Interns should provide supervisors with plenty of lead time, and make sure forms are available to them.

VIDEO TAPED EXIT INTERVIEW

Students are required to sit for a recorded video interview during the last week of regular classes. Students will be asked a short set of questions about their experiences in their internships, what they learned, and their reflections on the overall experience. Students will be asked to sign a waiver allowing the use of the videos for instruction of future interns and for use in other instructional settings. Students may choose not to allow the use of their interview, but the interview is still a required assignment.

CLASS EMAIL LIST gov-interns@utlists.utexas.edu

ABOUT THE EMAIL LIST

Students are already subscribed to the class email list. You have probably already received mail unless you were added late or did not provide a current email address when you applied to the program.

An important thing to remember from the outset: if you need to email Dr. Henson, send email directly to his individual address, not to the list.

Messages and announcements posted to the web can also be viewed on the online message board listed above. Follow the directions there to manage you email subscription. I strongly urge students to spend time at the website for the list familiarizing themselves with the options for your subscription. The URL for the list web page is http://muttley.laits.utexas.edu/mailman/listinfo/gov-interns-list

Ground rules for posting to the list are as follows:

  • Material posted to the list should be relevant to the internships program.
  • No personal or commercial messages.
  • Postings taken from other sources must contain citations, whether printed or electronic.
  • Postings must be consistent with the UT policies governing information technology use. (See http://www.utexas.edu/cc/policies/responsible.html)

Non-compliance with these guidelines will result in the loss of posting privileges. Dr. Henson reserves the right to modify these guidelines.

Suggestions for using the list:

  • Pause before sending messages, and:
    • Think about whether the tone and content of your message are appropriate to the list.
    • Think about whether it is necessary for everyone on the list to read your message. It might be more appropriate to send the message directly to an individual.
  • Use the subject line to provide substantive information to recipients (for example, "Question about class meeting," "Film interpretation assignment,")
  • Spell-check mailings for the sake of clarity.
  • If you use your own computer and a mail program that allows it, keep messages you want to save in a folder created for list messages. If there’s a spurt of messages in which you are only marginally interested, it will reduce your irritation.
  • In general, be civil. Avoid being snotty and/or rude. Expecting clarity and intellectual honesty is neither rude nor snotty; belittling someone else, or being excessively impatient with them, because they have not lived up to your standards of these criteria, is snotty, usually feels rude, and violates norms of civility.

NOTE: these boilerplate guidelines are class policy, but were written with larger classes of freshman and sophomores in mind. Interns are strongly encouraged to use the email list to discuss their experiences with the rest of the class and to share information and lessons learned.

GOV 310L • American Government

39030 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WEL 2.246
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

38110 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 UTC 2.112A
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

38125 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

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