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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Eric McDaniel

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Eric McDaniel

Contact

Biography

Professor McDaniel specializes in American politics. His research areas include religion and politics, Black politics, and organizational behavior. His work targets how and why Black religious institutions choose to become involved in political matters. In addition, his work targets the role of religious institutions in shaping Black political behavior.

Recent Publications:
2008. Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

GOV 310L • American Government

38715 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 830am-1000am
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GOV 310L AMERICAN GOVERNMENT - WB

Eric McDaniel & Bethany Albertson 

 

Prerequisites

 

6 hours of college course-work.  This course fulfills the first half of the legislative requirement for Government.

 

Course Description

 

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the processes and issues of United States and Texas government.  The course will cover the relevant institutions in the development of the governmental process as well as discuss the role of the citizens in shaping our government.

 

Mandatory course meetings take place online during scheduled class times, via live-streaming video. Students will be responsible for using their own devices and using an appropriate Internet connection, or for accessing the course from a campus computer lab.  Students are strongly encouraged to visit the following page http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/gov310l/ to test their computer and network connection.

 

Topics:

 

I.             Introduction to the Study of Politics

II.            Pre-constitutional America

III.           The Constitution

IV.          Federalism

V.            Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

VI.          Interest Groups

VII.         Political Parties

VIII.        The Congress

IX.           The President (and Bureaucracy)

X.            The Courts

XI.           Texas Government

XII.         The News Media

XIII.        Public Opinion and Voting Behavior

XIV.        Campaigns and Elections

XV.         Economic policy

XVI.        Social Welfare Policy

XVII.      Foreign Policy

  

Grading Policy

 

Grades will be based on the following breakdown:

 

Weekly Quizzes                (Thirteen in all; each worth 10 points; drop the three low scores)              100 points

Take-home Essays           (Three in all; each worth 50 points)          150 points

Participation/Simulations                             50 points

TOTAL                   300 points

                       

 

Texts

 

Ken Kollman, 2013. “The American Political System,”. New York: Norton.

 

The Texas portion of the course will be covered through free material provided on the Texas Politics website (http://texaspolitics.laits.utexas.edu/index.html)

GOV 381J • Pol Institutions And Processes

39035 • Fall 2014
Meets W 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
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Course Description

This seminar introduces graduate students to the study of American political institutions. The course reviews both classic and recent scholarship on issues in related to political institutions. The readings address a range of topics regarding the definition and study of institutions along with an in depth analysis of specific institutions in American politics.  

 

Classes will be devoted to intensive reading and critical discussion of the literature (and related scholarship) of that week’s topic. Discussion will be of the works read for that day as well as other approaches and scholarship on related issues. 

 

Short Papers (30% of grade)

Participation (35% of grade)

Take-Home Final (40% of grade)

 

Preliminary Texts Required Texts

1.       Shepsle, Kenneth A. 2010. Analyzing Politics: Rationality, Behavior, and Institutions. New York: W.W. Norton. ISBN-10:0393935078

2.       Baumgartner, Frank R., and Bryan D. Jones. 1993. Agendas and Instability in American Politics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN-10: 0226039498

3.       Elkins, Zachary, Tom Ginsburg, and James Melton. 2009. The endurance of national constitutions. New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN-10: 0521731321

4.       Cox, Gary W., and Mathew D. McCubbins. 2007. Legislative Leviathan: Party Government in the House. Cambridge. New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN-10: 0521694094

5.       Beckmann, Matthew N. 2010. Pushing the Agenda: Presidential Leadership in U.S. Lawmaking, 1953-2004. New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN-10: 0521162912

6.       Krehbiel, Keith. 1998. Pivotal Politics: A Theory of U.S. Lawmaking. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN-10: 0226452727

7.       Aldrich, John Herbert. 2011. Why Parties? : A Second Look. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN-10: 0226012743

8.       Philpot, Tasha S. 2007. Race, Republicans, and the Return to the Party of Lincoln. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. ISBN-10: 0472069675

GOV 310L • American Government

39010-39012 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 830am-1000am
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Prerequisites

 12 hours of college course-work.  This course fulfills the first half of the legislative requirement for Government.

Course Description

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the processes and issues of United States and Texas government.  The course will cover the relevant institutions in the development of the governmental process as well as discuss the role of the citizens in shaping our government.

Mandatory course meetings take place online during scheduled class times, via live-streaming video. Students will be responsible for using their own devices and using an appropriate Internet connection, or for accessing the course from a campus computer lab.  Students are strongly encouraged to visit the following page (http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/gov310L/) to test their computer and network connection.

Topics:

 

I.                 Introduction to the Study of Politics

II.                Pre-constitutional America

III.              The Constitution

IV.               Federalism

V.                Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

VI.              Interest Groups

VII.             Political Parties

VIII.           The Congress

IX.              The President (and Bureaucracy)

X.               The Courts

XI.              Texas Government

XII.            The News Media

XIII.          Public Opinion and Voting Behavior

XIV.           Campaigns and Elections

XV.            Economic policy

XVI.           Social Welfare Policy

XVII.          Foreign Policy

Grading Policy

 

Grades will be based on the following breakdown:

 

Weekly Quizzes

(Thirteen in all; each worth 10 points; drop the three low scores)   

100 points

Take-home Essays

(Three in all; each worth 50 points)

150 points

Participation/Simulations

 

50 points

TOTAL

 

300 points

Texts

Ken Kollman, 2013. “The American Political System,” 2012 Election Update. New York: Norton.

 

The Texas portion of the course will be covered through free material provided on the Texas Politics website (http://texaspolitics.laits.utexas.edu/index.html)

GOV 310L • American Government

39060 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 830am-1000am
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Prerequisites

6 hours of college course-work.  This course fulfills the first half of the legislative requirement for Government.

 

Course Description

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the processes and issues of          United States and Texas government.  The course will cover the relevant institutions in the development of the governmental process as well as discuss the role of the citizens in shaping our government. 

Course meets online during scheduled class times and includes a live-streaming video component. Arrangements to meet in groups in the broadcast studio (MEZ 2.206) may be made by the instructors at the beginning of class.  Students will be required to access the course online during meeting times, and will be responsible for using their own devices and using an appropriate Internet connection, or for accessing the course from a campus computer lab.  Students are strongly encouraged to visit the following page (http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/gov310L/) to test their computer and network connection.

Topics:

I.                 Introduction to the Study of Politics

II.                Pre-constitutional America

III.              The Constitution

IV.               Federalism

V.                Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

VI.              Interest Groups

VII.             Political Parties

VIII.           The Congress

IX.              The President (and Bureaucracy)

X.               The Courts

XI.              Texas Government

XII.            The News Media

XIII.          Public Opinion and Voting Behavior

XIV.           Campaigns and Elections

XV.            Economic policy

XVI.           Social Welfare Policy

XVII.          Foreign Policy

 

Grading Policy

Grades will be based on the following breakdown:

Weekly quizzes                                                        

(Twelve in all; each worth 10 points; drop the two low scores)   

100 points

Take-home Essays

(Three in all; each worth 50 points)

150 points 

Participation/Attendance 

50 points

TOTAL

300 points

 

                               

Texts

Ken Kollman, 2013. “The American Political System,” 2012 Election Update. New York: Norton.

The Texas portion of the course will be covered through free material provided on the Texas Politics website (http://texaspolitics.laits.utexas.edu/index.html

GOV 370L • The Politics Of Health Care

39307 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 1.106
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Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 310L • American Government

38664 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am JES A121A
show description

See syllabus

GOV 370K • Black Church In Afr Amer Pol

38977 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am JES A303A
show description

See syllabus

GOV 310L • American Government

38565 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am JES A121A
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Prerequisites

At least six college level credit hours.

 

Course Description 

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the processes and issues of United States and Texas government. The course will cover the relevant institutions in the development of the governmental process as well as discuss the role of the citizens in shaping our government.

 

Grading Policy 

Quizzes: 25%

Exams: 75%

 

Texts 

Kollman, Ken. 2012. The American Political System. New York: W. W. Norton and Company.

 

GOV 381J • Pol Institutions And Processes

38885 • Fall 2012
Meets W 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
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Course Description

 This seminar introduces graduate students to the study of American politics and government.   The course reviews both classic and recent scholarship on issues in American political science.  The readings address a range of topics, from questions of democracy, the political system, and political culture, to ones of particular aspects of American politics, such as public opinion, partisanship, Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.  Students read what political scientists have written (and argued) about the different topics related to political science on the United States.  What are the implications of how political scientists have worked as professionals?  Of special concern are the controversies within the discipline: where do political scientists disagree, and why? 

 

Texts 

Aldrich, John, Why Parties?  Chicago. 

Other books to be announce later.

GOV 310L • American Government

38510 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am JES A121A
show description

Course DescriptionThis course is designed to provide an introduction to the processes and issues of United States and Texas government. The course will cover the relevant institutions in the development of the governmental process as well as discuss the role of the citizens in shaping our government.

 Required Texts1 Kollman, Ken. (2011). The American Poltical System. New York, Norton.2. Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard {BB}.3. Bluebooks and #2 pencils for exams

 Films (Preliminary List)

1.Belton, David. 2010. "A New Eden." In God In America, ed. David Belton. Boston: WGBH Educational Foundation.

The purpose of this film is to establish an understanding of how religion was approached in the early years of the nation. My showing of this film is not an attempt to indoctrinate any thinking about how religion should operate in America. When watching this film pay particular attention to the discussion of separation of church and state as well as the discussion of religious freedom.

2.Espinosa, Paul. 1985. The Lemon Grove Incident. Espinosa Productions.The purpose of this film is to provide a vivid example of how the nation has come to define civil rights. When watching this film pay special attention to the cause of the conflict, how the decision was contested, the final outcome and the logic behind the final outcome.

 

 Coursework

Quizzes 25%Throughout the semester there will be numerous quizzes given, which will pertain to the readings as well as class lectures.  The quizzes will not be announced and there will be no make-ups for missed quizzes. The quizzes will be given at any time during the lecture. Multiple quizzes may be given in class. If you miss more than four quizzes, you will receive a zero for your quiz grade for the semester. The quizzes are worth 25% of the final grade.

Surveys

In order to enhance research and teaching at the University of Texas you will be asked to participate in a series of surveys throughout the semester. Because the surveys will be used as tools for educational purposes, students will be required to participate, however if students object to participating in the survey, they may complete an alternative assignment. The alternative assignments will include activities, such as attending a campus lecture or writing a movie review. You must inform your teaching assistant that you choose to participate in the alternative assignment at least one week before the survey deadline and turn in the alternative assignment within a week after the survey deadline. For instance, if the deadline to complete a survey is October 8, you must inform your teaching assistant that you want to participate in the alternative assignment by October 1 and turn in that alternative assignment by October 15. Participation in the survey or alternative assignment will count as a quiz grade. Failure to participate in a survey or the alternative will count as a missed quiz.

Exams:

worth 75%There will be three exams in this course.  The exams will address all of the topics addressed in the course and center on how they relate to each other. The format of the exams will be essay and multiple choice. Each exam is worth 25% of your final grade.

Quizzes                                   25%

Exam One                               25%

Exam Two                               25%

Exam Three                             25%

Total                                        100%

GOV 370K • Black Church In Afr Amer Polit

38825 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 301
(also listed as AFR 374D, R S 346 )
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Course Description

The purpose of this course is to examine the political role of the Black church in the African American experience. Through the examination of the historical and contemporary scholarship on the Black church, this course will critically analyze how the church, its leaders, and members have used it to achieve the political goals of African Americans.

Prerequisite

The prerequisites for this course are upper division standing and six hours of lower division coursework in Government.

 Required Texts

1. McDaniel, Eric L. 2008. Politics in the Pews: The Political Mobilization of Black Churches. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

2. Schmidt, Diane E. 2010. Writing in Political Science: A Practical Guide. Fourth ed. Boston: Longman.

3. Sernett, Milton C., ed. 1999. African American Religious History: A Documentary Witness. Durham: Duke University Press.

4. Thurman, Howard. 1976. Jesus and the Disinherited. Boston: Beacon Press.

5. Course Pack available at Paradigm Copies 407 West 24th Street

 Recommended Books

1. Leedy, Paul D., and Jeanne Ellis Ormrod. 2004. Practical Research: Planning and Design. 8th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.   

Video References

1. Cross, June. 2003. God is a Negro. In This Far by Faith. USA: PBS Video.

2. Markowitz, Alice. 2003. Freedom Faith. In This Far by Faith. USA: PBS Video.

3.Bagwell, Orlando, and Susan Bellows. 1998. Africans in America : America's Journey Through Slavery. USA: PBS Video.

 Coursework  

Discussion Papers 60%

The discussion papers are 4-5 page typed papers that provide points for class conversation. The purpose of the discussion papers is to establish issues and concerns in response to the class readings. This is an opportunity for students to voice questions and concerns related to the readings. Students are required to discuss the readings and course materials of the week to address a question raised. You are required to provide proper citation and a bibliography in the preparation of the discussion papers. These papers are due at the beginning of class. There will be five discussion papers. The discussion papers are worth 60% of the final grade.

Research Paper 40%

A major aspect of the course will be the development of a research paper. The topic of the research paper will be the choosing of the student and must relate to religion and politics in regards to a racial and/or ethnic minority group in the United States. The paper is to be 12-15 pages in length and will be completed in three stages (prospectus, outline, and final draft). 

 

GOV 310L • American Government

38555 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am JES A121A
show description

see syllabus

GOV 370K • Black Church In Afr Amer Polit

38830 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.202
(also listed as AFR 374D, R S 346 )
show description

GOV 310L • American Government

38745 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 106
show description

See syllabus

GOV 370K • Black Church In Afr Amer Pol

39040 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 301
show description

The purpose of this course is to examine the political role of the Black church in the African American experience. Through the examination of the historical and contemporary scholarship on the Black church, this course will critically analyze how the church, its leaders, and members have used it to achieve the political goals of African Americans. 

GOV 310L • American Government

38360 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CAL 100
show description

Description: This course is designed to provide an introduction to the processes and
issues of United States and Texas government. The course will cover the
relevant institutions in the development of the governmental process as
well as discuss the role of the citizens in shaping our government.


Grading Policy:

TBD

Required Texts
TBD

GOV 370K • Black Church In Afr Amer Pol

38675 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JGB 2.102
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

Description: The purpose of this course is to examine the political role of the Black
church in the African American experience. Through the examination of
the historical and contemporary scholarship on the Black church, this
course will critically analyze how the church, its leaders, and members
have used it to achieve the political goals of African Americans. This
class will be reading and writing intensive.


Grading Policy:

TBD


Required Texts:


   1. Pinn, Anne H., and Anthony B. Pinn. 2002. /Fortress Introduction
      to Black Church History/. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press.
   2. Sernett, Milton C., ed. 1999. /African American Religious History:
      A Documentary Witness/. Durham: Duke University Press.
   3. Course Pack available at Paradigm Copies 407 West 24^th Street
   4. Other texts may be added

*Recommended Books*

   1. Faigley, Lester. 2006. /The Brief Penguin Handbook/. Second ed.
      New York: Pearson Longman.//
   2. Leedy, Paul D., and Jeanne Ellis Ormrod. 2004. /Practical
      Research: Planning and Design/. 8th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
      Prentice-Hall, Inc.

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