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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Juliet Hooker

Associate Professor Ph.D., Cornell University

Juliet Hooker

Contact

Biography

Professor Hooker writes on issues in contemporary political theory. In addition to her work on political solidarity, her research and teaching interests include theories of multiculturalism, critical race theory, comparative political theory (especially black political thought and Latin American political thought), and multiculturalism and indigenous and Afro-descendant politics in Latin America.

She has been the Associate Director of the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) since 2009. In 2008-2009 Prof Hooker was awarded the Lucia, John, and Melissa Gilbert Teaching Excellence Award in Women's and Gender Studies. 

Professor Hooker is the author of Race and the Politics of Solidarity (Oxford University Press, 2009). She has also published widely on multiculturalism in Latin America, race and nationalism in Nicaragua, and Afro-descendant politics in Latin America. In addition to book chapters in edited volumes, her articles have appeared in journals such as the Journal of Latin American Studies, the Latin American Research Review, and Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society.

GOV 382M • Freedom: Douglass/Dubois/Davis

39435 • Spring 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
(also listed as AFR 381 )
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 Prerequisites

NONE

 Course Description

Freedom is one of the central concepts in Western political thought; understandably, it has also been a key preoccupation for African-American thinkers.  This course will examine the concepts of freedom articulated in the work of Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, and Angela Davis, particularly in light of the relationship between freedom, emancipation, and slavery.  In addition, the conceptions of freedom put forward by Douglass, DuBois, and Davis will be contrasted with those in the canon of Western political thought and those put forward by Latin American political thinkers such as the Afro-Brazilian intellectual Adbias do Nascimento.

 

Grading Policy

Students will write two short (2 page, single spaced) critical response essays about the readings and one longer final paper (10-15 pages).  Final grades will be assessed based on the two critical response essays (17% each for a total of 34%), the final essay (34%), an in class presentation (16%), and class participation (16%).

 

Texts

Frederick Douglass, “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

_____ The Heroic Slave

_____ My Bondage and My Freedom

 

W. E. B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folks

_____ Dusk of Dawn: An Essay toward an Autobiography of a Concept of Race

_____ Dark Princess

 

Angela Davis, Women, Race, and Class (Vintage, 1983).

_____ Abolition Democracy: Beyond Empire, Prisons, and Torture/Interviews with Angela Y. Davis (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2005).

_____ Lectures on Liberation (Los Angeles: National United Committee to Free Angela Davis)

GOV 335M • The Us And 3rd-World Feminisms

39155 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.120
(also listed as WGS 340 )
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Course Description

This course explores the variety of feminisms developed by women of color and non-western women to critique the racism and ethnocentrism of white-dominated systems and practices, including feminism. Its overall concern is with the contemporary re-conceptualizations of feminism in light of "difference" as a result of the critical perspectives developed by women of color. We begin by examining the dominant approaches to feminist theory that emerged in the United States and Europe, such as liberal, Marxist, and radical feminism, as well as feminist epistemology and post-modern feminist analyses. We will then focus on the critiques of these traditions developed by women of color and their insistence on the need to address the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class.  Finally, we will examine recent debates regarding the politics of sexuality, the role of men in feminism, the relationship between race, gender and sexuality, and Arab feminism.

Grading Policy

Grades will be assessed based on class participation, 2 short essays, and a final paper. 

GOV 382M • Us Afr-Am/Lat Am Polit Thought

38918 • Fall 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as AFR 386, LAS 384L )
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Despite the current trend towards the study of comparative political theory, the work of Latin American political thinkers, which has been tremendously influential in their own region, remains marginal to the canon of Western political thought. Likewise, the work of U.S. African-American political thinkers is an important yet often overlooked strand of [U.S.] American political thought. This course is an an introduction to the history of these two traditions, and a comparative effort to understand the main thematics in each and the similarities and differences between them. It examines the answers U.S. African-American and Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory, as well as to other questions that have sometimes been viewed as marginal, such as: What is justice? What is freedom? What are the conditions of possibility for democratic politics? How should we theorize race? How should we conceive racial identity? What form should anti-racist politics take? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, including: Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, as well as to contemporary thinkers and debates about racial justice and black, latino, and indigenous politics in the U.S. and Latin America. The aim of the course is to identify the contours and substantive problematics of U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, particularly as they relate to questions of racial justice. 

GOV S365N • Afro-Caribbean Pol/Cul-Nic

85405 • Summer 2012
Meets
(also listed as AFR S374E, WGS S340 )
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STUDY ABROAD COURSE

Course Description

This course will examine the politics of race, culture, nation, and political mobilization among Afro-Caribbean communities on Central America’s Caribbean Coast. It will discuss the historical process by which these communities were formed in the region during the colonial era, different periods of labor migration, the emergence of anti-Black mestizo nationalism, and contemporary struggles for racial justice. Students will learn how Afro-Caribbean populations have drawn from their Caribbean roots to navigate and resist persistent patterns of racial, gender, and economic inequality and have challenged the racially defined limits of citizenship and national belonging within mestizo nation-states. The course will provide students with a foundation for understanding larger racial formation patterns in Central America and ground this analysis in historical and ethnographic studies of Afro-Caribbean populations in Nicaragua, Honduras, Costa Rica, Panama, and Belize.

GOV 382M • Afr-Am & Latin Am Pol Thought

38915 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as AFR 383, LAS 381 )
show description

Despite the current trend towards the study of comparative political theory, the work of Latin American political thinkers, which has been tremendously influential in their own region, remains marginal to the canon of Western political thought. Likewise, the work of U.S. African-American political thinkers is an important yet often overlooked strand of [U.S.] American political thought. This course is an an introduction to the history of these two traditions, and a comparative effort to understand the main thematics in each and the similarities and differences between them. It examines the answers U.S. African-American and Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory, as well as to other questions that have sometimes been viewed as marginal, such as: What is justice? What is freedom? What are the conditions of possibility for democratic politics? How should we theorize race? How should we conceive racial identity? What form should anti-racist politics take? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, including: Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, as well as to contemporary thinkers and debates about racial justice and black, latino, and indigenous politics in the U.S. and Latin America. The aim of the course is to identify the contours and substantive problematics of U.S. African-American and Latin American political thought, particularly as they relate to questions of racial justice.

GOV 335M • The Us And 3rd-World Feminisms

38685 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 3.402
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

This course explores the variety of feminisms developed by women of color and non-western women to critique the racism and ethnocentrism of white-dominated systems and practices, including feminism. Its overall concern is with the contemporary re-conceptualizations of feminism in light of "difference" as a result of the critical perspectives developed by women of color. We begin by examining the dominant approaches to feminist theory that emerged in the United States and Europe, such as liberal, Marxist, and radical feminism, as well as feminist epistemology and post-modern feminist analyses. We will then focus on the critiques of these traditions developed by women of color and their insistence on the need to address the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class.  Finally, we will examine recent debates regarding the politics of sexuality, the role of men in feminism, the relationship between race, gender and sexuality, and Arab feminism.

GOV 335M • The Us And 3rd-World Feminisms

38878 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 2.210
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

This course explores the variety of feminisms developed by women of color and non-western women to critique the racism and ethnocentrism of white-dominated systems and practices, including feminism. Its overall concern is with the contemporary re-conceptualizations of feminism in light of "difference" as a result of the critical perspectives developed by women of color. We begin by examining the dominant approaches to feminist theory that emerged in the United States and Europe, such as liberal, Marxist, and radical feminism, as well as feminist epistemology and post-modern feminist analyses. We will then focus on the critiques of these traditions developed by women of color and their insistence on the need to address the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class.  Finally, we will examine recent debates regarding the politics of sexuality, the role of men in feminism, the relationship between race, gender and sexuality, and Arab feminism.

 

Grades will be assessed based on class participation, 3 short essays, and a final paper.

GOV 382M • Latin American Polit Thought

38795 • Fall 2010
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as LAS 384L )
show description

Description: In spite of the tremendous influence that Latin American political thinkers have had in their own region, their work remains marginal to the canon of Western political theory. This course is an overview of the various traditions in the history of Latin American political thought. It examines the answers Latin American thinkers have given to some of the fundamental preoccupations of political theory from the perspective of the region’s social and political realities, such as: What is justice? What is the nature of the human? Under what conditions is popular sovereignty possible? What is the relationship between aesthetics and politics? What should be the relationship between religion and politics? How do we theorize culture and race? The course will introduce students to some of the most influential figures in Latin American political thought, including Bartolomé de las Casas, Simón Bolivar, Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Enrique Rodó, José Martí, José Vasconcelos, José Carlos Mariátegui, Ernesto ‘Ché’ Guevara, Gustavo Gutiérrez, as well as contemporary thinkers such as Walter Mignolo and Enrique Dussel. It will use this engagement with the history of political thought in Latin America to ask the following questions: To what extent can we say that there is a tradition of Latin American political thought? If so, what are its contours? What are the main problematics and principles of this tradition? To what extent does it reflect concerns specific to Latin America? To what extent does it speak to central questions in the canon of western political theory? How does it challenge the conceptual and methodological boundaries of that canon? And what, if any, is the difference between Latin American philosophy and Latin American political thought?


Grading Policy/Course Requirements:
Students will write three short (4 page) critical response essays about the readings.  
Students will also make one in-class presentation on the readings.
Final grades will be assessed based on three critical response essays (22% each for a total of 66%), in class presentation (18%), and class participation (16%).

Required Texts
1. Domingo F. Sarmiento, Facundo: Or, Civilization and Barbarism (Penguin Classics, 1998).
2. José Vasconcelos, The Cosmic Race (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997).
3. José Enrique Rodó, Ariel (University of Texas Press, 1998).
4. José Carlos Mariátegui, The Heroic and Creative Meaning of Socialism: Selected Essays of Jose Carlos Mariátegui (Humanity Books, 1996).
5. Gustavo Gutiérrez, A Theology of Liberation: History, Politics and Salvation (Orbis Books, 1998).
6. Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth (Grove Press, 2005).
Additional readings will be available through blackboard.

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