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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Wendy Hunter

Professor Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Wendy Hunter

Contact

Biography

Wendy Hunter studies Comparative Politics, with an emphasis on Latin American affairs. She has done in depth work on the military in Brazil and the Southern Cone, as well as research on social policy issues in Latin America, with special attention to the politics of education and health reform.

She is the author of "The Transformation of the Workers' Party in Brazil, 1989–2009" (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and "Eroding Military Influence in Brazil: Politicians against Soldiers" (University of North Carolina Press, 1997), and has published articles in Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Political Science Quarterly, International Studies Quarterly, the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and World Politics.

GOV 390L • Analytcl Iss In Lat Amer Polit

38170 • Spring 2015
Meets TH 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

 

Course Description

This course is a graduate-level introduction to Latin American politics.  It is designed to provide students with the theoretical and analytical tools to engage in cross-national study and research of political processes in Latin America.  It explores alternative theoretical approaches as well as substantive topics of major importance studied by scholars in the field.   Priority will be placed on critically examining the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to understanding political and economic change in the region.   The debates and theoretical currents that we will examine have been central not only in the study of Latin American politics but also in the development of the sub-discipline of Comparative Politics over the last thirty years.  

 

There are no prerequisites for the course.

 

Textbooks

 

Transitions from Authoritarian Rule:  Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies, by Guillermo O'Donnell and Philippe C. Schmitter.  Baltimore:  Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986. 

 

Brokers, Voters, and Clientelism, by Susan C. Stokes, Thad Dunning, Marcelo Nazareno, and Valeria Brusco, 2013. 

 

Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America, by Evelyne Huber and John D. Stephens.  Chicago and London:  The University of Chicago Press, 2012.  

 

Grading Policy

 

Grades will be based on two short (2-3 page) presentation papers (5 percent each); two 5-7 page essays (20 percent each); one final integrative essay OR research design (30 percent), and class participation (20 percent). 

GOV 391K • Teaching Practicum

39120 • Fall 2014
Meets T 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
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This is a very practical “how to” course on various elements of teaching.  It is intended to enhance your effectiveness and confidence as a teacher.  We will learn “by doing” and by having ongoing discussion and feedback.  Topics included effective lecturing, breaking up lectures with various other activities, leading engaging discussions, reaching different kinds and levels of students, dealing with some of the challenges specific to the nature of our discipline (e.g. controversial social and political topics), preventing conflicts with students, and dealing with problematic interactions when they occur.  

            I will keep the reading to a minimum as the goal of the course is not to bog you down with more work but to help you in very strategic, concrete, and immediate ways in your Assistant Instructor position.   By Friday of the preceding week, I will send out via e-mail anything that needs to be read over before the class session on Tuesday.  I will try to condense the main findings of the literature as much as possible and produce a list of “dos” and “don’ts.”  

            Each time we meet, students should be prepared to share one question, doubt, or problematic experience, as well as one example of a technique they tried and seemed to work well.   Students should feel free to raise in the group any concerns they have. 

            Highlights of the course include two videotaped lectures and the development of a teaching portfolio.  After the first videotaped lecture, done early in the semester, students will sit down with me for a joint review and critique.   The intention of the second videotaped lecture, done later in the course, is to receive further feedback once improvements have been attempted.

 

There are no prerequisites or texts to purchase.   Grading will be done on a Credit/No-Credit basis. 

GOV 337M • Pol/Eco/Socty Cont Brazil

39155 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 201
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

This course will examine the major economic, political, and sociological developments of Brazil in the 20th and 21st centuries.   It will concentrate on the broad themes of state-led industrialization and economic management; the alternation of authoritarian politics and democratic government; and the multiple problems brought on by high levels of socio-economic inequality.   In addition to the many challenges that Brazil faces, the course will also examine the many opportunities the country has. 

             The political topics to be covered include the institutions that allow elites to retain power and privilege.  Economic topics include recent moves toward increased globalization and the tapping of Amazonian resources.  Sociological subjects include the high rates of crime and related problems that have arisen from the pursuit of a development model that has led to extreme concentrations of wealth and record levels of income inequality.      

            The course assumes no prior knowledge or prerequisites.   

 

Two books are required and are available for purchase at the University bookstore.  All other readings are available on Blackboard under Course Documents.

 

Required Items for Purchase

-       Skidmore, Thomas E. 2009. Brazil: Five Centuries of Change. New York: Oxford        University Press, 2009.

-       Bailey, Stanley. 2009. Legacies of Race: Identities, Attitudes, and Politics in Brazil.      Stanford: Stanford University Press.

 

Requirements and Grading:

 

Reading is due by the Tuesday session of each week.  It is imperative that students do the readings, reflect upon them, and come to class prepared to discuss them.  Class participation, which goes beyond simple attendance, will be a significant factor in the final grade.  There will be one quiz, two in-class examinations, an essay about a film, and a final take-home essay that reflects upon the course as a whole. Please bring a blue book to both exams. The instructions for the film essay are on Blackboard.  I will hand out questions and instructions for the final essay well in advance of its due date.

 

Assignment:                                                    Grade Distribution                 Due Date

Class participation                                          10 percent                    

Quizzes (2)                                                     10 percent                                

First in-class examination                               20 percent                              

Second in-class examination                            20 percent                                

Essay on film                                                  10 percent                              

Final take home essay                                     30 percent                                

 

Grading: This course will use plus/minus grades.

 

Your final grade will be calculated as follows:  we will sum all the points you received in the class and convert them into letter grades based on the following scale:

 

93-100 = A

90-92 = A-

87-89 = B+

83-86 = B

80-82 = B-

77-79 = C+

73-76 = C

70-72 = C-

67-69 = D+

63-66 = D

60-62 = D-

Below 60 = F

 

Without exception, we will round up scores of 0.5 and higher and round down scores of less than 0.5. Students who wish to contest a grade must do so in writing within two weeks of the day on which the assignment was handed back in class.  Students must go first to one of the TAs and then to the professor only if the meeting, scheduled after receipt of the written appeal, was deemed unsatisfactory. 

 

Attendance will be accounted for as part of your class participation grade.

 

The final essay must be submitted at the beginning of the last class session.  There is a penalty of a full letter grade per day for late essays (both the film essay and the final essay).  We will not accept papers that are submitted via e-mail.

 

Make-up policy:  Students are expected to take the quiz and two in-class exams on the scheduled dates, and to hand the film essay and final essay in on time.  Make ups and extensions will be reserved for the most exceptional of circumstances, such as a serious medical illness (accompanied by a physician’s letter) or death of a close family member.   You must have documentation in order for a make up to be considered. Weddings and graduation ceremonies will not be considered an acceptable basis for any missed examinations or an extension on the final.

GOV 398T • Supv Teaching In Government

39550 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 930am-1230pm BAT 5.102
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Course Description

This course is intended to enhance your confidence and effectiveness as a teacher.  It will focus on designing a syllabus, lecturing effectively, leading engaging discussions, motivating students, constructing assignments to assess learning, heading off problems with students, and learning from student feedback.  Additional topics to be covered include employing diverse teaching techniques for larger vs. smaller classes, reaching different kinds and levels of students, and dealing with some of the challenges specific to the nature of our discipline, such as the discussion of controversial social and political topics. 

 

No prerequisites are necessary.

 

One text necessary for purchase:  Ken Bain.  2004.  What the Best College Teachers Do.     Harvard University Press.  (ISBN 0-674-01325-5)

 

All other readings will be made available electronically.  

 

How the grade will be calculated.  

 

Seminar participation (25 percent)

Syllabus design of two courses (50 percent)

One lecture (25 percent)

GOV 337M • Polit/Eco/Socty Contemp Brazil

38835 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

Course Description

This course will examine the major economic, political, and sociological developments of Brazil in the 20th and 21st centuries.   It will concentrate on the broad themes of state-led industrialization and economic management; the alternation of authoritarian politics and democratic government; and the multiple problems brought on by high levels of socio-economic inequality.   In addition to the many challenges that Brazil faces, the course will also examine the many opportunities the country has. 

The political topics to be covered include the institutions that allow elites to retain power and privilege.  Economic topics include recent moves toward increased globalization and the tapping of Amazonian resources.  Sociological subjects include the high rates of crime and related problems that have arisen from the pursuit of a development model that has led to extreme concentrations of wealth and record levels of income inequality.      

The course assumes no prior knowledge or prerequisites.   

Two books are required and are available for purchase at the University bookstore.  All other readings are available on Blackboard under Course Documents.

 

 

Grading Policy

Reading is due by the Tuesday session of each week.  It is imperative that students do the readings, reflect upon them, and come to class prepared to discuss them.  Class participation, which goes beyond simple attendance, will be a significant factor in the final grade.  There will be one quiz, two in-class examinations, an essay about a film, and a final take-home essay that reflects upon the course as a whole. Please bring a blue book to both exams. The instructions for the film essay are on Blackboard and I will hand out questions and instructions for the final essay well in advance of its due date.

Assignment:                                                    Grade Distribution                

Class participation                                          10 percent                    

Quiz                                                             10 percent                                

First in-class examination                               20 percent                              

Second in-class examination                           20 percent                                

Essay on film                                                 10 percent                              

Final take home essay                                    30 percent                                

 

This course will use plus/minus grades. Attendance will be accounted for as part of your class participation grade.

The final essay must be submitted at the beginning of the last class session.  There is a penalty of a full letter grade per day for late essays (both the film essay and the final essay).  I will not accept papers that are submitted via e-mail.

 

Texts

-       Skidmore, Thomas E. 2009. Brazil: Five Centuries of Change. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

-       Bailey, Stanley. 2009. Legacies of Race: Identities, Attitudes, and Politics in Brazil. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

GOV 390L • Analytcl Iss In Lat Amer Polit

39120 • Spring 2013
Meets T 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
(also listed as LAS 384L )
show description

Course Description

This course is a graduate-level introduction to Latin American politics.  It is designed to provide students with the theoretical and analytical tools to engage in cross-national study and research of political processes in Latin America.  It explores alternative theoretical approaches as well as substantive topics of major importance studied by scholars in the field.   Priority will be placed on critically examining the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to understanding political and economic change in the region.   The debates and theoretical currents that we will examine have been central not only in the study of Latin American politics but also in the development of the sub-discipline of Comparative Politics over the last thirty years.  

 

Course Requirements  

1. Seminar participation:  The success of the seminar will depend first and foremost upon the active engagement of students.  Barring extraordinary circumstances, students should always come prepared to discuss and debate the material.  You must contact me ahead of time if you plan to miss a session.  

2. Two position briefs. Twice during the semester students will write a brief (3-4 double-spaced pages in length) on the readings in response to questions that will be handed out. The same students who write for the week will lead off the class discussion.  Students will sign up to select these days.  

3. Two short essays.  Students will be required to write two short essays (6–8 double-spaced pages) that critically analyze the readings around given questions.  These essays must put forth and develop a thesis, not merely summarize/synthesize the readings. 

4. Final Assignment:  Students will be required to write a final integrative essay (10–12 double-spaced pages) in response to given questions OR come up with a research design for a proposed study. Instructions will follow on the latter. Doctoral students who plan on doing theses on Latin America are urged to consider the research design option.

Deadlines and Grade Determination

Seminar participation:  20 percent

Position papers:  5 percent each (students will sign up for two specific dates)

Two short essays:  20 percent each

Final Essay: 30 percent 

You should e-mail the class your position papers by 8:00 am on the day you will present.

Please submit the essays to my government department box by 4:00 of the day they are due.   I will not accept papers via e-mail.   Late papers will be penalized by 1/3 of a letter grade per day. 

 

Texts

Transitions from Authoritarian Rule. Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies, by Guillermo O'Donnell and Philippe C. Schmitter.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986. 

Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America, by Evelyne Huber and John D. Stephens.  Chicago and London:  The University of Chicago Press. 

Leftist Governments in Latin America: Successes and Shortcomings, edited by Kurt Weyland, Raúl L. Madrid, and Wendy Hunter.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

All other readings have been posted on Blackboard. 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38620 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 1.402
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Prerequisites

None

 

Course Description:

 In recent decades, social movements have mobilized people concerned about issues ranging from the rights of women and ethnic minorities to the environment, human rights, and world peace.  These new social movements are frequently distinguished by the socio-economic heterogeneity of their members, the informal and fluid nature of their organization, the uneasy relationship they have to established political institutions, and the unconventional forms of protest they employ.

This course will examine and analyze the origins, modes of action, and impact of movements centered on three issues:  women, racial minorities, and the environment.  Comparisons will be made between the civil rights movement in the United States and the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, feminism in the United States and in Chile, and the Greens in West Germany and Brazilian efforts to diminish the destruction of the Amazon rain forest. 

The goal of this comparative enterprise will be to examine how different socio-economic and political contexts shape social movements based on somewhat common issues.  For example, in many developing societies, where great numbers of people are poor, uneducated, and often intimidated by authoritarian governments, social movements face particularly stiff obstacles to organization.  International attention and support have often been necessary to protect these movements.  By contrast, in the West, basic human rights are more likely to be guaranteed and an articulate middle class with a sense of political efficacy is more likely to assure the success of a social movement.   In this vein, the course will analyze how social movements emerge and function within existing structures of politics, and how they try to create new structures of interest representation to influence policy-making.

 

Grading Policy: There will be two in class examinations during the course of the semester and one final take-home essay assignment.

 

Texts 

Sidney Tarrow.  2011.  Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics.  New York:  Cambridge University Press. 

Clayborne Carson.  1995.   In Struggle:  SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s.Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 

Boehmer, Elleke.  2008.  Nelson Mandela:  A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Ruth Rosen.  2000.  The World Split Open:  How the Women’s Movement Changed America. New York:  Viking/Penguin. 

Lisa Baldez.  2002.  Why Women Protest:  Women’s Movements in Chile.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Other readings will be made available through Blackboard.   

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38635 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 1.316
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Course Description:

 In recent decades, social movements have mobilized people concerned about issues ranging from the rights of women and ethnic minorities to the environment, human rights, and world peace.  These new social movements are frequently distinguished by the socio-economic heterogeneity of their members, the informal and fluid nature of their organization, the uneasy relationship they have to established political institutions, and the unconventional forms of protest they employ.

This course will examine and analyze the origins, modes of action, and impact of movements centered on three issues:  women, racial minorities, and the environment.  Comparisons will be made between the civil rights movement in the United States and the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, feminism in the United States and in Chile, and the Greens in West Germany and Brazilian efforts to diminish the destruction of the Amazon rain forest. 

The goal of this comparative enterprise will be to examine how different socio-economic and political contexts shape social movements based on somewhat common issues.  For example, in many developing societies, where great numbers of people are poor, uneducated, and often intimidated by authoritarian governments, social movements face particularly stiff obstacles to organization.  International attention and support have often been necessary to protect these movements.  By contrast, in the West, basic human rights are more likely to be guaranteed and an articulate middle class with a sense of political efficacy is more likely to assure the success of a social movement.   In this vein, the course will analyze how social movements emerge and function within existing structures of politics, and how they try to create new structures of interest representation to influence policy-making.

 

Grading Policy: There will be two in class examinations during the course of the semester and one final take-home essay assignment.

 

Texts 

Sidney Tarrow.  2011.  Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics.  New York:  Cambridge University Press. 

Clayborne Carson.  1995.   In Struggle:  SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s.Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 

Boehmer, Elleke.  2008.  Nelson Mandela:  A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Ruth Rosen.  2000.  The World Split Open:  How the Women’s Movement Changed America. New York:  Viking/Penguin. 

Lisa Baldez.  2002.  Why Women Protest:  Women’s Movements in Chile.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Other readings will be made available through Blackboard.   

GOV 337M • Polit/Eco/Socty Contemp Brazil

38680 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

Description: 

This course will examine the major economic, political, and sociological developments of Brazil in the 20th and 21st centuries.   It will concentrate on the broad themes of state-led industrialization and economic management; the alternation of authoritarian politics and democratic government; and the multiple challenges brought on by high levels of social inequality in the country.   More specifically, economic topics include recent moves toward increased globalization and the tapping of Amazonian resources.  Political topics to be covered include the institutions that have allowed elites to retain power and privilege.  Sociological subjects include the high rates of crime and related challenges that have arisen from the pursuit of a development model that has led to extreme concentrations of wealth and record levels of income inequality.  The course also examines recent policies designed to alleviate poverty and improve the country’s profile of inequality. 

Prerequisites:

None

Requirements and Grading:

Reading is due by the Tuesday session of each week.  It is imperative that students do the readings, reflect upon them, and come to class prepared to discuss them.  Class participation will be a significant factor in the final grade.  Attendance will be accounted for as part of the class participation grade.  There will be one quiz, two in-class examinations, and a final take-home essay that reflects upon the course as a whole. I will hand out questions for the final essay well in advance of the due date.   

Assignment:                     Grade Distribution     

 Class participation                    10 percent    

 Quiz                                        10 percent

First in-class examination           25 percent  

Second in-class examination      25 percent   

Final take home essay               30 percent   

This course will use plus/minus grades.

Texts for purchase:   

- Bailey, Stanley. 2009. Legacies of Race: Identities, Attitudes, and Politics in Brazil. Stanford : Stanford University Press.

- Skidmore, Thomas E. 2009. Brazil: Five Centuries of Change. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

- Course Packet

GOV 390L • Analytcl Iss In Lat Amer Polit

38980 • Spring 2012
Meets T 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as LAS 384L )
show description

Course Description

This course is a graduate-level introduction to Latin American politics.  It is designed to provide students with the theoretical and analytical tools to engage in cross-national study and research of political processes in Latin America.  It explores alternative theoretical approaches as well as substantive topics of major importance studied by scholars in the field.   Priority will be placed on critically examining the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to understanding political and economic change in the region.   The debates and theoretical currents that we will examine have been central not only in the study of Latin American politics but also in the development of the sub-discipline of Comparative Politics over the last thirty years.   

Book to Purchase

Transitions from Authoritarian Rule.  Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies, by Guillermo O'Donnell and Philippe C. Schmitter.  Baltimore:  Johns Hopkins University Press,1986.  

Leftist Governments in Latin America:  Successes and Shortcomings, edited by Kurt Weyland, Raúl L. Madrid, and Wendy Hunter.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Course Requirements   

1. Seminar participation:  The success of the seminar will depend first and foremost upon the active engagement of students.  Barring extraordinary circumstances, students should always come prepared to discuss and debate the material.  You must contact me ahead of time if you plan to miss a session.  

2. Two position papers. Twice during the semester students will write a very short paper (2-3 pages in length) on the readings in response to questions that will be handed out. The same students that write for the week will lead off the class discussion.  Students will sign up to select these days. 

 3. Two short essays.  Students will be required to write two short essays (6–8 pages) that critically analyze the readings around given questions.  These essays must put forth and develop a thesis, not merely summarize/synthesize the readings.  

4. Final essay.  Students will be required to write a final integrative essay (10–12 pages) in response to given questions.      

No prerequisites

GOV 365N • Iss In Third-World Development

38800 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 2.128
show description

See syllabus

GOV 365N • Iss In Third-World Development

38805 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 203
show description

coming soon

GOV 337M • Polit/Eco/Socty Contemp Brazil

38910 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

This course will examine the major economic, political, and sociological developments of 

Brazil in the 20th and 21st centuries.   It will concentrate on the broad themes of state-led 

industrialization and economic management; the alternation of authoritarian politics and 

democratic government; and the multiple problems brought on by high levels of socio- 

economic inequality.   In addition to the many challenges that Brazil faces, the course 

will also examine the many opportunities the country has.   

  The political topics to be covered include the institutions that allow elites to 

retain power and privilege.  Economic topics include recent moves toward increased 

globalization and the tapping of Amazonian resources.  Sociological subjects include the 

high rates of crime and related problems that have arisen from the pursuit of a 

development model that has led to extreme concentrations of wealth and record levels of 

income inequality.       

GOV 390L • Analytcl Iss In Lat Amer Polit

39205 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as LAS 384L )
show description

coming soon

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38450 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Course Description: In recent decades, social movements have mobilized people concerned about issues ranging from the rights of women and ethnic minorities to the environment, human rights, and world peace.  These new social movements are frequently distinguished by the socio-economic heterogeneity of their members, the informal and fluid nature of their organization, the uneasy relationship they have to established political institutions, and the unconventional forms of protest they employ.
This course will examine and analyze the origins, modes of action, and impact of movements centered on three issues:  women, racial minorities, and the environment.  Comparisons will be made between the civil rights movement in the United States and the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, feminism in the United States and Chile, and the Greens in West Germany and Brazilian efforts to diminish the destruction of the Amazon rain forest.  
The goal of this comparative enterprise will be to examine how different socio-economic and political contexts shape social movements based on somewhat common issues.  For example, in many developing societies, where great numbers of people are poor, uneducated, and often intimidated by authoritarian governments, social movements face particularly stiff obstacles to organization.  International attention and support have often been necessary to protect these movements.  By contrast, in the West, basic human rights are more likely to be guaranteed and an articulate middle class with a sense of political efficacy is more likely to assure the success of a social movement.   In this vein, the course will analyze how social movements emerge and function within existing structures of politics, and how they try to create new structures of interest representation to influence policy-making.

Grading Policy: There will be an in-class midterm, an in-class final, and one essay.

 

Textbooks:

Sidney Tarrow.  1998.  Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics.  
(second edition).  New York:  Cambridge University Press.  

Clayborne Carson.  2001.   In Struggle:  SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s.
(fourth printing).  Cambridge:  Harvard University Press.  

Ruth Rosen.  2000.  The World Split Open:  How the Women’s Movement Changed
America.  New York:  Viking/Penguin.  

Lisa Baldez.  2002.  Why Women Protest:  Women’s Movements in Chile.  New York:   
Cambridge University Press.

Chico Mendes.  1989.  Fight for the Forest.  New York:  Monthly Review Press.



GOV 365N • Iss In Third-World Development

38650 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 2.128
show description

Course Description: Why are developing countries still so impoverished?  Why are income disparities in the world still so pronounced?  Why are some countries progressing and others not or much less so?   Focusing on these basic questions, this course provides an introduction to issues in Third World development and politics.  After analyzing some of the objective indicators of underdevelopment as well as gaining a greater appreciation of the subjective experiences of poverty and marginality, we will examine a number of economic, sociological and political frameworks for understanding some of the major constraints to and opportunities for advancement in developing societies.       


Grading Policy:  The grade will rest on class participation, an initial assessment of the human development report, two in-class examinations and a final take home essay.    


Textbooks:

The following books are required and will be available for purchase at the University bookstore.

Howard Handleman.  2009.  The Challenge of Third World Development. Longman.  
    Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.

James C. Scott.  1976.  The Moral Economy of the Peasant:  Rebellion and Subsistence
in Southeast Asia. New Haven: Yale University Press.   

Paul Collier.  2007.  The Bottom Billion:  Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and
What Can be Done about It.  Oxford:  Oxford University Press.  

Ismael Beah.  2008.  A Long Way Gone:  Memoirs of Boy Soldier. New York:  Farrar,
    Straus and Giroux.   

  

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39075 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAI 3.02
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov

38185 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

Books Published

The Transformation of the Workers' Party in Brazil, 1989–2009

2010, Cambridge University Press.

Leftist Governments in Latin America: Successes and Shortcomings

2010, Cambridge University Press. Edited by Kurt Weyland, Raúl L. Madrid and Wendy Hunter..

Eroding Military Influence in Brazil: Politicians against Soldiers

1997, The University of North Carolina Press.

State and Soldier in Latin America: Redefining the Military’s Role in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile

1996, United States Institute of Peace Press.

Journal Articles

"Whither Clientelism? Good Governance and Brazil's Bolsa Familia Program"

Natasha Borges Sugiyama and Wendy Hunter. Comparative Politics, October 2013.

“Democracy and Social Policy in Brazil: Advancing Basic Needs, Preserving Privileged Interests.”

Wendy Hunter and Natasha Borges Sugiyama. Latin American Politics and Society 51:2 (Summer 2009): 29–58.

"The Normalization of an Anomaly: The Workers' Party in Brazil."

World Politics 59:3 (April 2007): 440–475.

"Rewarding Lula: Executive Power, Social Policy, and the Brazilian Elections of 2006."

Wendy Hunter and Timothy J. Power/ Latin American Politics and Society 49:1 (Spring 2007): 1–30.

"The Effects of Capital Mobility, Trade Openness, and Democracy on Social Spending in Latin America, 1980-1999."

George Avelino, David S. Brown and Wendy Hunter. American Journal of Political Science 49:3 (July 2005): 625–641.

“Democracy and Human Capital Formation: Education Spending in Latin America, 1980–1997.”

David S. Brown and Wendy Hunter. Comparative Political Studies 37:7 (September 2004): 842–864.

“World Bank Directives, Domestic Interests, and the Politics of Human Capital Investment in Latin America.”

Wendy Hunter and David S. Brown. Comparative Political Studies 33:1 (February 2000): 113–143.

“Democracy and Social Spending in Latin America, 1980–1992.”

David S. Brown and Wendy Hunter. American Political Science Review 93:4 (December 1999): 779–790.

“Negotiating Civil-Military Relations in Post-Authoritarian Argentina and Chile.”

International Studies Quarterly 42:2 (June 1998): 295–318.

“Continuity or Change? Civil–Military Relations in Democratic Argentina, Chile, and Peru.”

Political Science Quarterly 112:3 (Fall 1997): 1–23.

“Market Structures, Political Institutions, and Democratization: The Latin American and East European Experiences.”

with David Bartlett. Review of International Political Economy 4:1 (Winter 1997): 87–126.

“Politicians against Soldiers: Contesting the Military in Post–Authoritarian Brazil.”

Comparative Politics 27:4 (July 1995): 425–443.

“Contradictions of Civilian Control: Argentina, Brazil and Chile in the 1990s.”

Third World Quarterly 15:4 (1994): 635–655.

“The Brazilian Military after the Cold War: In Search of a Mission.”

Studies in Comparative International Development 28:4 (Winter 1994): 31–49.

Other Journal Articles

"Lula’s Brazil at Mid–Term.”

Wendy Hunter and Timothy J. Power. Journal of Democracy 16:3 (July 2005): 127–139.

“Brazil’s New Direction.”

Journal of Democracy 14:2 (April 2003): 151–162.

Invited Contributions

"The Partido dos Trabalhadores: Is the PT Still a Party of the Left?"

In Peter Kingstone and Timothy Power eds., Democratic Brazil Revisited. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2008: 15-32.

"Rewarding Lula"

Wendy Hunter and Timothy J. Power. A Portuguese translation of the 2007 journal article, "Rewarding Lula" was published in Carlos Ranulfo Felix de Melo and Manuel Alcántara Sáez, eds., A democracia brasileira: balanço e perspectivas para o século XXI (Belo Horizonte: Editora UFMG, 2007). A Spanish translation of the article appears in Carlos Ranulfo Felix de Melo and Manuel Alcántara Sáez, eds., La democracia brasileña: balance y perspectivas para el siglo XXI (Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 2008).

"Corrupção no Partido dos Trabalhadores: O Dilema do 'Sistema.'"

In Jairo Nicolau and Timothy J. Power eds., Instituições representativas no Brasil: Balanço e reforma. Belo Horizonte: Editora UFMG, 2007.

"Internacionalização Econômica, Democratização e Gastos Sociais na América Latina, 1980–1999."

George Avelino, David S. Brown and Wendy Hunter. In Gilberto Hochman, Marta Arretche, and Eduardo Marques eds., Políticas Públicas no Brasil. Rio de Janeiro: Editora Fio Cruz, 2007.

“Growth and Transformation of the Workers’ Party in Brazil, 1989–2002.”

Kellogg Institute Working Paper, #326, August 2006: 1-37.

"Internacionalização, Democracia e Gasto Social: Comparações de uma Perspectiva Latino–Americana."

George Avelino, David S. Brown and Wendy Hunter. In Paulo Arvate and Ciro Biderman eds., Economia do Setor Público no Brasil. Campus Elsevier, 2004.

“Education Policy Reform in Latin America: New Opportunities and Old Constraints.”

In Ana Margheritis, eds., Latin American Democracies in the New Global Economy. Miami: North–South Center Press at the University of Miami, 2003: 173-195.

“Globalization, Democracy, and Social Spending in Latin America.”

George Avelino, David S. Brown and Wendy Hunter. In John O’Loughlin eds., Globalization and its Outcomes. New York: Guilford Publications, 2004: 209-228.

“Reason, Culture, or Structure?: Assessing Civil–Military Dynamics in Brazil.”

In David Pion–Berlin ed. Civil–Military Relations in Latin America: New Perspectives. Chapel Hill and London: The University of North Carolina Press, 2001: 36-58.

“The Role of International Financial Institutions in Promoting Economic Reforms and International Cooperation in the Americas.”

In Jorge I. Domínguez ed. The Future of Inter–American Relations. New York and London: Routledge Press, 2000: 113-130.

“Assessing Civil-Military Relations in Post-Authoritarian Brazil.”

In Peter Kingstone and Timothy Power eds. Democratic Brazil: Actors, Institutions, and Processes. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2000: 101-125.

“The Dirty War and its Aftermath: Recent Contributions on the Military and Politics in Argentina.”

Latin American Research Review 34:2 (Spring 1999): 198-213.

“Civil–Military Relations in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile: Present Trends, Future Prospects.”

In Felipe Agüero and Jeff Stark eds. Fault Lines of Democratic Governance in the Americas. The North–South Center at the University of Miami in conjunction with Lynne Rienner Press, 1998.

Book Reviews

Review of Robert R. Kaufman and Joan M. Nelson, eds. Crucial Needs, Weak Incentives: Social Sector Reform, Democratization, and Globalization in Latin America. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.

In The Latin Americanist 48:2 (Spring 2005): 124-126.

Review of Barry Ames. The Deadlock of Democracy in Brazil. University of Michigan Press, 2001.

In Perspectives on Politics: The American Political Science Association 1:1 (March 2003).   

Review of J. Samuel Fitch. The Armed Forces and Democracy in Latin America. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.

In Comparative Political Studies (Spring 2000).

Review of Ken Conca. Manufacturing Insecurity: The Rise and Fall of Brazil’s Military–Industrial Complex. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1996.

In the American Political Science Review 92:3 (September 1998).

Review of Lars Schoultz, William C. Smith, and Augusto Varas, eds. Security, Democracy, and Development in U.S.–Latin American Relations. Miami: University of Miami, North–South Center, 1994.

In the American Political Science Review 89:4 (September 1995).

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