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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

J. Budziszewski

Professor Ph.D., Yale University

J. Budziszewski

Contact

Biography

Professor Budziszewski specializes in political philosophy, ethical philosophy, and the interaction of religion with philosophy. Among his research interests are classical natural law, virtue ethics, moral self deception, family and sexuality, and the problem of toleration.

His books include The Resurrection of Nature: Political Theory and the Human Character (Cornell, 1986), The Nearest Coast of Darkness: A Vindication of the Politics of Virtues (Cornell, 1988), True Tolerance: Liberalism and the Necessity of Judgment (Transaction, 1992), Written on the Heart: The Case for Natural Law (InterVarsity, 1997), The Revenge of Conscience: Politics and the Fall of Man (Spence, 1999), Evangelicals in the Public Square (Baker Academic, 2006), Natural Law for Lawyers (Blackstone Fellowship, 2006), The Line Through the Heart: Natural Law as Fact, Theory, and Sign of Contradiction (Intercollegiate Studies Institute Press, 2009), What We Can't Not Know: A Guide (2d ed. Ignatius, 2011), and On the Meaning of Sex(Intercollegiate Studies Institute Press, 2012). His newest book is Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Treatise on Law (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

Interests

See biography

GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory

37895 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CLA 0.106
show description

 

 

GOV 335M • Religion In Amer Pol Thought

37910 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as R S 346 )
show description

 

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38745 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.306
show description

 

Substantial writing component.  Fulfills second half of legislative requirement for 6 hours of American Government.  Includes strongly encouraged, but voluntary, Supplemental Instruction discussion sections, which are statistically associated with higher grades for those students who participate.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

Americans are often said to be obsessed with their Constitution.  So be it; but then it behooves us to know something about it.  The approach taken in this course is to return to the early debates surrounding its writing and ratification.  We make no use at all of textbooks; rather we study the political thinking of the early Americans in their own words.

 

Another old saw is that history is written by the winners.  However, this is not be a course in winner-worship:  Equal attention and respect are given, on the one hand, to those who wrote the Constitution and argued for its ratification, and on the other, to those who argued against it or demanded sweeping changes in its content.  There are several good reasons for such evenhandedness.  One is that, for all we know, the losers might have been right.  Another is that they might have had some influence on the winners.  Still a third is that we can't fully understand the arguments by which the winners won unless we understand what they were arguing against.

 

Having spoken of history, I should now admit that this is not a "history course" in the ordinary sense.  Rather it is a course in early American political thought -- in political theory and philosophy.  Another thing that you should understand is that this course puts heavy emphasis on the development of skills in interpretive reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing.  For instance, it doesn't matter that you can read what a writer has written and figure out what he believes.  What matters is whether you can learn to figure out why he believes it, and how it is logically related to other things he believes.  In other words, when you read you are expected to look for arguments, not just propositions.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

Unit 1: Required analytical outline.

 

Unit 2:  Required take-home essay.  Extra credit for analytical outline.

 

Unit 3:  Required take-home essay.  Extra credit for analytical outline.

 

Thirteen short quizzes.

 

Attendance in Supplemental Instruction discussion sections is STRONGLY recommended but not required, and is statistically correlated with better performance and therefore higher grades.

Final grades are calculated in four steps.  First, each student's TWO lowest quiz grades are dropped, and remaining quiz grades averaged.  Second, this average is "curved."  Third, the uncurved exam grades and the curved quiz average are weighted, as follows:

 

            Unit 1 analytical outlines                                                             25%

            Unit 2 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)       25%

            Unit 3 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)       25%

            Curved quiz average                                                                   25%

 

Class participation and attendance modify grades.  Scholastic dishonesty results in a failing grade for the course.

 

See the “Other things my students may need” section at the bottom of the Teaching page at my personal website:  http://www.UndergroundThomist.org/teaching , especiall the course policies in the FAQ, which I expect you to know.

 

TEXTS

 

The following required books have been ordered.  Each book must be purchased.  Always bring with you to class the books we are using at the moment.

 

1. Ralph Ketcham, ed., The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates, excerpts.

 

2. Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, The Federalist, excerpts.

 

3. Herbert J. Storing, ed., with Murray Dry, The Anti-Federalist, excerpts.

GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory

39120 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CLA 1.104
(also listed as PHL 342 )
show description

Prerequisites, Flags, and Field

If the course is taken as Gov 335M, enrollment requires six semester hours of lower-division government; it can also be taken as Phl 342, but seats in that section are limited.  It carries a writing flag and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  Within the Government Department, its field is Political Theory.

 

Description

“Natural law” refers to moral law – in particular, the fundamental moral principles that are built into the design of human nature and lie at the roots of conscience.  Natural law thinking is the spine of the Western tradition of jurisprudence.  Historically, it has provided the basis for talking about all of the 'hot button' issues in past and present culture wars; if you wanted to talk about war, slavery, political liberty, or relations between men and women, you talked about natural law.  The distinctive mark of natural law thinking is that it begins from what the mind can know about these things by reasoning alone, rather than by the authority of revelation.  This in no ways denies revelation, for although the earliest natural law thinkers were pagans, the most influential natural law thinkers have been Christians who held that reason and revelation work together.

The founders of the American republic believed in the natural law -- in universal and "self-evident" principles of justice and morality which the Declaration of Independence called "the laws of Nature and of Nature's God."   For generations afterward, most Americans took the reality of natural law for granted.  The Declaration of Independence had appealed to it to justify independence; Abraham Lincoln appealed to it to criticize slavery; Martin Luther King appealed to it to criticize racial discrimination.  You would hardly guess any of this from the present day, because belief in natural law has come to be viewed as "politically incorrect."  Nevertheless, the tradition of natural law is experiencing a modest renaissance.

Is there really a natural law?  What difference does it make to society and politics if there is?  Is it really "natural"?  Is it really "law"?  To consider these questions, we will read a variety of influential works on natural law from the middle ages to the present.  Probably, most of your liberal arts education has implicitly rejected the whole idea, but in this course, for a change, you have an opportunity to hear the other side.

 

Requirements

For Unit 1, a required analytical outline (20%).  For Units 2, 3, and 4, take-home essays (20% apiece).  Short-answer quizzes (20%).  Extra credit for analytical outlines for Units 2, 3, and 4 (up to 5 points per unit, added to exam grades).

 

TEXTS

You must bring copies of the readings to class, even if only photocopies or printouts.

 

Recommended:

1.  J. Budziszewski, What We Can't Not Know: A Guide (purchase or read on PCL reserve)

 

Required:

2.  C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man (purchase or read online)

3.  Thomas Aquinas, Treatise on Law (purchase or read online)

4.  Robert P. George, The Clash of Orthodoxies

5.  Russell Hittinger, The First Grace

6.  Short readings packet.

7.  Online readings listed in the readings packet

 

UNITS

Unit 1:  Introduction to the Concept

Unit 2:  The Classical Synthesis

Unit 3:  The American Reception of Natural Law Tradition

Unit 4:  Contemporary Work in Natural Law Theory

GOV 335M • Religion In Amer Pol Thought

39135 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as R S 346 )
show description

Prerequisites, Flags, and Field

If the course is taken as Gov 335M, enrollment requires six semester hours of lower-division government; it may also be taken as RS 346, but seats in that section are limited.  It carries a writing flag and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.  Within the Government Department, its field is Political Theory.

 

Description

Religion in politics is an emotional issue for believers and nonbelievers alike, and there is a great temptation to simply clobber one's neighbor with a slogan like "Separation of church and state" or "In God we trust."  The purpose of this course is to help you get beyond the slogans.

We will be studying a large number of sources, mostly primary, mostly short, from the colonial period right up to the present.  Typically, we will read the religious arguments on each side of each of the issues we discuss.  Some sources discuss issues like whether faith should be enforced or whether revolution is consistent with the law of God.  Others discuss issues like the meaning of the Establishment and Free Exercise clauses in the Constitution.  Still others discuss particular historical controversies, such as whose side God was on in the Civil War, what God thinks of war in general, or what God requires by way of racial justice.  A final set of readings concerns the quarrel between secularism and its critics.

 

Requirements

For Unit 1, the requirement is a set of analytical outlines (20%); for Units 2, 3, and 4, the requirement is a 4-page take-home essay (20% each).  Fourteen short-answer-format quizzes are administered on scheduled dates (20%).  There is no cumulative final examination.  Attendance and participation do affect grades.

Unit 1 analytical outlines (uncurved)                20%

Unit 2 essay plus extra credit (uncurved)          20%

Unit 3 essay plus extra credit (uncurved)          20%

Unit 4 essay plus extra credit (uncurved)          20%

Curved quiz average                                         20%

 

Required texts

The required readings will be in a packet available for purchase at the UT Copy Center, McCombs 3.136, phone: 471-8281.  You must have a personal copy of the packet, not only for study but also for use in class.

The packet includes 36 short readings by me, Nathaniel Ward, Roger Williams, John Locke, Jonathan Mayhew, Julia Ward Howe, Abraham Lincoln, Pope Benedict XVI, Dorothy Day, Abraham Kuyper, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, Jack English, Everett E. Gendler, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Milton R. Konvitz, Joseph Storey, Thomas M. Cooley, the Framers of the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Supreme Court, Russell Hittinger, Alexis de Tocqueville, Reinhold Niebuhr, Paul Kurtz, and Francis Schaeffer.

An entirely optional reading, Evangelicals in the Public Square (Budziszewski), will be on reserve at the PCL.

 

Topical outline of the course

Issues in Early America

            Religion and civil authority

Resistance to the English

                        Natural Rights arguments

                        Biblical arguments

The Civil War

                        "God is with the North" (Howe)

                        "No, North and South are both guilty" (Lincoln)

Issues in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century America

            The problem of the all-encroaching state

                        Catholic social thought

                        Protestant social thought

War and peace

            Christian views

                        Just war doctrine

                        Pacifism

            A Jewish view

Civil rights and black power

            "The enemy is injustice" (King)

            "No, the enemy is white people" (Malcolm X)

Civil disobedience

Constitutional jurisprudence

            The original understanding

                        Early constitutional thinkers

                        A roadmap of contemporary jurisprudence

            Free Exercise Clause cases

                        Accommodationism

                        Anti-accommodationism

            Establishment Clause cases:     Neutralism

Hostility to religion?

Secularism and its critics

            Influential arguments about democracy, secularism, and Christianity

            The "culture wars"

                        A secular humanist manifesto

                        An evangelical Protestant manifesto

                        A Catholic perspective

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39090 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 430pm-600pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Course Description

 

Americans are often said to be obsessed with their Constitution.  So be it; but then it behooves us to know something about it.  The approach taken in this course is to return to the early debates surrounding its writing and ratification.  We make no use at all of textbooks; rather we study the political thinking of the early Americans in their own words.

 

Another old saw is that history is written by the winners.  However, this is not be a course in winner-worship:  Equal attention and respect are given, on the one hand, to those who wrote the Constitution and argued for its ratification, and on the other, to those who argued against it or demanded sweeping changes in its content.  There are several good reasons for such evenhandedness.  One is that, for all we know, the losers might have been right.  Another is that they might have had some influence on the winners.  Still a third is that we can't fully understand the arguments by which the winners won unless we understand what they were arguing against.

 

Having spoken of history, I should now admit that this is not a "history course" in the ordinary sense.  Rather it is a course in early American political thought -- in political theory and philosophy.  Another thing that you should understand is that this course puts heavy emphasis on the development of skills in interpretive reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing.  For instance, it doesn't matter that you can read what a writer has written and figure out what he believes.  What matters is whether you can learn to figure out why he believes it, and how it is logically related to other things he believes.  In other words, when you read you are expected to look for arguments, not just propositions.

 

 

Grading Policy

 

Unit 1: Required analytical outline.

 

Unit 2:  Required take-home essay.  Analytical outline for extra credit.

 

Unit 3:  Required take-home essay.  Analytical outline for extra credit.

 

Thirteen short quizzes.

 

Attendance in Supplemental Instruction discussion sections is STRONGLY recommended but not required, and is statistically correlated with better performance and therefore higher grades.

Final grades are calculated in four steps.  First, each student's TWO lowest quiz grades are dropped, and remaining quiz grades averaged.  Second, this average is "curved."  Third, the uncurved exam grades and the curved quiz average are weighted, as follows:

 

            Unit 1 analytical outlines                                                                    25%

            Unit 2 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)       25%

            Unit 3 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)       25%

            Curved quiz average                                                                            25%

 

Class participation and attendance modify grades; see the Course Policies handout.  Scholastic dishonesty results in a failing grade for the course.

 

Texts

 

The following required books have been ordered.  Each book must be purchased.  Bring the books we are using at the moment to class.

 

1. Ralph Ketcham, ed., The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates, excerpts.

 

2. Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, The Federalist, excerpts.

 

3. Herbert J. Storing, ed., with Murray Dry, The Anti-Federalist, excerpts.

 

GOV 382M • Aquinas: Treaties On Law

39370 • Fall 2013
Meets M 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as PHL 387 )
show description

Prerequisites

 

Graduate standing.

 

Course Description

 

Thomas Aquinas is regarded by more than a few scholars as one of the two or three greatest philosophers and theologians in Western history, as well as one of the most illuminating students of Augustine and Aristotle.  His Treatise on Law is the locus classicus of the natural law tradition, and indispensable for anyone seriously interested in ethical philosophy, political philosophy, jurisprudence, natural law, or the respective roles of faith and reason in each of these areas.  Though it is brief, as treatises go, it is not the sort of book one can browse through an evening, and requires close reading.

 

Written in the form of a scholastic disputation, the Treatise takes up 19 disputed questions, for example whether there is such a thing as natural law and whether one may disobey unjust laws.  We will close study each of the first eight (qq. 90-97), as well as a few selections from the other eleven (qq, 98-108), taking them up in sequence and in context.  I say “in context” because the Treatise is but a single part of a much larger work, the Summa Theologiae, which takes up a variety of related matters including the ultimate purpose of human life, the nature of human acts, the passions, the virtues, and the vices.  I do not expect you to be familiar with the whole Summa; we will explore the connections as necessary.

 

Grading Policy

 

Research paper:  2/3.  Vigorous participation in seminar:  1/3.

 

Texts

 

You do not have to purchase the text, because we will be using the Blackfriars translation, which is in the public domain and can be read in various locations on the internet.  For English only, go to http://www.newadvent.org/summa , scroll down and click onSecunda Secundæ Partis” (which means “second part of the second part”), then scroll down again to the section entitled “Law” and select the question that you want.  Latin and English in parallel columns are also available on the internet, and if you want a hard copy, a number of inexpensive printed editions are published, any of which are acceptable so long as they include all of qq. 90-108.  If you would like to compare the Blackfriars translation with a more recent one, I would suggest Alfred J. Freddoso, Treatise on Law: The Complete Text.

GOV 335M • Intel World Of Amer Founders

38636 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 630pm-800pm MEZ 2.124
show description

 

 

GOV 335M • Religion In Amer Pol Thought

38661 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as R S 346 )
show description

 

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38615 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WEL 2.308
show description

Substantial writing component.  Fulfills second half of legislative requirement for 6 hours of American Government.  Includes strongly encouraged, but voluntary, Supplemental Instruction discussion sections, which are statistically associated with higher grades for those students who participate.

 

DESCRIPTION Americans are often said to be obsessed with their Constitution.  So be it; but then it behooves us to know something about it.  The approach taken in this course is to return to the early debates surrounding its writing and ratification.  We make no use at all of textbooks; rather we study the political thinking of the early Americans in their own words.Another old saw is that history is written by the winners.  However, this is not be a course in winner-worship:  Equal attention and respect are given, on the one hand, to those who wrote the Constitution and argued for its ratification, and on the other, to those who argued against it or demanded sweeping changes in its content.  There are several good reasons for such evenhandedness.  One is that, for all we know, the losers might have been right.  Another is that they might have had some influence on the winners.  Still a third is that we can't fully understand the arguments by which the winners won unless we understand what they were arguing against.Having spoken of history, I should now admit that this is not a "history course" in the ordinary sense.  Rather it is a course in early American political thought -- in political theory and philosophy.  Another thing that you should understand is that this course puts heavy emphasis on the development of skills in interpretive reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing.  For instance, it doesn't matter that you can read what a writer has written and figure out what he believes.  What matters is whether you can learn to figure out why he believes it, and how it is logically related to other things he believes.  In other words, when you read you are expected to look for arguments, not just propositions.

 

REQUIREMENTSUnit 1:    Required analytical outline.Unit 2:  Required take-home essay.  Analytical outline for extra credit.Unit 3:  Required take-home essay.  Analytical outline for extra credit.Thirteen short quizzes.Attendance in Supplemental Instruction discussion sections is STRONGLY recommended but not required, and is statistically correlated with better performance and therefore higher grades.Final grades are calculated in four steps.  First, each student's TWO lowest quiz grades are dropped, and remaining quiz grades averaged.  Second, this average is "curved."  Third, the uncurved exam grades and the curved quiz average are weighted, as follows:    Unit 1 analytical outlines                        25%    Unit 2 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)    25%    Unit 3 take-home exam (uncurved, counting extra credit points)    25%    Curved quiz average                            25%Class participation and attendance modify grades; see the Course Policies handout.  Scholastic dishonesty results in a failing grade for the course.

 

TEXTS The following required books have been ordered.  Each book must be purchased.  Bring the books we are using at the moment to class.1. Ralph Ketcham, ed., The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates, excerpts.2. George W. Carey and James McClellan, eds., The Federalist, excerpts.3. Herbert J. Storing, ed., with Murray Dry, The Anti-Federalist, excerpts.

GOV 382M • Natural Law Tradition

38910 • Fall 2011
Meets M 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as PHL 387 )
show description

PREREQUISITES

Graduate standing.

DESCRIPTION

Briefly:  This seminar is designed not only for grad students specializing in Political Theory, but also for several other constituencies in Government, Philosophy, and Law, as explained in the third paragraph, below. It considers the concept of natural law; its sources; the classical synthesis; the modern unraveling of this synthesis; its unexpected contemporary revival; and its critics.  Is there really a natural law?  What difference does it make if there is?  Is it really “natural,” and really “law”?  What are its implications for government, ethics, and jurisprudence?  Can it answer its critics?  Can it do the theoretical and cultural work that some of its proponents hope that it can?

Seminar context:  Ancient and medieval political thinkers held that a humane political order must be grounded on what is naturally good for human beings.  Though for a time they continued to use the older terminology, modern political thinkers increasingly denied that what the classical tradition called "natural law" was truly natural, or -- even if it was truly natural -- that it was truly law.  However, the concept of natural law has continued to exert influence in a number of areas, and our own times have witnessed a modest renaissance and reformation of the classical natural law tradition.

Philosophy students may be interested because of the connection of natural law theory with the revival of neo-Aristotelian and Thomistic meta-ethics. International Relations students may be interested because of the influence of natural law theory on international law, international human rights jurisprudence, international organization, and just war theory.  Comparative Politics students may be interested because of the bearing of natural law theory on the question of cross-cultural universals. Public Law and American Political Development students may be interested because of the influence of natural law theory on American constitutional traditions.  Public Law and Public Policy students may be interested because of how natural law theory addresses the question of whether public moral norms have a rational basis, rather than being arbitrary and invidious.

UNITS

 (1) An Introduction to the Concept Of Natural Law; (2) Some Early Statements of Natural Law; (3) The Classical Synthesis; (4) Late Medieval and Early Modern Experiments and Departures; (5) Natural Law, International Law, and War) I; (6) Natural Law, International Law, and War, II; (7) Natural Law and Human Rights; (8) The American Reception of the Natural Law Tradition; (9) Natural Law in American Jurisprudence; (10) Some Influential Rejections; (11) Various Kinds of Defenses; (12) The Protestant, Jewish, and Islamic Reception of the Natural Law Tradition; and (13) The Catholic Church on the Natural Law Tradition.

GRADING

Research paper:                        2/3Vigorous participation in seminar:                1/3

Students are encouraged to choose research topics that connect natural law theory to their own areas of specialization.

TEXTS

The readings include carefully selected, non-overwhelming excerpts from a large number of authors from ancient times to the present.  All of the readings will be either online or on PCL reserve.  No purchases are required; however) copies of two of my own books) What We Can't Not Know: A Guide (rev. ed.) 2011.) and The Line Through the Heart: Natural Law as Fact) Theory) and Sign of Contradiction (2009) will be available at the bookstore in case anyone does wish to purchase them.

GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory

38870 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 2.202
(also listed as PHL 342 )
show description

 

DESCRIPTION

REQUIREMENTS

For Unit 1, a required analytical outline (20%). For Units 2, 3, and 4, take-home essays (20% apiece). Short-answer quizzes (20%). Extra credit for analytical outlines for Units 2, 3, and 4 (up to 5 points per unit, added to exam grades).

TEXTS

RECOMMENDED:

(1) J. Budziszewski, What We Can't Not Know: A Guide. REQUIRED: (2) C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man. (3) Thomas Aquinas, Treatise on Law. (4) Robert P. George, The Clash of Orthodoxies. (5) Russell Hittinger, The First Grace. (6) Short readings packet available from the UT Copy Center, McCombs 3.136, phone: 471-8281. McCombs is the Business School building, right behind my own building, Mezes. Readings 1-5 are also on reserve at the Perry-Castaneda Library. Lewis is also online at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/augustine/arch/lewis/abolition1.htm , and a version of Aquinas is also online at http://www.newadvent.org/summa/2.htm (scroll down to LAW, and read Questions 90-97). However, you must have copies to bring to class, even if only photocopies or printouts.

 

"Natural law" means moral law -- fundamental moral principles that are built into the design of human nature and lie at the roots of conscience. Historically, natural law thinking provided the basis for talking about all of the 'hot button' issues in past and present culture wars. If you wanted to talk about war, slavery, political liberty, or relations between men and women, you talked about natural law. The distinctive mark of natural law thinking is that it begins from what the mind can know about these things by reasoning alone, not from the authority of revelation. The founders of our own republic believed in the natural law -- in universal and "self-evident" principles of justice and morality that the Declaration of Independence called "the laws of Nature and of Nature's God." For generations, Americans took the reality of natural law for granted. The Declaration of Independence appealed to it to justify independence; Abraham Lincoln appealed to it to criticize slavery; Martin Luther King appealed to it to criticize racial discrimination. You would hardly guess any of this from the present day, because belief in natural law has come to be viewed as "politically incorrect." Nevertheless, the tradition of natural law is experiencing a sort of renaissance, and books about it are pouring off the presses.

Is there really a natural law? What difference does it make to society and politics if there is? Is it really "natural"? Is it really "law"? To consider these questions, we will read a variety of influential works on natural law from the middle ages to the present. Probably, most of your liberal arts education has implicitly rejected the whole idea. In this course you have an opportunity to hear the other side for a change.

GOV 382K • Studies In Polit Thry & Philos

39140 • Spring 2011
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

see syllabus

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38430 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Substantial writing component.  Fulfills 2nd half of legislative requirement for 6 hours of American Government.  Includes voluntary Supplemental Instruction discussion sections.
 
DESCRIPTION
 
Americans are often said to be obsessed with their Constitution.  So be it; but then it behoves us to know something about it.  The approach taken in this course is to return to the early debates surrounding its writing and ratification.  We make no use at all of textbooks; instead, we study the political thinking of the early Americans in their own words.  Equal attention is given, on the one hand, to those who wrote the Constitution and argued for its ratification, and on the other, to those who argued against it or demanded sweeping changes in its content.
 
This is not a history course or a political science course in the ordinary sense.  Think of it as a course in early American political philosophy.  As a "substantial writing component" course, it also puts heavy emphasis on the development of skills in interpretive reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing.  The Supplemental Instruction discussion sections provide extra help, but participation in them is voluntary.
 
REQUIREMENTS
 
For Unit 1, the grade is determined by analytical outlines (25% of course grade).  For each of Units 2 and 3, the grade is determined by 5-page take-home essays (25% each); however, five extra credit points for each of these units can be earned by submitting analytical outlines.   For Unit 2, students will turn in a first draft, for feedback, then a second draft, for a grade.  For Unit 3, students will turn in only the final draft, for a grade.  Thirteen short-answer-format quizzes will also be administered (25%).  SI  discussion section attendance – which is strongly recommended but not required – is statistically correlated with better performance and therefore higher grades.
 
REQUIRED TEXTS
 
The following required books have been ordered.  Each must be purchased.  Bring to class the books that we are using at the moment; also bring your analytical outlines.
 
(1) Ralph Ketcham, ed., The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates.  (2) George W. Carey and James McClellan, eds., The Federalist.  (3) Herbert J. Storing, ed., with Murray Dry, The Anti-Federalist.
 
GOVERNMENT FIELD
 
American Government and Politics.

 

GOV 335M • Intel World Of Amer Founders-W

38800 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CBA 4.328
show description

 

 

GOV 312L • Iss And Policies In Amer Gov-W

39045 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm FAC 21
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 335M • Natural Law Theory-W

38260 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 206
(also listed as PHL 342, WCV 320 )
show description

 

 

GOV 335M • Relign In Amer Pol Thought-W

38265 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 430pm-600pm PAR 1
show description

 

 

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