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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

John McIver

Senior Lecturer

Contact

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

38845 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm SAC 5.102
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Instructor:

McIver, J

 

GOV 350K Course Description

 

Description

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Emphasis here will be on applications of statistic concepts and methods in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding more “technical” political science and public policy literature.

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables, and elementary multivariate statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use STATA to analyze data from Gallup Surveys, the General Social Survey, and the National Election Study in class and for homework assignments including a final paper.

 

Requirements

310L

 

Textbooks

Philip Pollack, Essentials of Political Analysis

Philip Pollock, A STATA Companion to Political Analysis

 

Grading

A midterm and final examination

Lab & home work

Term paper based on analysis of survey data

Attendance and Participation

 

Flag: Quantitative Reasoning

GOV 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

39025 • Fall 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 0.128
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GOV 679HA Course Description/McIver

 

Description

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence designed to help a select group of motivated students complete a Senior Honors thesis.   Students develop an initial research question, hypothesize an answer and propose a research strategy to test that hypothesis.  The research question is the student’s own as is the choice of advisor.  In most cases, students develop a question and then seek advice as to which member of the department faculty might be aide them in answering their question. 

The primary product of the fall semester is “Chapter 1”, a 20-25 page summary of the project to be completed during the spring semester.  This paper includes a research question or hypothesis to be considered, a review of the existing literature on the topic, a research design, a plan for the completion of the project and an extended bibliography of relevant documents. 

Throughout the fall semester writing assignments build on the students’ research interests as well as attempt to engage the student more broadly in the craft of writing.  Students develop bibliographies of prior research, writing and re-write literature reviews, provide proposed research designs, develop a preliminary/short version of Chapter 1 prior to a final chapter 1 of 20-25 pages plus figures, tables and references.

Classwork also engages practical issues underlying research.  A representative of the Office of Research Support regularly attends to describe the process of studying (and protecting) Human Subjects.  The School of Undergraduate Studies/Office of Undergraduate Research provides assistance in training class members in the creation of research posters.  

Requirements

Admission is restricted to applicants who apply during the prior spring semester. Applicants must show ability to sustain a 3.5 GPA in Government and to be accepted for mentoring by a faculty advisor.

Textbooks

As needed for individual projects.

Grading

 

Preliminary writing exercises

Term paper

Attendance and Participation

 

Flags:

 

Writing

Independent Inquiry

GOV 310L • American Government

39005 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 0.102
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Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the institutions, processes and actors that make up the American political system and to encourage you to think critically about the nature and quality of American democracy. To achieve these objectives, I have chosen a textbook that focuses attention of the role of citizens as key actors in the democratic experiment that we call the United States of America.

 

Requirements

None

 

Textbooks

Christine Barbour & Gerald C. Wright, Keeping the Republic, The Essentials (5th Edition/Paper),

Washington DC: CQ Press.  Keeping the Republic provides a simple but powerful framework for helping you to think about how our complicated political system works. The framework will help you see how government, politics and the larger society (economy, society, culture, position in the international system) are deeply and systematically intertwined. The framework is explained in Chapter 1 of the textbook and is referred to frequently throughout the rest of the book.

 

A second required text is the on-line book Texas Politics. We will use this e-book throughout the semester to provide a comparison between the national government and the state government of Texas.

 

A Newspaper.  You are responsible for keeping up to date on major national and local news.

If you choose not to spend the money, you can access many local and national papers on-line and in most cases at no charge. 

 

Web-based and supplemental readings - See the "Syllabus" section of these web pages.

 

Grading

A midterm and final examination

Term paper

Attendance and Participation

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

39185 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
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Description

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Emphasis here will be on applications of statistic concepts and methods in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding more “technical” political science and public policy literature.

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables, and elementary multivariate statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use STATA to analyze data from Gallup Surveys, the General Social Survey, and the National Election Study in class and for homework assignments including a final paper.

 

Requirements

310L

 

Textbooks

Philip Pollack, Essentials of Political Analysis

Philip Pollock, A STATA Companion to Political Analysis

 

Grading

A midterm and final examination

Lab & home work

Term paper based on analysis of survey data

Attendance and Participation

Flag: Quantitative reasoning

GOV 357L • Judicial Process And Behavior

39210 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ B0.306
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Prerequisites

6 hours lower division Government courses

 

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the American legal system with a particular emphasis on the roles of its key actors. The political nature of many legal disputes will be explored as will the legal aspects of many political disputes. This course will also examine the potential (as well as actual) impact of citizen participation at all levels of the legal system.

 

Grading Policy 

Two examinations will be given - a midterm worth 30% of your grade and a comprehensive final exam worth 30%. Two short papers are also required. They are worth 30% of your final grade. Additional assignments and class participation will be worth 10%. Papers must be completed to receive a passing grade in the course.

 

Text

Robert Carp, Ronald Stidham and Kenneth Manning (2014) Judicial Process in America. Washington, DC: CQ Press. 9th ED.

GOV 310L • American Government

38650 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CAL 100
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Prerequisites

None.

 

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the institutions, processes and actors that make up the American and Texas political systems and to encourage you to think critically about the nature and quality of democracy.  Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion and political behavior.  Common themes at both the national and state levels will be explored.

 

Grading Policy

A midterm and final examination

Term Paper

Attendance and Participation

 

Texts

Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright, Keeping the Republic (CQ Press).  A new edition is due January 15th.

Texas Politics (an on-line project of the UT College of Liberal Arts)

A daily newspaper

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

38855 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 303
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Requirements

310L

 

Description

This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistics. Emphasis here will be on applications of statistic concepts and methods in political science. The objective of this course is to help students acquire the literacy for understanding more “technical” political science and public policy literature.

Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, sampling distribution, point estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables, and elementary multivariate statistical procedures. Computing will be an integral part of this course. You will use STATA to analyze data from Gallup Surveys, the General Social Survey, and the National Election Study in class and for homework assignments including a final paper.

 

Grading

A midterm and final examination

Lab & home work

Term paper based on analysis of survey data

Attendance and Participation

 

Textbooks

Philip Pollack, Essentials of Political Analysis

Philip Pollock, A STATA Companion to Political Analysis

GOV 357L • Judicial Process And Behavior

38730 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ B0.306
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Prerequisites

6 hours lower division Government courses

 

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the American legal system with a particular emphasis on the roles of its key actors. The political nature of many legal disputes will be explored as will the legal aspects of many political disputes. This course will also examine the potential (as well as actual) impact of citizen participation at all levels of the legal system.

 

Grading Policy 

Two examinations will be given - a midterm worth 30% of your grade and a comprehensive final exam worth 30%. Two short papers are also required. They are worth 30% of your final grade. Additional assignments and class participation will be worth 10%. Papers must be completed to receive a passing grade in the course.

 

Text

Robert Carp, Ronald Stidham and Kenneth Manning (2011) Judicial Process in America. Washington, DC: CQ Press. 8th Edition

GOV 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

38860 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
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Prerequisites

For 679HA, upper-division standing, admission to the Government Honors Program, and written consent of the Government Honors Program adviser; for 679HB, Government 679HA.

 

Course Description

Lectures and supervised individual research dedicated to the writing of a substantial paper on a special topic in the field of government.

 

Grading Policy

Based on class participation, individual research and successful completion of a preliminary chapter of the thesis.

 

Texts

Readings assigned for individual projects.

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

38700 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JES A209A
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see syllabus

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

38702 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm CAL 221
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see syllabus

GOV 350K • Statistical Anly In Polit Sci

38723 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A215A
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see syllabus

GOV 310L • American Government

38770 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm UTC 2.102A
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See Syllabus

GOV 357L • Judicial Process And Behavior

38938 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.306
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See syllabus

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