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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Xuecheng Liu

Visiting Scholar

Visiting Associate Professor
Xuecheng Liu

Contact

GOV 314 • Big Power Politics In Se Asia

39080 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CBA 4.342
(also listed as ANS 301M )
show description

 

                                                 COURSE DESCRIPTION

                                  GOV 314 (Unique 39080) and ANS301M (Unique 32058)

 

Spring Semester 2014

Instructor: LIU, Xuecheng

Bldg / Room: CBA 4.342

Days & Time: TTh 9:30-11:00 am

Office Hours: Tuesday 14:00-17:00 pm or by appointment

Office: BATTS 3.152    Tel. 512-232-7257

Email: xcliu_ut@yahoo.com

=======================================================

 Regional Integration and Big Power Politics in Southeast Asia

Course Description:

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN, is a successful case of regional cooperation in Asia. It also has posed a puzzle for the study of regional integration in the volatile and fragmented Southeast Asia. Its member states signed the ASEAN Declaration in 1967and the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia (TAC) in 1976, containing the guiding principles for dealing with their relations with one another. Starting in the new century, the ASEAN is committed to establishing an ASEAN Community by 2015. The ASEAN Charter entered into force in 2008, serving as a foundation in achieving the ASEAN Community by providing legal status and institutional framework for ASEAN. This lower division undergraduate course is designed to introduce some basic themes of ASEAN's theory and origins, achievements and challenges in its development, and the so-called the ASEAN Way, codifying norms and values of the ASEAN institutionalization. This course also explores the ASEAN’s contributions to peace and development in the region by creating the ASEAN-centric dialogue mechanisms such as ASEAN plus One, ASEAN plus Three, ASEAN Regional Forum, and East Asian Summit.

 

Prerequisites:

Since this is an introductory course, a background in Asian studies or Government is recommended but not required.

 

Grading Policy:

We will adopt UT's new "plus& minus" grading system in this course. The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments. Note that these percentage grades will be recorded on Blackboard for our purposes only, not be noted on your transcript.

First midterm exam 30 %; Second midterm exam 30 %

Term paper on the ASEAN (6-7 pages) 30 %

(The first draft 15% and the second draft 15%)

Class attendance 10%

 

Letter grade                       GPA             Percentage Score

===================================================

A                                         4.0                 94-100

A-                                        3.67               90-93

B+                                       3.33               87-89

B                                         3.0                 84-86

B-                                        2.67               80-83

C+                                       2.33               77-79

C                                         2.0                 74-76

    C-                                       1.67                70-73

D+                                      1.33                67-69

D                                        1.0                  64-66

D-                                       0.67                60-63

F                                         0                     59 & below

=====================================================

 

Textbooks:

1. Alice D. Ba, (Re) Negotiating East and Southeast Asia (Stanford: Stanford University press, 2009) (Electronic Resource).

2. Amitav Acharya and Richard Stubbs, Theorizing Southeast Asian Relations: Emerging Debates (Dewey: Taylor and Francis, 2013) (Electronic Resource)

    3. Cillian Ryan, EU-ASEAN: Facing Economic Globalisation (Dordrecht: Springer, 2008). (Electronic Resource)

   4. Murray, P., Europe and Asia: Regions in Flux (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). (Electronic resource)

   5. Ian Storey, The United States and ASEAN-China relations: All Quiet on the Southeast Asian Front (Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2007). (Electronic Resource)

6. Selected Documents of the ASEAN (distributed by email)

 

Flag: Global cultures.

 

GOV 347K • Gov And Politics Of South Asia

39170 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as ANS 347K )
show description

Course Description

GOV 347K (Unique 39170) and ANS347K (Unique 32117)

                      

*********************************************************

Spring 2014

Instructor Xuecheng Liu

Bldg / Room: GAR 0.128

Days & Time: TTh 12:30-14:00 

Office: BATTS 3. 152, Tel. 512-232-7257

Office Hours: Tue. 14:00-17:00 or by appointment

Email: xcliu_ut@yahoo.com

 

 

Government and Politics of South Asia

 

 

South Asia is bounded on the south by the Indian Ocean and on land by West Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. This sub-region comprises eight developing countries—Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. South Asia is home to well over one fifth of the world's population, making it the most populous geographical region in the world.

 

Since the end of the Cold War, South Asia has become a focal point of growing international attention and concern by nuclear proliferation, the rise of Islamic militancy and the anti-terror war, the emergence of India as a global power, and regional effort for cooperation. South Asian nations have also been experiencing a profound political evolution of democratization.

 

This course provides students with a comprehensive and systematic introduction to the comparative political study of the eight nations of South Asia. Organized in parallel fashion to facilitate cross-national comparison, the course sections on each nation address several topical areas of inquiry: political culture and heritage, government structure and institutions, political parties and leaders, and social conflict and resolution. India, the preeminent power of the subcontinent, will receive the greatest attention. In treating the international relations of the region, this course will address several predominant region-wide issues: the India–Pakistan conflict, the rise of Islamic militancy and the AfPak war, and regional cooperation under the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC).

 

Prerequisites:

Since this is an introductory course, a background in Asian studies or Government is recommended but not required.

Grading Policy:

 

Two mid-term exams (60%). 

One short term paper (30%, first draft 15% and final draft 15%)

Overall class participation/attendance may be reflected in a plus or minus up to l0 points in determining the course grade.

 

There will be no makeup exams for the mid-term exams. Any student missing a mid-term exam with a verified medical excuse or for an official university event with a letter from the responsible university authority may choose to do an alternative assignment.

 

We will adopt UT's new "plus& minus" grading system in this course. The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments. Note that these percentage scores will be recorded on Blackboard for our purposes only, not be noted on your transcript.

 

Letter grade                                                  GPA                                                     Percentage Score

 

A                                                                                  4.00                                                     94-100 %

A-                                                                                3.67                                                     90-93

B+                                                                                3.33                                                     87-89

B                                                                                  3.00                                                     84-86

B-                                                                                2.67                                                     80-83

C+                                                                                2.33                                                     77-79

C                                                                                  2.00                                                     74-76

C-                                                                                 1.67                                                     70-73

D+                                                                               1.33                                                     67-69

D                                                                                 1.00                                                     64-66

D-                                                                                0.67                                                     60-63

F                                                                                  0.00                                                     59 & below

===================================================

 

Textbooks:

 

The textbooks are all electronic resources and students can read them online or download them by purchase. We will just choose several chapters from each book as reading assignments.

 

  1. Robert C. Oberst, et al, Government and Politics in South Asia, 7th Edition

New York: Westview Press, 2013. (Electronic Resource) [GPSA]

  1. T.V. Paul ed., South Asia’s Weak States, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford Security Studies, 2010. (Electronic Resource) [SAWS]
  2. Lawrence Saez, The South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC),

Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2012. ( Electronic Resource)

  1. During the course of the semester, additional latest articles on South Asia may be added and distributed as required readings in class.

 

References:

 

  1. Paul R. Brass ed., Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal(Hoboken : Taylor & Francis, 2010).

 Flag: Global Cultures.

GOV 347K • Gov And Politics Of South Asia

38850 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as ANS 347K )
show description

Prerequisites:

Since this is an introductory course, a background in Asian studies or Government is recommended but not required.

 

Course Description:

South Asia is bounded on the south by the Indian Ocean and on land by West Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. This sub-region comprises seven developing countries-- Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. South Asia is home to well over one fifth of the world's population, making it the most populous geographical region in the world.

Since the end of the Cold War, South Asia has become a focal point of growing international attention and concern by nuclear proliferation, the rise of Islamic militancy and the anti-terror war, the emergence of India as a global power, and regional effort for cooperation. South Asian nations have also been experiencing a profound political evolution of democratization.

This course provides students with a comprehensive and systematic introduction to the comparative political study of the seven nations of South Asia. Organized in parallel fashion to facilitate cross-national comparison, the course sections on each nation address several topical areas of inquiry: political culture and heritage, government structure and institutions, political parties and leaders, and social conflict and resolution. India, the preeminent power of the subcontinent, will receive the greatest attention. In treating the international relations of the region, this course will address several predominant region-wide issues: the India–Pakistan conflict, the rise of Islamic militancy and the AfPak war, and regional cooperation under the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC).

 

Grading Policy

Two mid-term exams (60%). 

One short term paper (30%, first draft 15% and final draft 15%)

Overall class participation/attendance may be reflected in a plus or minus up to l0 points in determining the course grade.

There will be no makeup exams for the mid-term exams. Any student missing a mid-term exam with a verified medical excuse or for an official university event with a letter from the responsible university authority may choose to do an alternative assignment.

 

Texts

The textbooks are all electronic resources and students can read them online or download them by purchase. We will just choose several chapters from each book as reading assignments.

Yogendra K. Malik et al, Government and politics in South Asia, 6th Edition (Electronic Resource) Boulder, Col.: Westview Press, 2009.

Paul R. Brass ed., Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, (Electronic Resource) Hoboken : Taylor & Francis, 2010.

T.V. Paul ed., South Asia Weak States, (Electronic Resource) Stanford, Calif.: Stanford Security Studies, 2010.

Lawrence Saez, The South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC), ( Electronic Resource) Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2012.

During the course of the semester, additional latest articles on South Asia may be added and distributed as required readings in class.

 

GOV 365L • China And The New Asian Region

38940 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.106
show description

Prerequisites

6 SEMESTER HOURS OF LOWER-DIVISION COURSEWORK IN GOVERNMENT, INCLUDES CROSS-CULTURAL CONTENT.

 

Course Description:

The new Asian region has four parts: Northeast Asia (includes Russia's Far East), Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Central Asia. While the U.S. sustains a favored military presence and is the strongest force, it is no longer a hegemonic power in the region. There is no region-wide organization, though ASEAN, ARF, "ASEAN plus Three," “ASEAN plus Eight,” world's tigers continues to advance economically, if unevenly. It holds the world’s largest democracy (India) and the largest one-party authoritarian regime (China). It is riddled with ethnic and territorial conflicts. It experienced colonialism first-hand through the mid-20th century. And it remains a key arena of global politics. Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States has taken the lead in the campaign against international terrorism in Asia. The anti-terror war and Asian regionalism have changed the geopolitical map in Asia. We will explore China’s rise and its foreign policy reasoning in light of the regional characteristics, and consider implications for US-China relations.

  

Grading Policy:

  1. Two take-home essays (6-7 pages) 50%
  2. One 12-page term paper, 40%

Note: Writing of the term paper includes the paper proposal, the first draft (15 points), and the second (revised) draft (20 points), and the final draft (5 points).

    3.  Class participation, 10%

 

Texts

REQUIRED:

  1. Ashley J. Tellis, Travis Tanner, and Jessica Keough eds, Strategic Asia 2011-12: Asia's Responds to Its Rising Powers, (Seattle:The National Bureau of Asian Research, 2011). (Electronic Resource)
  2. Abraham Denmark, China Arrival: A Strategic Framework for a Global Relationship(Center for a New American Security, 2009). http://www.cnas.org/files/documents/publications/CNAS%20China's%20Arrival_Final%20Report.pdf
  3. Kurt M. Campbell, The Power of Balance: America in Asia (Center for a New Security,2008). http://www.cnas.org/files/documents/publications/CampbellPatelSingh_iAsia_June08.pdf
  4. Ralph A. Cossa, The United States and the Asia-Pacific Region: Security Strategy for the Obama Administration (Center for a New American Security, 2009). http://www.cnas.org/files/documents/publications/CossaPatel_US_Asia-Pacific_February2009.pdf
  5. Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World (National Intelligence Council, 2008). http://www.dni.gov/nic/NIC_2025_project.html

REFERENCES: ( No purchase required)

  1. Johnston & Ross, Engaging China: the Management of an Emerging Power, Routledge, 1999. ( The introduction and conclusion)

Selected conference papers, academic articles, and research reports will be distributed 

GOV 314 • Big Power Politics In Se Asia

38590 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 2.124
show description

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN, is a successful case of regional cooperation in Asia. It also has posed a puzzle for the study of regional integration in the volatile and fragmented Southeast Asia. Its member states signed the ASEAN Declaration in 1967and the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia (TAC) in 1976, containing the guiding principles for dealing with their relations with one another. Starting in the new century, the ASEAN is committed to establishing an ASEAN Community by 2015. The ASEAN Charter entered into force in 2008, serving as a foundation in achieving the ASEAN Community by providing legal status and institutional framework for ASEAN. This lower division undergraduate course is designed to introduce some basic themes of ASEAN's theory and origins, achievements and challenges in its development and the so-called the ASEAN Way, codifying norms and values of the ASEAN institutionalization. This course also explores the ASEAN’s contributions to peace and development in the region by creating the ASEAN-centric dialogue mechanisms such as ASEAN plus One, ASEAN plus Three, ASEAN Regional Forum, and East Asian Summit.

Prerequisites:

Since this is an introductory course, a background in Asian studies or Government is recommended but not required.

Grading Policy

We will adopt UT's new "plus& minus" grading system in this course. The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments. Note that these percentage grades will be recorded on Blackboard for our purposes only, not be noted on your transcript.

First midterm exam 30 %

Second midterm exam 30 %

Term paper on the ASEAN (5-7 pages) 30 %

Class attendance 10%

Textbooks:

1. Alice D. Ba, (Re) Negotiating East and Southeast Asia (Stanford: Stanford University press, 2009) ( Required and available at the University Co-op).

2. Amitav Acharya, Constructing a Security Community in Southeast Asia: ASEAN and the Problem of Regional Order (Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2009). (Electronic Resource)

3. ISEAS. Know Your ASEAN  2nd Edition. (Singapore : Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2010). [electronic resource]

4. Cillian Ryan, EU-ASEAN: Facing Economic Globalisation (Dordrecht: Springer, 2008). (Electronic Resource)

5. Murray, P., Europe and Asia : Regions in Flux (New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). (electronic resource)

6. Ian Storey, The United States and ASEAN-China relations: All Quiet on the Southeast Asian Front (Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College,2007). (Electronic Resource).

7. Jianren Lu, China - ASEAN (Paths International, 2010). [electronic resource].

8. Professor’s Packet: Selected latest analytical articles and Documents of the ASEAN (distributed in class)

GOV 365L • Asian Regnalism/Multilat Coop

38795 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 5.102
show description

Course Description:

Asia’s rise as a region will shape the future world order. Asian regionalism as a vitally important dimension of Asia’s rise has attracted critical attention of Asia experts and policy makers. This course first addresses the nature, functional principles, leadership, and policy making process of contemporary Asian regionalism in comparison with the experiences of European integration. It also explores the linkage between the momentum of Asian integration and contemporary Asian nationalism. Then it  will introduce and assess the origins and its developments of leading regional cooperation mechanisms: ASEAN, Six-Party Talks (Northeast Asian Security Cooperation Architecture), SAARC, and SCO. Finally, in terms of engaging with the Asian multilateral cooperation it will discuss polices and strategies of major powers, particularly, the United States and China.

This course contains four main parts:

1, Comparison between Asian regionalism and European experiences: concept, principles, leadership, and policy making process;

2. Asian regionalism and Asian nationalism: explore the linkage between the emerging Asian cooperation and contemporary Asian nationalism, focusing on Chinese nationalism, Indian nationalism, and Japanese nationalism;

3. Introduce four most important cooperation mechanisms: Association of Southeast Asian Nations ( ASEAN) in Southeast Asia; Six-party talks ( Northeast Asian Security Cooperation Architecture) in Northeast Asia; South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation ( SAARC) in South Asia; and Shanghai Cooperation Organization ( SCO) in Central Asia;

4. Major powers' responses to Asian cooperation: focus on American and Chinese strategies for engaging with Asian integration and multilateral cooperation.

Grading Policy:

We will adopt UT's new "plus& minus" grading system in this course. The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments. Note that these percentage grades will be recorded on Blackboard for our purposes only, not be noted on your transcript.1. Two take-home essays (5 pages) 50%

2. 12-page term paper, 40%

Note: Writing of the term paper includes the paper proposal, the first draft (15 points), and the second ( revised) draft (20 points), and the final draft (5 points).3. Class participation, 10%

Textbooks:

1.Frost, Ellen L., Asia’s New Regionalism Boulder. Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publications, 2008. ISBN 978-1-58826-579-1 ( pbk. alk. paper)

2.. Murray, P., Europe and Asia Regions in flux, New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2008. ( Electronic Resource)

3. Aggarwal, Vind K., Asia’s New Institutional Architecture Dordrecht : Springer, 2007. ISBN 9783540723899 (electronic Resource)

4. Dieter, Heribert, Evolution of Regionalism in Asia: Economic and Security Issues Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2007. ISBN 9780203937433 (Electronic Resource)

5. Dent, Christopher M., East Asian Regionalism Hoboken: Taylor and Francis, 2008. ISBN 9780203946428 (Electronic Resource)

6. Pempel, T. J., Regionalism, Economic Integration and Security in Asia: Cheltenham : Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, 2011. [electronic resource]

7. Professor’s Packet ( Selected chapters of the recently published books and journal articles)

GOV 365L • China And The New Asian Region

39007 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 5.102
show description

See syllabus

GOV 365L • Asian Regnalism/Multilat Coop

38633 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.120
show description

Course Description:

Asia’s rise as a region will shape the future world order. Asian regionalism as a vitally important dimension of Asia’s rise has attracted critical attention of Asia experts and policy makers. This course first addresses the nature, functional principles, leadership, and policy making process of contemporary Asian regionalism in comparison with the experiences of European integration. We also explore the linkage between the momentum of Asian integration and contemporary Asian nationalism. Then we will introduce and assess the origins and its developments of leading regional cooperation mechanisms: ASEAN, Six-Party Talks (Northeast Asian Security Cooperation Architecture), SAARC, and SCO. Finally, in terms of engaging with the Asian multilateral cooperation we will discuss polices and strategies of major powers, particularly, the United States and China.

This course contains four main parts:
1, Comparison between Asian regionalism and European experiences: concept, principles, leadership, and policy making process;
2. Asian regionalism and Asian nationalism: explore the linkage between the emerging Asian cooperation and contemporary Asian nationalism, focusing on Chinese nationalism, Indian nationalism, and Japanese nationalism;
3. Introduce four most important cooperation mechanisms: Association of Southeast Asian Nations ( ASEAN) in Southeast Asia; Six-party talks ( Northeast Asian Security Cooperation Architecture) in Northeast Asia; South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation ( SAARC) in South Asia; and Shanghai Cooperation Organization ( SCO) in Central Asia;
4. Major powers' responses to Asian cooperation: focus on American and Chinese strategies for engaging with Asian Integration and multilateral cooperation.

Grading Policy:

1.    Three take-home essays (5 pages) 60%
2.    12-page term paper, 30%
      Note: Writing of the term paper includes the paper proposal, the first draft
(10 points), and the second ( revised) draft (15 points), and the final draft
(5 points).
3.    Class participation, 10%
    

Textbooks:

1. Frost, Ellen L., Asia’s New Regionalism    
    Boulder. Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publications, 2008.
   ISBN 978-1-58826-579-1 ( pbk. alk. paper)
2. Murray, P., Europe and Asia Regions in flux
    New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2008. ( Electronic Resource)
3. Aggarwal, Vind K., Asia’s New Institutional Architecture
Dordrecht : Springer, 2007.
ISBN 9783540723899 (electronic Resource)
4. Dieter, Heribert, Evolution of Regionalism in Asia: Economic and Security Issues
    Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2007.
    ISBN 9780203937433 (Electronic Resource)
5. Dent, Christopher M., East Asian Regionalism
Hoboken: Taylor and Francis, 2008.
ISBN 9780203946428 (Electronic Resource)
6. Professor’s Packet ( Selected chapters of the recently published books and
     journal articles)

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