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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Michael R. Anderson

Affiliated Faculty, Adjuncts and Lecturers Ph.D., 2009, University of Texas at Austin

Affiliated Faculty

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

40220-40235 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 900am-1000am ART 1.102
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This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ new interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry.
Class time will be divided evenly between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance in weekly online discussions, periodic in-class short-answer responses and multiple-choice quizzes, a mid-term paper and a final essay.


Course Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students will have the ability to:
1)    describe a broad array of global issues confronting international actors
2)    evaluate the role of the United States in the contemporary era of “globalization”
3)    identify and analyze in some detail the scholarly debate surrounding a particular global challenge or crisis

IRG 320F • Found Intl Rels/Gloal Stds-Fra

40240 • Fall 2014
Meets
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IRG 320F (UT in Paris 2014) course description

 

This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in a particular subject area related to International Relations and Global Studies, providing a link between the introductory course (IRG 301) and capstone seminar (IRG 378) for IRG majors. The scope and the theme of the course cross-cut the broad subject areas of the major’s four tracks: international security; international political economy; science, technology, and the environment; and culture, media, and the arts. 

 

There are two over-arching objectives of this course. The first is to examine in detail some key ideological concepts underpinning the perspectives of those pursuing an IRG major, especially “internationalism,” “globalism,” and “regionalism.” Using insights from history, political science, economics, geography, anthropology, and area studies, we will ask how these “-isms” shape our view of contemporary global affairs. What they can tell us about the nature of today’s international system, the possibility of political and economic global governance, as well as international civil society? A second, related objective is to help students conceive a project for their capstone seminar, normally taken soon after the completion of IRG 320F. Through the process of writing a research proposal and delivering an oral presentation to the class on their proposed subject, students in this course will lay the foundation for a successful capstone seminar experience.

 

For the UT in Paris program, this course has been specially designed to take full advantage of the location. In many ways, Paris is an ideal setting in which to base a course centered on the broad themes of international relations and global studies. Over hundreds of years, Paris has earned a reputation as one of the most important international cities of the world. It houses the headquarters of several key intergovernmental as well as nongovernmental organizations; it serves as a critical node in the world of art and fashion; indeed, for many years the city’s cultural offerings represented the apex of what many considered to be “civilized” and “cosmopolitan.” Through numerous excursions to Paris-based organizations – the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the Académie Diplomatique Internationale (ADI), among others – students will see first-hand the work of diplomats, businesspeople, scholars, and activists, engaged in constructing the basis of a still-emerging and hotly contested international order. 

 

Readings:

 

PDF articles will be posted on Blackboard. No required books.

 

 

Grading breakdown:

 

Assignment                                         Value (percent)

Attendance/participation                     10

Blackboard discussion                        15

Reading Response Essay 1                 20

Reading Response Essay 2                 20

Research Project Proposal                  25

Oral Presentation                              10

IRG 678HA • Honors Tutorial Course

40265 • Fall 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 2.102
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IRG 678 HA – Fall 2014

 

Course Description:

  

IRG 678HA is the first semester of a two-semester sequence designed for students admitted to the International Relations and Global Studies honors program. The class is designed to prepare selected senior IRG majors to undertake an honors thesis and to complete it within an academic year. The class format of IRG 678HA consists of a weekly workshop in which participants discuss relevant topics concerning the researching and writing of a substantial and original piece of work (i.e. 50-60 pages) related to one of the IRG major’s four subject tracks: International Security; International Political Economy; Science, Technology and the Environment; and Culture, Media, and the Arts. The incorporation of previous coursework in multiple disciplines, study-abroad experience, and foreign-language sources is strongly encouraged.   

 

As instructor of record in the IRG honors program tutorial sequence, Dr. Anderson has agreed to act as supervisor for all IRG honors theses. Students in IRG 678HA/HB, however, are strongly encouraged to find another instructor at the University of Texas willing to serve as a second reader of the thesis.

 

Required Text: 

 

Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (Chicago, 8th edition, 2013).

 

All other readings will be posted on Blackboard and announced in advance of class.

 

Grading Breakdown:

 

Student grades will be based on:

 

1)    Faithful attendance and participation at all class sessions (30 percent)

2)    Completion of weekly reading/writing assignments (30 percent)

3)    Completion of a working outline, literature review, and project schedule for Spring 2014 (40 percent)

IRG 320F • Foundatn Intl Rels/Global Stds

40575 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.102
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Course description and objectives

 

This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in a particular subject area related to international relations and global studies, providing a link between the introductory course (IRG 301) and capstone seminar (IRG 378) for IRG majors. The scope and the theme of the course cross-cut the broad subject areas the major’s four tracks: international security; international political economy; science, technology, and the environment; and culture, media, and the arts. 

 

There are two over-arching objectives of this course. The first is to examine in some detail ideological concepts related to the IRG major, especially “internationalism,” “globalism,” and “regionalism.” Using insights from history, political science, economics, geography, anthropology, and area studies, we will ask how these “-isms” shape our view of contemporary global affairs. What they can tell us about the nature of today’s international system/systems, the possibility of political and economic global governance, as well as international civil society?

 

A second, related objective is to help students conceive a project for their capstone seminar, normally taken soon after the completion of IRG 320F. Students are required to select a topic of global or regional importance and write a literature review of scholarly articles related to that subject. Through this process, students are exposed to the contemporary academic debates surrounding that subject, and thus are better prepared to complete a capstone project in IRG 378.

 

Required:

 

  • Mark Mazower, Governing the World: The History of an Idea (Penguin Press HC, 2012). ISBN 978-1594203497
  • Kishore Mahbubani, The Great Convergence: Asia, the West, and the Logic of One World (PublicAffairs, 2013). ISBN 978-1610390330

Recommended:

  • Sheldon Anderson et al., International Studies: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Global Issues (Westview Press, 2nd ed., 2013). ISBN 978-0813345888

Grading breakdown

 

  1. Attendance (5 percent)
  2. Response papers (10 percent)
  3. First exam (20 percent)
  4. Second exam (20 percent)
  5. Third exam (20 percent)
  6. Literature review (25 percent)

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40597 • Spring 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm GDC 1.406
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This course is restricted to IRG majors. For IRG program information please contact Dr. Michael Anderson, Director.

The concluding, capstone seminar for the International Relations & Global Studies major is designed to give you an opportunity to draw on your program of studies to prepare a rigorous analysis of a specific aspect of contemporary world affairs.  You have the choice of two formats.  One is a tightly organized research paper; the other is structured as a policy paper directed at a senior decision-maker in a national government or international organization. 

It is profitable to all to set a number of themes for the seminar.  That enhances exchanges and allows for collaborative projects. Still, students will be given reasonable latitude in selecting topics that interest them and/or on which they have acquired specialized knowledge.  We will examine closely the nature of the policy paper and its organization as the semester progresses.  The seminar paper – in either format -  should be viewed as representative of your abilities at this stage in your career and, as such, an effective way of presenting yourself and your abilities.

 The following is a short list of possible themes: democracy promotion as an instrument of foreign policy; the strains among three standards to assess global economic interdependence: growth, equity and stability; the ethical dimensions of the use of force; the interplay of domestic politics and foreign policy process/substance.

IRG 320F • Foundatn Intl Rels/Global Stds

40505 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.102
show description

 

Course Description 

This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in a particular subject area related to international relations and global studies, providing a link between the introductory course (IRG 301) and capstone seminar (IRG 378) for IRG majors. The scope and the theme of the course cross-cut the broad subject areas the major’s four tracks: international security; international political economy; science, technology, and the environment; and culture, media, and the arts. 

There are two over-arching objectives of this course. The first is to examine in some detail ideological concepts related to the IRG major, especially “internationalism,” “globalism,” “cosmopolitanism,” and “regionalism.” Using insights from history, political science, geography, anthropology, and area studies, we will ask how these “isms” shape our view of contemporary global affairs. What they can tell us about the nature of today’s international system/systems, the possibility of political and economic global governance, as well as international civil society?

A second, related objective is to help students conceive a project for their capstone seminar, normally taken soon after the completion of IRG 320F. Students are required to select a topic of global or regional importance and write a literature review of scholarly articles related to that subject. Through this process, students are exposed to the contemporary academic debates surrounding that subject, and thus are better prepared to complete a capstone project in IRG 378.

 

Grading Policy 

  1. Attendance (5 percent of term grade)
  2. Response papers (10 percent)
  3. First exam (25 percent)
  4. Second exam (25 percent)
  5. Literature review
  1. Topic and list of articles (5 percent)
  2. Critical summary of articles (10 percent)
  3. Final draft (20 percent)

 

Texts

TBA

IRG 320F • Foundatn Intl Rels/Global Stds

40120 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.102
show description

Prerequisites

IRG 301, 60 hours of coursework

Course Description

This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in a particular subject area related to international relations and global studies, providing a link between the introductory course (IRG 301) and capstone seminar (IRG 378) for IRG majors. The scope and the theme of the course will cross-cut the broad subject areas of international security; international political economy; science, technology, and the environment; and culture, media, and the arts. The format of this course is structured around background readings and lectures provided by the instructor, interspersed with numerous guest lectures from distinguished faculty around the UT campus.

Grading Policy

Attendance (5 percent of term grade); midterm exam (30 percent); final exam (40 percent), and one essay of 1500-1700 words (25 percent).

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

40135 • Spring 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm JES A205A
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Prerequisites

IRG 301, 90 hours of coursework

Course description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major, and is meant to be taken during one’s final year of study.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue relating to culture, media and the arts; or science, environment, and technology. Globalization will provide the overarching perspective into these related issues.

Grading Policy

Reading responses (25 percent); attendance and participation (10 percent); paper proposal (5 percent); rough draft (20 percent); oral presentation (10 percent); and final draft (30 percent).

 

IRG 320F • Foundatn Intl Rels/Global Stds

39978 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm FAC 21
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This course is designed to introduce IRG majors to the myriad ways of approaching contemporary global challenges.  During the semester, students will have the opportunity to study these global challenges through the diverse perspectives of various faculty members from around the university, who will provide their unique insights into these concerns. They will address such matters as: What is at the root of the most pressing global issues today? How do different scholarly disciplines shape the way in which we view these issues?  And last but not least, how might students best address themselves to meeting and overcoming such challenges?

Lectures and readings will vary week to week. Final grades will be determined through reading responses as well as a comprehensive essay. Although this course is primarily lecture-based, there will be significant opportunity for classroom discussion and debate.

IRG S301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

85865 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am JGB 2.202
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Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary major of International Relations and Global Studies. Drawing from the diverse scholarly perspectives of history, government, economics, sociology, geography, religious studies and anthropology, IRG 301 provides an overview of contemporary global issues, and offers students a window into the four thematic “tracks” they can follow as a major: 1) culture, media, and the arts; 2) international security; 3) science, technology, and the environment; and 4) international political economy.

Lectures and readings will center around a number of questions related to contemporary global concerns, such as: To what extent can the past several decades be described as an “American century,” and to what degree is this no longer the case? What were the fundamental pillars of the international economy after World War II, and how have they shifted since then? To what extent has economic and cultural globalization merely been a mask for Westernization? What are the consequences of the so-called “rise of the rest” – greater peace and prosperity among nations and peoples, or the greater likelihood of conflict and ecological catastrophe? 

This course is primarily lecture-based, but with significant opportunity for regular classroom discussion. 

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39985 • Spring 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.202
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation with the instructor, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue.  International Security serves as an overarching theme for the semester.  Students will have the opportunity to explore topics concerning this subject, from the debates over nuclear weapons and terrorism to international institutions and the question of human and environmental security.

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39987 • Spring 2012
Meets M 400pm-700pm SZB 524
show description

This upper-level research seminar fulfills part of the requirement for the International Relations and Global Studies major.  Through readings, weekly discussions and individual consultation with the instructor, this seminar provides students the opportunity to produce a significant paper of original research on a topic dealing with a contemporary global issue.  

Students following the tracks of Culture, Media, and the Arts; as well as Science, Technology, and the Environment, are encouraged to pursue this capstone seminar.  

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

39910 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 203
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see syllabus

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

39920 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 301
show description

see syllabus

IRG 378 • Capstone Research In Irg

39933 • Fall 2011
Meets W 400pm-700pm MEZ 1.210
show description

see syllabus

IRG F301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

85840 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm MEZ 1.120
show description

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the West (and the United States in particular) dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry. 

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

40295 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ B0.306
show description

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ new interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry.
Class time will be divided evenly between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance in weekly online discussions, periodic in-class short-answer responses and multiple-choice quizzes, a mid-term paper and a final essay.


Course Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students will have the ability to:
1)    describe a broad array of global issues confronting international actors
2)    evaluate the role of the United States in the contemporary era of “globalization”
3)    identify and analyze in some detail the scholarly debate surrounding a particular global challenge or crisis

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

39850 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BEL 328
show description

Course Description:  

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ new interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry. 

Class time will be divided evenly between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance in weekly online discussions, periodic in-class short-answer responses and multiple-choice quizzes, a mid-term paper and a final essay.

Course Objectives:

By the end of the semester, students will have the ability to:

1)    describe a broad array of global issues confronting international actors

2)    evaluate the role of the United States in the contemporary era of “globalization”

3)    identify and analyze in some detail the scholarly debate surrounding a particular global challenge or crisis

Required Books:

  • Andrew J. Bacevich, American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U.S. Diplomacy (Harvard University Press, 2002). 
  • Joseph E. Stiglitz, Making Globalization Work (Norton, 2007). 
  • James L. Watson, ed., Golden Arches East: McDonald’s in East Asia (2nd edition, Stanford University Press, 2007). 
  • Michael Casey, Che’s Afterlife: The Legacy of an Image (Vintage, 2009). 
  • Fareed Zakaria, The Post-American World (Norton, 2008). 

All other readings will be posted online on the class blackboard site.

Grading Breakdown:

  • Discussion (15 percent): At the beginning of the semester students will select one of the five major books for which they will serve as discussion leaders.  These students will be responsible for posting a discussion question each weekend on blackboard (by Sunday evening) to the reading set for Tuesday.  The rest of the class will be responsible for responding to one of the discussion questions by Monday evening.  Questions and responses do not need to be longer than 2-3 sentences.  They should attempt to open up avenues for further discussion during class that week.

 Students are expected to contribute to in-class discussion on a regular basis.  At the beginning of the semester students will select one day in which they will be responsible for bringing into class a news article about an event or issue relevant to the course.  In general, the discussion grade will be based on the consistency and quality of a student’s contributions during the semester.

  • In-class responses (20 percent): Ten times (unannounced in advance) during the semester, the instructor will ask students to take out a sheet of paper and respond to a short question regarding a theme or concept from the reading assignment for that day.  These responses will take no more than 10-15 minutes and should consist of one substantial paragraph.  These responses will be graded with a check minus (0 points), a check (1 point) or check plus (2 points), based upon the clarity, cogency and coherence of the answer.
  • Multiple choice quizzes (15 percent):  Three times during the semester (see course schedule), the instructor will have students take a 10-question multiple-choice quiz based on terms from lectures.  The instructor will provide the relevant terms at each class meeting. 
  • Book review essay (15 percent):  Students will write a comparative book review essay of no more than 2000 words, using the books by Andrew Bacevich, Joseph Stiglitz, and James Watson.  The title of the book review essay should be: “Globalization: The Americanization of the World?”   
  • Final essay (35 percent):  Students will choose a topic in international relations and global studies to explore in greater depth through a final essay.  Students will be required to submit a one-page proposal and bibliography (5 percent) before embarking on the essay itself (30 percent).  Final papers should consist of a review of the recent scholarly debate over the subject, and be 3500-4000 words in length.  A more thorough explanation of the criteria for evaluating these essays will be handed out to students by mid-semester.
  • Overall semester averages will earn the following letter grades:

93-100: A            90-92: A-

87-89: B+            83-86: B            80-82: B-

77-79: C+            73-76: C            70-72: C-

67-69: D+            63-66: D            60-62: D-            0-59:   F

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

85301 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 206
show description

Course Description:  

 

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ new interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry. 

 

Class time will be divided evenly between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance in weekly online discussions, periodic in-class short-answer responses and multiple-choice quizzes, a mid-term paper and a final essay.

 

Course Objectives:

 

By the end of the semester, students will have the ability to:

1)    describe a broad array of global issues confronting international actors

2)    evaluate the role of the United States in the contemporary era of “globalization”

3)    identify and analyze in some detail the scholarly debate surrounding a particular global challenge or crisis

 

Required Books:

  • Andrew J. Bacevich, American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U.S. Diplomacy (Harvard University Press, 2002).
  • Joseph E. Stiglitz, Making Globalization Work (Norton, 2007).
  • James L. Watson, ed., Golden Arches East: McDonald’s in East Asia (2nd edition, Stanford University Press, 2007).
  • Michael Casey, Che’s Afterlife: The Legacy of an Image (Vintage, 2009).
  • Fareed Zakaria, The Post-American World (Norton, 2008).

 

All other readings will be posted online on the class blackboard site.

 

Grading Breakdown:

 

  • Discussion (15 percent): At the beginning of the semester students will select one of the five major books for which they will serve as discussion leaders.  These students will be responsible for posting a discussion question each weekend on blackboard (by Sunday evening) to the reading set for Tuesday.  The rest of the class will be responsible for responding to one of the discussion questions by Monday evening.  Questions and responses do not need to be longer than 2-3 sentences.  They should attempt to open up avenues for further discussion during class that week.

 

Students are expected to contribute to in-class discussion on a regular basis.  At the beginning of the semester students will select one day in which they will be responsible for bringing into class a news article about an event or issue relevant to the course.  In general, the discussion grade will be based on the consistency and quality of a student’s contributions during the semester.

 

  • In-class responses (20 percent): Ten times (unannounced in advance) during the semester, the instructor will ask students to take out a sheet of paper and respond to a short question regarding a theme or concept from the reading assignment for that day.  These responses will take no more than 10-15 minutes and should consist of one substantial paragraph.  These responses will be graded with a check minus (0 points), a check (1 point) or check plus (2 points), based upon the clarity, cogency and coherence of the answer.

 

  • Multiple choice quizzes (15 percent):  Three times during the semester (see course schedule), the instructor will have students take a 10-question multiple-choice quiz based on terms from lectures.  The instructor will provide the relevant terms at each class meeting. 

 

  • Book review essay (15 percent):  Students will write a comparative book review essay of no more than 2000 words, using the books by Andrew Bacevich, Joseph Stiglitz, and James Watson.  The title of the book review essay should be: “Globalization: The Americanization of the World?”   

 

  • Final essay (35 percent):  Students will choose a topic in international relations and global studies to explore in greater depth through a final essay.  Students will be required to submit a one-page proposal and bibliography (5 percent) before embarking on the essay itself (30 percent).  Final papers should consist of a review of the recent scholarly debate over the subject, and be 3500-4000 words in length.  A more thorough explanation of the criteria for evaluating these essays will be handed out to students by mid-semester.

 

 

 

 

  • Overall semester averages will earn the following letter grades:

93-100: A            90-92: A-

87-89: B+            83-86: B            80-82: B-

77-79: C+            73-76: C            70-72: C-

67-69: D+            63-66: D            60-62: D-            0-59:   F

IRG 301 • Intro Intl Rels & Global Stds

40245 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 GAR 1.126
show description

This course serves as an introduction to the College of Liberal Arts’ new interdisciplinary major, International Relations and Global Studies.  Students will engage with many broad questions relating to the contemporary world, including:  How has the modern international system come into being?  What are the major opportunities and challenges related to the world-wide movement of capital, goods and ideas we have come to define as globalization?  To what extent does the United States dominate the geopolitical, economic and cultural landscape today?  Finally, are we entering a “post-American world,” and if so, what global repercussions might this entail?  This course will attempt to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of social sciences—whether political science, economics, or anthropology—and instead ask students to take a more holistic view of global issues, rooted in historical inquiry.
Class time will be divided evenly between lecture material and discussion.  Students will be evaluated based upon their performance in weekly online discussions, periodic in-class short-answer responses and multiple-choice quizzes, a mid-term paper and a final essay.


Course Objectives:
By the end of the semester, students will have the ability to:
1)    describe a broad array of global issues confronting international actors
2)    evaluate the role of the United States in the contemporary era of “globalization”
3)    identify and analyze in some detail the scholarly debate surrounding a particular global challenge or crisis

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