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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Rachel Wellhausen

Assistant Professor Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Rachel Wellhausen

Contact

Biography

Professor Wellhausen's primary field of interest is the political economy of international investment and finance. Her forthcoming book with Cambridge University Press (October 2014), The Shield of Nationality: When Governments Break Contracts with Foreign Firms, examines the conditions under which governments maintain or break the contracts they enter into with foreign investors. Fieldwork included interviews with executives and government officials in Ukraine, Moldova, and Romania, with follow-up work in Russia and Azerbaijan. The dissertation on which the book is based won the 2013 Mancur Olson award from the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation in political economy in 2011-2012. Professor Wellhausen is co-editor of Production in the Innovation Economy (MIT Press 2014), which resulted from MIT's interdisciplinary project on innovation and production. She has published in the Journal of Conflict Resolution, Business and Politics, and other outlets.

Professor Wellhausen received her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She holds a M.Sc. with Distinction in European Political Economy: Transition from the London School of Economics. She is a graduate of the Honors College at the University of Arizona and earned a B.A. in Economics, a B.A. in English with Honors, and a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies (Russian and Slavic Studies, German Studies, and Political Science).

Interests

International political economy

GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Hon

38724 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.120
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GOV 312 with Writing Flag • Issues & Policies In American Government: US in the World Economy

 This course explores the changing role of the US in the world economy, from the 1800s through the present, and the consequences of that role for American politics today. Some of the key issues to be explored include: Is globalization really a new phenomenon, and is it irreversible? What are the effects of globalization on wages and inequality, social safety nets, production, innovation, and crisis in the United States? How does the United States interact with developing countries in an interconnected global economy? The requirements include two essays that will be substantially revised and expanded throughout the semester. No prerequisites are required.

 

Grading Policy:

Peer review, attendance, participation       20%

Essay 1: First draft                                        10%

Essay 1: Final draft                                       20%

Essay 2: First draft                                        20%

Essay 2: Final draft                                       30%

 

Textbooks:

Tyler Cowen (2011). The Great Stagnation.

Pietra Rivoli (2005). The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy: An Economist Examines the Markets, Power, and Politics of World Trade.

Martin Wolf (2005). Why Globalization Works.

GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38910 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.306
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GOV 360N • International Political Economy

Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of international political economy. Its primary focus will be the role of politics and government decision-making in international economic relations. To this end, we will examine three core areas of IPE: international trade, the international monetary system, and investment by multinational corporations. The course begins with a discussion of analytical approaches to IPE. We will use these approaches to address topics as diverse as debates over “globalization,” economic development and post-communist transition, exchange rate policy, the history of international monetary relations, and the politics of financial crisis. While no prerequisites are required, students will benefit from a familiarity with macroeconomics.

 

Grading Policy:

Attendance, participation, quizzes     20%

In-class Midterm                                20%

Take-home Essay Exam                      30%

Final Exam                                          30%

 

Texts:

Frieden, Jeffry, David Lake, and J. Lawrence Broz. 2010. International Political Economy: Perspectives on Global Power and Wealth. 5th edition. New York: W.W. Norton.

Oatley, Thomas. 2011. International Political Economy: Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy. 5th edition. Pearson Longman.

GOV 388L • Internatl Political Economy

39495 • Spring 2014
Meets M 930am-1230pm BAT 5.102
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Prerequisites: None

 

Course Description:

This graduate seminar is designed as a Ph.D.-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with applications to both advanced and developing countries. The syllabus is divided into three sections: international trade; international monetary and financial relations; and international investment and development. An important goal of the course is to use political economic theories to identify the welfare effects and distributional consequences of foreign economic policy decisions, and to use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, bureaucrats, policy-makers, ideas, and power politics interact to shape policy outcomes. It is my hope that this course will generate ideas for your own research, leading to publishable papers and dissertation topics.

 

Grading Policy:

 

Class participation (20%): Students are expected to read each work on the syllabus closely and to come to class prepared to discuss and critique the readings.

 

Five reaction papers (30%): Students are expected to write five reaction papers (2-3 pages in length), each of which critiques a week’s readings. Students are free to choose which five weeks’ readings they would like to critique. Reaction papers are due at the beginning of class. Retroactive papers (that discuss the prior week’s readings) are not permitted.

 

Research proposal and presentation (50%): Students are expected to write a 15-page research proposal on a topic related to international political economy. The proposal should identify a research puzzle, situate that puzzle in the relevant literature, and offer a theory with testable hypotheses to explain the puzzle. Students will then present their research proposals in class at the end of the semester (details TBA). Students will turn in a one-page prospectus for topic approval approximately three weeks after the beginning of the semester.

 

Texts:

Frieden, Jeffry. 2006. Global Capitalism: Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century. New York: WW Norton.

 

Jensen, Nathan M., Glen Biglaiser, Quan Li, Edmund Malesky, Pablo M. Pinto, Santiago M. Pinto, and Joseph L. Staats. 2012. Politics and Foreign Direct Investment. Ann Arbor: Michigan Studies in International Political Economy.

 

Singer, David Andrew. 2006. Regulating Capital: Setting Standards for the International Financial System. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

39250 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ B0.306
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Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of international political economy. Its primary focus will be the role of politics and government decision-making in international economic relations. To this end, we will examine three core areas of IPE: international trade, investment by multinational corporations, and the international monetary system. The course begins with a discussion of analytical approaches to IPE. We will use these approaches to address topics as diverse as debates over “globalization,” economic development and post-communist transition, exchange rate policy, the history of international monetary relations, and the politics of financial crisis. While no prerequisites are required, students will benefit from a familiarity with macroeconomics.

 

Grading Policy:

Attendance, participation, quizzes     20%

In-class Midterm                             20%

Take-home Essay Exam                  30%

Final Exam                                     30%

 

Texts:

Frieden, Jeffry, David Lake, and J. Lawrence Broz. 2010. International Political Economy: Perspectives on Global Power and Wealth. 5th edition. New York: W.W. Norton.

Oatley, Thomas. 2011. International Political Economy: Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy. 5th edition. Pearson Longman.

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