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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Daron Shaw

Professor Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Professor, University Distinguished Teaching Professor
Daron Shaw

Contact

Biography

Before accepting a position at UT, Professor Shaw worked in several political campaigns as a survey research analyst. Shaw also served as a strategist in the 2000 and 2004 presidential election campaigns. He teaches American Government, Campaigns and Elections, Political Parties, Public Opinion and Voting Behavior, and Applied Survey Research. He is a member of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the National Election Studies Board of Overseers, the editorial board for American Politics Research, and serves on the national decision team for Fox News and on the Advisory Board for the Annette Strauss Institute.

In 2008, Shaw's book Unconventional Wisdom: Facts and Myths about American Voters (co-authored with Karen Kaufmann and John Petrocik) was published by Oxford University Press. This comes on the heels of his 2006 book, The Race to 270, which was published by the University of Chicago Press. In addition, Shaw has published articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, Political Behavior, Political Communication, PS: Political Science, Party Politics, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and American Politics Research. Along with Roderick Hart, he co-edited Communications in U.S. Elections: New Agendas, a 2001 book featuring innovative research in the field of political communication.

GOV 325 • Political Parties

37885 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PHR 2.110
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Course ID:        Government 325

Title:                   Political Parties

Instructor:       Professor Shaw

 

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and consequences associated with American political parties. Initially, we focus on parties from a broad theoretical perspective, and draw on data and information from a variety of countries over a number of years. At about week five, the focus shifts to the United States, and we cover topics such as campaign finance, political machines, realignment, voting and public opinion, parties in government, and polarization. The class will consist of lectures, although participation is expected.

 

Prerequisites

Government 310L and 312L.

 

Books

Hershey, M., Party Politics in America, Longman. 

Ware, A. Political Parties and Party Systems, Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation

Two midterm examinations

Two take-home essays

Attendance and Participation

 

 

Book Orders for Professor Daron Shaw, Government Department (Spring 2015)

 

Government 325 (Political Parties)

1. Hershey, M., Party Politics in America, Longman (16th ed.). Paperback: ISBN-10: 0205992099

2. Ware, A. Political Parties and Party Systems, Oxford University Press. Paperback: ISBN: 019878077X

GOV 370L • Campaigns And Elections

39010 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.128
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COURSE:

 

Government 370L

Campaigns and Elections

 

 

COURSE OVERVIEW:

 

This course is designed to introduce you to American political campaigns and elections through lectures and readings. It is not designed to serve as a “how to” manual for aspiring politicians or consultants. More often than not, it is more theoretical than practical. Still, some nuts and bolts information is essential and will be part of the curriculum. My main focus is on federal elections, though references are made to state and local elections. We spend some time revisiting past campaigns and elections in order to contrast and explicate contemporary American electoral politics. The lectures and readings pay particular attention to the presidential elections of 2004, 2008, and 2012. The races between Barack Obama and John McCain and Mitt Romney (respectively) and between George W. Bush and John Kerry are not only the most recent, but provide vivid details supplementing the theoretical and descriptive points raised in the course.

 

As with the lower division version of this course, there are three primary objectives.  The first is to provide basic information about American elections and electioneering by examining both the rules of the game and the players. The second is to develop analytical skills with which to analyze complex relationships and phenomena. The third is to introduce you to the work of the political scientist by concentrating on paradigms and techniques of the discipline. Unlike the lower division course, the emphasis is on the latter two goals. 

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

Midterm Examinations

                                                                                          Midterm #1                                            50 points (25%)

                                                                                          Midterm #2                                            50 points (25%)

 

Campaign Simulation

                                                                                          Group Presentation                          40 points (20%)

                                                                                          Individual Paper                                  50 points (25%)

 

Participation and Attendance                                                                                              10 points (5%)

 

There are two main requirements for this course. First, there will be two exams. The first is worth twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade and will probably be given in early October. The second will also be worth twenty-five percent of your grade and will probably be given in early December, on the last day of class. The examinations are not cumulative; exam #1 covers material through week 6, while exam #2 covers material from weeks 7-14. They will feature a mixed format, with multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions. The exams draw roughly equally from lecture and the readings. When taking the exams, you are not allowed to talk or use your notes, books or neighbor's test.  Anyone caught cheating will be treated per University guidelines.  Study groups, on the other hand, are encouraged.  Failure to take either of the exams at the appointed times results in a grade of F.  I allow cumulative exams for those with compelling excuses, but I am the sole arbiter of what constitutes a compelling excuse. You need medical or extreme personal difficulties before I will consent to such an action. There will be no early exams, nor can exams be taken at any place other than the scheduled room. If you cannot take the exams at the scheduled time and place, you should not enroll in the course.

 

Second, there will be a campaign simulation. I will select several candidates from competitive U.S. Senate elections. Each candidate will have a team of five students, each of whom will be responsible for a report on a selected aspect of the campaign. The individual reports will be 8-10 pages long and will count for twenty-five percent (25%) of your grade. Details on the expectations for the report will be provided in class, but suffice it to say that you are expected to provide a plan detailing how your candidate will deal with one of the following aspects of the campaign: (1) budget, resource allocation, and fundraising, (2) polling and GOTV, (3) paid advertising, (4) scheduling, advance, and media, and (5) online and social media outreach.

 

Each campaign team will also be responsible for a twelve (12) minute presentation. Presentations will be held during a Saturday session in mid-November. The audience will include myself, other professors and political consultants, and several graduate students currently studying campaigns and elections. The point of the presentation is to present a strategic overview of the candidate’s prospects. Unlike the reports, the grade for the presentation will be collective (everyone on the team gets the same mark), and will constitute twenty percent (20%) of your overall grade.

 

Finally, attendance and participation are strongly encouraged. I reserve the right to give pop quizzes at any time, and these quizzes are worth five percent of your final grade.

 

 

READINGS

There is one required text for the course, which will be available at the University Co-Op bookstore.

 

John Sides, Daron Shaw, Keena Lipsitz, and Matt Grossman. 2013 (2012 election update). “Campaigns and Elections: Rules, Reality, Strategy, Choice.” Norton Publishing. 

GOV 381L • Campaigns And Elections

39045 • Fall 2014
Meets M 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

Course:

 

Government 381L

Campaigns and Elections

 

 

Course Overview:

 

This course has two objectives.  The first is to introduce you to the literature and controversies that animate our understanding of American elections and political campaigns.  In this sense, the format of the class will be fairly typical; weekly reading assignments will serve as the basis for critical inquiries into a range of issues.  The second objective is to teach you what it means to do empirical research in this area.  Most of us can readily identify the short-comings of the political science we read, but far fewer can pose interesting alternatives, formulate testable hypotheses and research designs, acquire pertinent data and carry out convincing tests and analyses.  This course aims at focusing your abilities and talents on these endeavors as well as bringing you up to speed on the literature.

 

Grading:

Your grade will be determined as follows:

Class Assignments

  1. Weekly Overviews of the Readings                     20%
  2. Discussion Leader Presentations                        20%

 

Research Paper

  1. Proposal                                                           5%         
  2. Draft                                                               15%      
  3. Final Draft                                                        40%.     

 

Books:

  1. Daniel Shea and Michael Burton (2010), “Campaign Craft.” 4th edition. Praeger Press.
  2. Donald Green and Alan Gerber, (2004), “Get Out the Vote.” Brookings Press.
  3. Sunshine Hillygus and Todd Shields (2008), “The Persuadable Voter.” Princeton University Press.
  4. Lynn Vavreck (2009), “The Message Matters.” Princeton University Press.
  5. Michael Lewis-Beck, Helmut Norpoth, William Jacoby, and Herb Weisberg (2008), “The American Voter Re-Visited.” University of Michigan Press.
  6. Shanto Iyengar and Steven Ansolabehere (1997), “Going Negative.” Free Press.
  7. Thomas Patterson (1993), “Out of Order.” Knopf.
  8. Marty Cohen, David Karol, Hans Noel, and John Zaller (2008), “The Party Decides.” University of Chicago Press.
  9. Richard Johnston, Michael Hagen, Kathleen Hall Jamieson (2004), “The 2000 Presidential Election and the Foundation of Party Politics.” Cambridge University Press.
  10. Larry Bartels (1989), “Presidential Primaries.” Princeton University Press.
  11. Daron Shaw (2006), “The Race to 270.” University of Chicago Press.
  12. John Heilemann and Mark Halperin (2013), “Double Down: Game Change 2012.” Harper Publishing. 

GOV 325 • Political Parties

39100 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Prerequisites

None. Government 310L recommended.

 

Course Description

This course focuses on the role political parties play in representative democracies. We will study the variables that distinguish party systems in different countries, the historical development of parties, and the nature of parties in contemporary democratic societies. We will also explore how parties mobilize mass populations for political purposes, as well as the character of party elites, activists and supporters. 

 

The first four weeks of the course are largely general and theoretical. Examples will be drawn from different countries to illustrate questions and arguments.  The remainder of the course deals almost exclusively with the American parties. 

 

My approach will be thematic.  By studying institutions and processes that are generally characteristic of parties in democratic systems, you will recognize that many features of the American parties are a particular configuration of more general phenomena.  Through the readings and lectures on the U.S. party system you will develop a conceptual and theoretical understanding of not only the American parties, but of political parties across the globe.

 

Grading Policy

 

Your grade will be determined by your score out of 300 possible points. The break-down is as follows:

 

1.       Take-Home Exams

Take-Home 1                                                    75 points             25%

Take-Home 2                                                    75 points             25

2.       Midterm Exams

Midterm  1                                                         60 points             20%

Midterm  2                                                         60 points             20%

 

3.       Attendance and Participation

Attendance and Participation in class   30 points             10%.

 

We will develop a curve based on total points to ascertain an A-F letter grade.

 

Texts

 

There are two assigned texts for the course.  They are available at the University Co-Op bookstore.

 

·         Marjorie Randon Hershey. Party Politics in America (15th ed.), New York: Addison Wesley Longman, 2012

·         Alan Ware. Political Parties and Party Systems, New York: Oxford Press, 1997.

GOV 310L • American Government

38674 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JES A121A
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Prerequisites

None

 

Course Description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While our main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas.  In some instances, the American case is placed in a comparative context derived from the experience of other western democratic nations.  In other instances, we focus on changes over time within the American political system to demonstrate how principles often change with context.  At all times we are interested in a better understanding of how this particular system has developed and what it means for citizens of the United States.

There are three primary objectives in this course.  The first is to provide basic descriptive information about the American and Texas political systems by examining important political processes, institutions, and actors.  The second is to develop analytical skills by which to understand complex relationships and phenomena.  The third is to introduce the work of the political scientist by concentrating on the paradigms and techniques of the discipline.

 

Grading Policy

The course is broken down into two components.  The first component centers on the discussions and the textbook.  Two examinations will be based on these materials and is worth 45% of your grade (90% total).  These exams are NOT cumulative. There will be no early or make-up exams, except for extreme emergencies (and I am the sole arbiter of what constitutes an extreme emergency). The second component centers on attendance, quizzes, and other aspects of in-class performance.

 

Texts

There will be a single American Politics textbook:

 

Lowi, Ginsberg, Shepsle, and Ansolabehere. “American Government: Power and Purpose.”

 

The Texas Politics portion of the course will be covered through material provided on the Texas Politics website.

 

GOV 327L • Public Opinion And Amer Polit

38770 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.306
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Prerequisites

Gov. 310L and/or Gov. 312L.

 

Course Description

This pro-seminar introduces the literature on mass politics and elections. It provides a foundation for subsequent study and research in the field. Although we will cover many topics, we focus on the few themes that have consistently drawn the attention of scholars: the character of political attitudes in mass publics, party identification, turnout and participation, the vote decision, and the way media and parties structure the electoral process. Given the range of the course, coverage of these topics will not be exhaustive. However, we do review many of the “great works” that set the research agenda in the area, while also sampling the subsequent research literature that extends and revises the original results.

 

Grading Policy

There are three main requirements for this course. First, there will be two midterm exams given in this course.  Each exam will have multiple choice and short answer sections. The exams will draw on both lecture material and the readings. They are NOT cumulative.  Second, each student will be responsible for writing a research paper. One possibility is that you will write a research proposal. A proposal paper has three components: (a) it proposes a research question, (b) it reviews the appropriate literature in political science, and (c) it offers a research design that addresses this question. Think of this as something like a grant proposal, in which an applicant is attempting to convince a funding agency that it has an interesting way to investigate an important issue. A second possibility is that you will write a paper analyzing issue opinion or voting behavior within the context of the 2012 elections. That is, you will identify an issue domain or topic—or a group or demographic characteristic—that is likely to have been especially consequential for the election and analyze it relying on polling or voting data. Either of the paper projects includes three components: (1) each student must submit a 1-2 page proposal, identifying the main research question, (2) each student must submit an 8-10 page draft, and (3) each student must submit a 12-15 page final paper on the final day of class. The third and final requirement is attendance and participation. The grading breakdown is 45% exams, 45% paper projects, and 10% participation.

Texts

There are four assigned texts for this class:

Asher, “Polling and the Public: What Every Citizen Should Know.”

Bardes and Oldendick, “Public Opinion: Measuring the American Mind.”

Lewis-Beck, Jacoby, Norpoth, and Weisberg. “The American Voter Re-Visited. Zaller, “The Nature and Origins of Mass Opinion

GOV 310L • American Government

38530 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JES A121A
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Course Description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While our main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas.  In some instances, the American case is placed in a comparative context derived from the experience of other western democratic nations.  In other instances, we focus on changes over time within the American political system to demonstrate how principles often change with context.  At all times we are interested in a better understanding of how this particular system has developed and what it means for citizens of the United States.

There are three primary objectives in this course.  The first is to provide basic descriptive information about the American and Texas political systems by examining important political processes, institutions, and actors.  The second is to develop analytical skills by which to understand complex relationships and phenomena.  The third is to introduce the work of the political scientist by concentrating on the paradigms and techniques of the discipline.

Prerequisites

None.

Books

Lowi, T., B. Ginsberg, K. Shepsle, and S. Ansolabehere. American Government: Power and Purpose, Norton (12th ed.).

Evaluation

Two midterm examinations

Attendance and Participation

GOV 325 • Political Parties

38615 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm PHR 2.110
show description

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and consequences associated with American political parties. Initially, we focus on parties from a broad theoretical perspective, and draw on data and information from a variety of countries over a number of years. At about week five, the focus shifts to the United States, and we cover topics such as campaign finance, political machines, realignment, voting and public opinion, parties in government, and polarization. The class will consist of lectures, although participation is expected.

Prerequisites

Government 310L and 312L.

Books

Hershey, M., Party, Politics in America, Longman.

 Ware, A., Political Parties and Party Systems, Oxford University Press.

Evaluation

Two midterm examinations

Two take-home essays

Attendance and Participation

GOV 370L • Campaigns And Elections

38835 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm MEZ B0.306
show description

see syllabus

GOV 381L • Campaigns And Elections

38908 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 630pm-930pm BAT 1.104
show description

This course has two objectives.  The first is to introduce you to the literature and controversies that animate our understanding of American elections and political campaigns.  In this sense, the format of the class will be fairly typical; weekly reading assignments will serve as the basis for critical inquiries into a range of issues.  The second objective is to teach you what it means to do empirical research in this area.  Most of us can readily identify the short-comings of the political science we read, but far fewer can pose interesting alternatives, formulate testable hypotheses and research designs, acquire pertinent data and carry out convincing tests and analyses.  This course aims at focusing your abilities and talents on these endeavors as well as bringing you up to speed on the literature.

 

GOV F325 • Political Parties

85250 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm BUR 112
show description

Description: The first third of the course covers parties from a theoretical and largely comparative perspective. The second two-thirds focuses on how the factors that animate parties and party systems come together in the American case. We will discuss the different elements of parties from the perspective of political scientists and practitioners.

GOV 310L • American Government

38765 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JES A121A
show description

See Syllabus

GOV 325 • Political Parties

38855 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm MEZ 1.306
show description

The first third of the course covers parties from a theoretical and largely comparative perspective. The second two-thirds focuses on how the factors that animate parties and party systems come together in the American case. We will discuss the different elements of parties from the perspective of political scientists and practitioners.

GOV 370L • Campaigns And Elections

38680 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Overview
This course is designed to introduce you to American political campaigns and elections through lectures and readings. It is not designed to serve as a “how to” manual for aspiring politicians or consultants. It is more theoretical than practical. Still, some nuts and bolts information is essential and will be part of the curriculum. My main focus is on federal elections, though references are made to state and local elections. We spend some time revisiting past campaigns and elections in order to contrast and explicate contemporary American electoral politics. The lectures and readings pay particular attention to the presidential elections of 2000, 2004, and 2008. These races are not only the most recent, but provide vivid details supplementing the theoretical and descriptive points raised in the course.
More specifically, the course has three primary objectives.  The first is to provide basic information about American elections and electioneering by examining both the rules of the game and the players. The second is to develop analytical skills with which to analyze complex relationships and phenomena. The third is to introduce you to the work of the political scientist by concentrating on paradigms and techniques of the discipline. My emphasis here is on the latter two goals.  You will have a variety of ways to demonstrate your mastery of course material: there will be two in-class examinations, a group presentation, and a research paper. How well you do on each of these will determine your grade in the course.

Textbooks:

Required
These are available at the University Co-Op bookstore.
1.    Daniel M. Shea and Michael John Burton. Campaign Craft. (4th edition): Praeger, 2010.
2.    Catherine Shaw. The Campaign Manager. (4th edition): Westview Press, 2010.

Optional
Also available at the Co-Op bookstore or online.
3.    Daron Shaw. The Race to 270. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2006.
4.    John Heilmann and Mark Halperin. Game Change. New York, NY: Harper, 2010.

GOV 381L • Political Parties

38770 • Fall 2010
Meets TH 630pm-930pm BAT 1.104
show description

COURSE OVERVIEW
This course reflects the beliefs expressed above. Our focus is on parties as electoral connections.  Some appreciable portion of the class contains non-American material that analyzes party system themes (allowing us to sample the variance in institutional forms and processes).  We do dwell on the American example, however, particularly in the latter stages of the course.  It is also worth observing that some important topics are not covered, or are covered only incidentally, due to time constraints.  You are invited to read extensively about one of these “missed” topics and write your paper on it.

Class meetings will run a maximum of three hours with a 15-minute break about two hours into class.  (A typical week consists of reading around 175 pages of material. Some weeks will be less and some will be considerably more).  At the beginning of each class, you will turn in a 1-2 page, typed, double-spaced overview of the week's readings.

The first two hours of class meetings will be run as a pro-seminar on various topics.  Within broad subject areas we will discuss several perspectives and contributions.  In this sense, the format of the class will be fairly typical; weekly reading assignments will serve as the basis for critical inquiries into a range of issues. Discussion leaders will be designated each week to provide critical overviews and facilitate discussions.

The third hour of the class is dedicated to aid the development and execution of students’ research papers. This design is to ensure that the course teaches you something about what it means to do research in political science. Most of us can readily identify the short-comings of the political science we read, but far fewer can pose interesting alternatives, formulate testable hypotheses and research designs, acquire pertinent data and carry out convincing tests and analyses. This course aims at focusing your abilities and talents on these endeavors as well as bringing you up to speed on the literature.


MATERIALS
Books
There are four assigned texts for the course.  Three are available at the University Co-Op bookstore.

1.    John Aldrich. Why Parties? University of Chicago Press.
2.    Anthony Downs. An Economic Theory of Democracy. Harper.
3.    Alan Ware. Political Parties and Party Systems, Oxford University Press.

The fourth is:

4.    John Bibby and Brian Schaffner, Politics, Parties, and Elections in America. 6th ed. Thompson Wadsworth.

You can order this online.

GOV 325 • Political Parties

84765 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Description: The first third of the course covers parties from a theoretical and largely comparative perspective. The second two-thirds focuses on how the factors that aniimate parties and party systems come together in the American case. We will discuss the different elements of parties from the perspective of political scientists and practitioners.

Grading Policy: Students will be graded based on two in-class examinations and a single take-home essay (from an array of options)

Textbooks: There will be two textbooks:
Hershey, Marjorie, "Party Politics in America" (14th ed.)
Ware, Alan, "Political Parties and Party Systems".

GOV 310L • American Government

39025 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm UTC 2.102A
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

84575 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 JGB 2.324
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 310L • American Government

38085 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 BEL 328
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

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